Results 1 to 22 of 22
  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    February 3rd, 2006
    Posts
    69
    How would you make money from video games online?
    My friend and I both love playing video games, mostly mmorpg's and I have web skills and can put together a site.

    How would you make money with video games?

    Some of my ideas are:
    a. make a blog about games, giving industry news and game reviews.
    It would take a year or 2 to take off and get busy, but someday it could turn into a community hangout that grows.
    The money comes from banner ads and adsense, like most blogs.

    But again its slow and Id like to make money in the next few months than the next few years.

    b. Just make an online store that is a re-seller of games.
    Buy traffic from adwords and other sources to sell the games.

    c. make many many many small 1 page sites about video games and load adsense on them. Submit them to all the seaech engines and wait for the seo spiders to crawl the sites and make money from all the adsense.

    d. other?

    Id love some feedback on making money with online gaming. Especially mmorpgs
    thanks

  2. #2
    ABW Ambassador Boom or Bust's Avatar
    Join Date
    February 3rd, 2008
    Posts
    3,955
    A few years ago one of my sons set up a game server and hosted an online game. It was one of the Star Trek games. He also created a forum. The game attracted immediate traffic and then the gamers all posted on the forum. He built up quite a community in a very short time. I kept suggesting to him that he should find a way to monetize it. I new virtually nothing about affiliate marketing at that time so didn't give him any direction. The primary problem with that demographic was that the gamers didn't have much money...



    X

  3. #3
    Full Member id2k's Avatar
    Join Date
    August 22nd, 2005
    Posts
    276
    i would suggest having a social networking site for video game lovers, here the user can create their profile page and list their fav video games, video game accessories and other gaming related details...like minded game lovers can add each other to their buddy list. you can generate revenue through adsense and direct selling ads..once you good have traffic and members database i am sure getting ad for your vertical will not be a hard task..

    try putting in some thinking and i am sure you can add many features to your game lovers social networking site..

  4. #4
    Member buy-tees's Avatar
    Join Date
    December 1st, 2005
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    175
    You could try additionally offering t-shirts to the game lovers. Gaming t-shirts do very well. Thinkgeek, OfflineTshirts both have affiliate programs.

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    February 3rd, 2006
    Posts
    69
    Thanks for the feedback everyone.
    id2k I would put together a social network, but my problem is that it takes a loooong time to build up and I dont know if its profitable once do build it up. I know community message board owners and they make pennies, and they say they run the forum because they love it, not for the money.

    It can take years to build a large community so I want to make sure theres a big prize at the end of all the work.

    **ps - I just spent 2 years putting together a community and it turned out to be a stinker so Im a little gunshy about communities. But Ill do it if they have a great profit potential

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    February 3rd, 2006
    Posts
    69
    Quote Originally Posted by buy-tees
    You could try additionally offering t-shirts to the game lovers. Gaming t-shirts do very well. Thinkgeek, OfflineTshirts both have affiliate programs.
    Thats a great idea, thanks a lot.

  7. #7
    Newbie
    Join Date
    October 20th, 2007
    Posts
    17
    I currently go after one specific game and earn around $200 a day. It took me 2yrs of trial and error, but I've finally learned from my mistakes and am so happy! I took one specific game, and made a website where users complete surveys and such to earn the money for the game. At the top of each hour, a voucher code is emailed to those people who completed a survey which they redeem in the game for the money in it. I make about $1.50 from each survey, and depending on how much I advertise, I can make around $40 an hour.

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    February 3rd, 2006
    Posts
    69
    Well I went to a video game store and chatted with the clerk there, and he made it sound like it would be dumb as heck to make a video game website because there are already huge sites out there that offer massive content.

    One site he mentioned was allakhazam.com, and he said they already have a massive huge community, prize giveaways, tons of updates, all the quests all mapped out on it. It would be dumb to try and make a site when stuff like that is already out there.
    :/

  9. #9
    ABW Ambassador Boom or Bust's Avatar
    Join Date
    February 3rd, 2008
    Posts
    3,955
    That's just one guy's opinion. There are lots of games with loyal followings. Even some older games are still popular. The trick is picking one. On my son's server it was amazing how all he had to do was make it available online and it attracted the gamers like flies...



