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  1. #1
    What's the word? Rhia7's Avatar
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    Paper: Can Social Bookmarking Improve Web Search?
    A recent 11 page paper analyzed 40 million bookmarks from del.icio.us to see how social bookmarking sites impact search engine sites.

    The findings were "currently [social bookmarking sites] lack the size and distribution of tags necessary to make a significant impact."

    http://dbpubs.stanford.edu:8090/pub/2008-2

    Heymann, Paul; Koutrika, Georgia; Garcia-Molina, Hector. "Can Social Bookmarking Improve Web Search?", First ACM International Conference on Web Search and Data Mining (WSDM'08), 2008.
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  2. #2
    Speechless OTProf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rhia7
    11 page paper analyzed 40 million bookmarks
    Hmmmm..... must've been very small font or abbreviated research!!

  3. #3
    What's the word? Rhia7's Avatar
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    Did you read the paper? It's interesting:

    http://dbpubs.stanford.edu:8090/pub/...ame=2008-2.pdf
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  4. #4
    What's the word? Rhia7's Avatar
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    One interesting paragraph describes how the meta information (on a webmaster's site) has fallen out of favor and Google Co-op (where webmasters can label their sites with "topics") has replaced "traditional" <meta> information in the head.

    However, unlike social bookmarking, these metadata
    approaches require site owners to know all of the labels a
    user might attach to their site. This leads to the well studied
    “vocabulary problem” (see [8], [3]), whereby users have
    many different types of terminology for the same resources.
    Ultimately, unlike previous metadata, social bookmarking
    systems have the potential to overcome the vocabulary problem
    by presenting many terms for the same content created
    by many disparate users. [1]
    See http://www.google.com/coop/
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  5. #5
    Speechless OTProf's Avatar
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    OK - OK I downloaded it!

    Wow -- it is dense and I'd be reticent to critique the research of Stanford dudes!
    I agree - it is interesting and certainly very relevant to those interested in search/SEO.

    Along with your excerpt, I found this interesting:

    "These results suggest that URLs produced by social bookmarking are unlikely to be numerous enough to impact the crawl ordering of a major search engine, and the tags produced are unlikely to be much more useful than a full text search emphasizing page titles."

  6. #6
    What's the word? Rhia7's Avatar
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    I would tend to disagree with this part of the statement you quoted above, OTProf: "... tags produced are unlikely to be much more useful than a full text search emphasizing page titles."

    I think that multiple tags from multiple users of a social bookmarking site would aid in finding results due to variety and diversity.

    If a webmaster has to create a [rigid] standard of [pre-defined, pre-set] terms, some terms may be missed.

    I do agree with the main point of the article that social bookmarking sites have not eclipsed the search engines yet.

    Although social bookmarking sites have not eclipsed the engines, they are beneficial for many reasons one being that social bookmarking allows more flexibility and the inherent interaction is a plus too.

    I found some individual nuggets of useful information in that paper
    Last edited by Rhia7; February 14th, 2008 at 01:21 AM.
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  7. #7
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    I'll Take #1 for 1.2 ........
    Hi !

    Without trying to miss the point here, the article states that there are 115,000,000 book marks in existence. So for one thing I'd say the potential is enormous indeed and secondly if someone were to have a mere 1% of that ~ Say 1,200,000 bookmarks I would think that could be a very good thing where one's rankings are concerned.

    Hmmm....

    Steve
    Last edited by Steve Williams; February 19th, 2008 at 11:03 AM. Reason: Potentail is spelled P O T E N I A L.......

  8. #8
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    Skeptic!
    Personally, I'm skeptic about social bookmarking's ability to improve search ranks directly. Unless your content is super sticky or really viral, its unlikely that the content will get on pages with high enough page rank to materially impact your own! Even if they do, the changes should be short lived due to the dynamic nature of digg/delicious homepages.

    Indirectly it **may** be a good thing but only if (1) again your are on a high traffic page, and (2) **if** once you are on a high traffic page and people subsequently write about you on their blogs or link to you from there websites. It's possible, but improbably for a vast majority of submissions.

    Just my 2 cents

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