    X

  10. #10
    ABW Ambassador Daniel M. Clark's Avatar
    Join Date
    January 7th, 2006
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    2,082
    My advice is to go small. Don't try to make a World of Warcraft site, because you won't make anything from it. You're right about sites like Allakhazam, they're monstrous (no pun intended). They've got the quest walkthroughs, message boards, big communities, giveaways and all the bells and whistles. If you're new to this space and you don't have a million to invest, staying away (for now) from sites about games like WoW, Conan or Guild Wars would be safe. Start small. Pick a game that doesn't have a thousand quality sites already devoted to it. There will be fewer players, and therefore fewer people to target, but you will have less competition, so you're more likely to get more visitors.

    People still play Ultima Online. One of my favorite games (though I don't play because of time constraints) is EVE. EVE has fewer players than a game like WoW - well under a million - but the fan base is positively rabid. People still play Everquest, though I think there are more than enough EQ sites still around. How about Star Wars: Galaxies? If you want to branch out of MMOs, look at games that have strong multiplayer aspects like Unreal Tournament or Battlefield. Yes, there are lots of sites about UT and Battlefield, but try thinking along those lines.

    How about doing kids games? Toon Town, for example. Not too many sites devoted to Toon Town, I think.

    Food for thought
    Daniel M. Clark
    Tech Manager
    Greg Hoffman Consulting

  11. #11
    Full Member OICUAM2's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 18th, 2006
    Location
    Madison, WI
    Posts
    421
    Google is punishing one page sites and specifc landing pages that have nothing but AdSense or a specific affiliate link. That model used to work, but it is harder now.

    I agree with the idea of picking a very specifc niche market such as a specific game that isn't being serviced right now. Pick some games you like, do some searching and see if there is a need for a community site.

    Gaming is going more online. The video game store will disappear just as the video rental store is starting to disappear. Games on discs will soon be a thing of the past.

    Microsoft, Sony, Nintendo, etc... are making portals for gamers where points are gained for making purchases and upgrading their games with better levels, themes, weapons, etc... There should be affiliate programs for directing people to these type of online gaming transactions at some point.

    Video game rentals through Gamefly have been pretty successful for some affiliate marketers.

    The main problem is it is getting really easy to make a site for just about anything. I wanted to do some testing with the video game market so I used Ning.com to make a video game community called PlayHighTech.com just to fool around with ideas. It cost me only $5 a month to use my own domain name and I had a complete community site within a few minutes. Lots of traffic available, but monetization was difficult so I stopped working on it while I'm working now on more profitable niches.

    I'm not a big gamer and I think that was the biggest reason why I stopped working on it. I think a gaming site still has potential, but I would get more specific in a certain niche if I were to get back into the gaming market.

  12. #12
    ABW Ambassador Daniel M. Clark's Avatar
    Join Date
    January 7th, 2006
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    2,082
    Games on discs aren't going anywhere any more than movies on shiny platters are. The gaming industry, especially the PC gaming industry, gets served with a death notice every year. "Consoles are killing PCs!" "The Internet is killing stores!" "The Internet is killing physical media!" "John Carmack is killing everyone!" That last one might be true. It took the industry a decade to even start putting games on DVD instead of on CD because they said not enough gamers had DVD drives. The percentage of households with broadband access is not nearly large enough for them to stop shipping games on disc altogether, and it will be years more before it gets that high.

    Don't look at Steam as if it's going to revolutionize the delivery of games in the short term. And GameFly is all well and good, but it's not for PC gamers (and it's still shipping games on physical disc, not online). As for video rental stores, there are two within walking distance of my house, and five more less than 10 minutes away by car. If the trend is toward the closing of stores, it's happening very slowly, and it's not going on here.

    Just my two cents. I've been playing video games for 20 years and went to school in Orlando to learn how to program and design them. I know whereof I speak
    Daniel M. Clark
    Tech Manager
    Greg Hoffman Consulting

  13. #13
    Full Member OICUAM2's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 18th, 2006
    Location
    Madison, WI
    Posts
    421
    A valuable two cents.

    Definately a long term trend, but I now watch movies online or on discs sent from Netflix and the video rental place I used to go to just closed.

    For people just starting a video game site, these ten to twenty year trends are important.

    Also good to know for personal relations. I gave a friend of mine a cassette tape with music he and I played together in college and he laughed and said he didn't have a cassette tape player. We were only in college ten years ago.

  14. #14
    ABW Ambassador Daniel M. Clark's Avatar
    Join Date
    January 7th, 2006
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    2,082
    Ah, very salient point - but ten years ago, that was the end of the cassette era, thanks to the full penetration of CDs. Where we're at now with games might be better compared to the mid/late-80's, which was the early/middle era of CDs, before CD players were ten bucks at Walmart I think we agree on the general trend, it was your sentence, "Games on discs will soon be a thing of the past." that caught my attention most of all. I don't think it will be soon, that's all
    Daniel M. Clark
    Tech Manager
    Greg Hoffman Consulting

  15. #15
    What's the word? Rhia7's Avatar
    Join Date
    January 13th, 2006
    Posts
    9,578
    Quote Originally Posted by HecticDMC
    "Games on discs will soon be a thing of the past." that caught my attention most of all. I don't think it will be soon, that's all
    You don't believe in "instant gratification upon payment" [i.e. download & play upon demand]?
    ~Rhia7 -- Remember the 7
    Twitter me

  16. #16
    ABW Ambassador Daniel M. Clark's Avatar
    Join Date
    January 7th, 2006
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    2,082
    When it's feasible, sure. But I don't believe that paying $75 for a 5-6GB download on dial-up is feasible. And so far, the industry has agreed. It's moving slowly in that direction, but we're not going to see the end of games on disc any time soon.
    Daniel M. Clark
    Tech Manager
    Greg Hoffman Consulting

  17. #17
    What's the word? Rhia7's Avatar
    Join Date
    January 13th, 2006
    Posts
    9,578
    Quote Originally Posted by HecticDMC
    When it's feasible, sure. But I don't believe that paying $75 for a 5-6GB download on dial-up is feasible.
    Oh man, I thought I was the last remaining dinosaur to switch to broadband.
    How many people in the United States are still on dial-up?

    I'm not talking about Australia (or Europe).

    Don't most people within the United States (with the money to pay for video/online games) plus their grandmothers have broadband?

    [the destitute/poor population -- <in the United States this would include certain geographic locations> -- doesn't count because they wouldn't have the expendable income to purchase video/online games]
    Last edited by Rhia7; June 28th, 2008 at 01:39 AM.
    ~Rhia7 -- Remember the 7
    Twitter me

  18. #18
    ABW Ambassador Daniel M. Clark's Avatar
    Join Date
    January 7th, 2006
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    2,082
    It really depends... gamers are a pretty diverse bunch. There are the hardcore folks that upgrade their video cards every year and build their own rigs. There are the more casual gamers that are still playing on a PC they bought from Best Buy in 2002. Then there are the ultra casual gamers that only play casino games that they get on those shareware $4.99 discs you see at Walmart. And those are just the PC game players. My sister has a Wii, but she doesn't need a computer at home (she works waaaaay too much and doesn't even want to hear the word 'computer' at home), so she doesn't have any internet access at all. I've got a Playstation 2, and it's not internet-enabled. I'd be interested in hearing the statistics on how many console gamers are online with their consoles actually - I know X-Box Live didn't start off strong, but I think it's doing better now.

    One of the most interesting things I read recently was from Mark Rein, from Epic Games. He noted that although Unreal Tournament is a wildly popular series, and it's known for it's strong multiplayer, their research showed that a minority percentage of buyers actually played online. The majority actually never played online, they only played the single-player campaigns.

    So, there's all kinds of people out there playing games... and I do think that gamers are more likely to have broadband when possible... but I really don't think it's enough of a percentage for the industry to start moving completely away from physical delivery of games.
    Daniel M. Clark
    Tech Manager
    Greg Hoffman Consulting

  19. #19
    What's the word? Rhia7's Avatar
    Join Date
    January 13th, 2006
    Posts
    9,578
    Quote Originally Posted by HecticDMC
    So, there's all kinds of people out there playing games... and I do think that gamers are more likely to have broadband when possible... but I really don't think it's enough of a percentage for the industry to start moving completely away from physical delivery of games.
    Although there will always be those who cling to what they were used to at a given time period [I'm a fan of Atari joysticks for Space Invaders - -- heck I remember Pong ] , my hunch for the not-so-distant-future is that download on demand will become the regular format for movies and for video games (possibly with a subscription base).

    Anyway here are some interesting links:

    72 percent of the U.S. population plays video games

    And among the people playing games, 58 percent said they played online.

    The online participation included everything from children's game sites and casual word, card and puzzle games to the hard-core role-playing games such as "World of Warcraft" and online racing and combat games through consoles such as the Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3.

    The number of online gamers relative to the total U.S. population is 42 percent so far this year, up from 40 percent in 2007.
    http://www.military.com/entertainmen...ay-video-games
    And from The Pew Internet & American Life Project:
    Play computer or console games online 49% (of Teens)
    http://72.14.205.104/search?q=cache:...ient=firefox-a
    You can reach your own conclusions but most households that I have been in contact with have broadband access [including my parents].
    More and more of the "gamer segment of the population" will find the ability to play online with "their peers" without leaving home very stimulating [online gaming downloads will create a social possibility never seen before by earlier generations].

    Teens will always be a major part of the gaming population but I watched a news program that said elders are getting into gaming too -- it's good for their intellectual reflexes, gaming provides excitement, it's good for coordination, it's good for memory development -- this would be more exciting for older people if they can be in contact with others online and play with others online.

    In recent years, gaming has expanded from arcades and TV consoles to include
    mobile and Internet-based gaming. Massively multiplayer online games (MMOGs)
    such as World of Warcraft and online virtual social worlds (VSWs) such as Second
    Life have made gaming more interactive, giving the industry common ground with
    burgeoning social networking websites. The most popular role-playing MMOGs
    attract hardcore players willing to spend considerable time developing their characters
    and creating new scenarios. VSWs may have greater future growth potential because
    they appeal to a broader spectrum of online players.

    from The Digital Economy FactBook
    http://www.pff.org/issues-pubs/books/factbook_2007.pdf
    Last edited by Rhia7; June 28th, 2008 at 02:40 AM.
    ~Rhia7 -- Remember the 7
    Twitter me

  20. #20
    Outsourced Program Manager John Jupp's Avatar
    Join Date
    January 23rd, 2005
    Location
    England
    Posts
    1,502
    I've had a look around but nothing works properly on XP Pro or Vista......I am after a PC version I can download of Elite II that properly runs on Vista and XP Pro.

    Now as a former "Elite" and "Deadly", I would just love to play that again and again.
    Flambi Media Limited - USA/UK/EU Affiliate Management Expertise

  21. #21
    ABW Ambassador Daniel M. Clark's Avatar
    Join Date
    January 7th, 2006
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    2,082
    You're preaching to the choir, Rhea. I recognize the trend toward moving online. We just disagree on how fast it's going to happen. GameStop isn't in any danger of going out of business due to online game sales in the near future, and by "near", I mean 5-10 years. Maybe closer to 5, but not less than 5. People like us take for granted broadband access, it's easy to forget that a majority of Americans still don't have it. If this report is correct, 51% of the population lacks broadband. I just don't believe that that is enough of a market penetration for any content to move completely online - games, movies, tv shows, or anything.

    Tie this discussion into the one about companies like Comcast starting to charge users for high bandwidth usage, and that will only slow down online delivery of these things. Who's going to pay $75 for the game, spend a couple of hours downloading it on their 2Mb "broadband" connection, and then pay another $5, $10, $30? bucks to Comcast for blowing out their monthly allotment in one shot?

    Again - I agree that eventually, online delivery is going to happen, and it's going to be the standard. But I've seen how the industry moves when it comes to their delivery methods. Change comes slowly... very, very slowly, despite appearances.
    Daniel M. Clark
    Tech Manager
    Greg Hoffman Consulting

  22. #22
    Affiliate Manager Sachin - Dawdle.com's Avatar
    Join Date
    June 12th, 2008
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    11
    There are a number of gaming communities out there - 360voice.com, Gamestrata.com, etc. so that jives well with your aversion to another community site.

    If you decide to build up your own site, I hope you'll consider our affiliate program - http://www.dawdle.com/about/index.php/affiliates/. We're an online marketplace just for gaming, and we're seeing some pretty big growth. We let anyone list their items for sale, but we focus on the mom and pop independent stores across the country who compete with GameStop.

    Some people have talked about games on physical media going away - I just like to point out that physical media of music was ~$15B last year and digital downloads was ~$3B. Physical media might be in a decline, but the labels, studios, and publishers would have to be crazy to try to push it along. The rate of decline of physical media is higher than the growth in legitimate downloads. The gaming blogs were talking about that piracy on PCs is about a 15:1 ratio of stolen to purchased content.

    As you can tell, this is a pretty big hobbyhorse of mine (not mind, dummy), so I apologize for talking y'alls ears off.

    Cheers,
    Sachin

    AM, Dawdle.com

  23. Newsletter Signup

+ Reply to Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •