Results 1 to 21 of 21
  1. #1
    ABW Ambassador
    Join Date
    January 18th, 2005
    Posts
    2,341
    OK, I learnt the hard way - my hard disk crashed a few weeks ago and I am only now back to where I was (apart from a lot of lost e-mails and work I had to redo).

    My question is abouth the best way to back up a hard disk. I have looked at Ghost & GoBack (the latter is a lot cheaper), and wondered whether anyone has experience of these and which they recommend.

    Do these programs make a complete backup (including boot area of disk etc), so that in the event of failure, you plug in a new drive and run the restore software?

    Any help would be appreciated. My local repair shop told me there is nothing wrong witht he hard disk that failed (tell that to my data), so the crash must have wiped the boot sector or something else I dont understand very well. I can see that if indeed it was not the fault of the hard drive, it may be the motherboard or memory etc which caused the corruption - in which case it is likely to happen again.

    Anyone got any ideas/tips/recommendations?

    TIA


    Download Site Map Creator Today

  2. #2
    You are in, or you are out ... choose!
    Join Date
    January 18th, 2005
    Posts
    459
    Ghost programs do indeed make a complete backup of the disk data including the boot information which makes it very easy to recover your system. The trick is to have a routine of doing periodic (daily?) ghosts as a safety net.

    The drawbacks of that process are the time needed in doing the ghost, which also ties up your machines, but also that you get an exact copy of the system, warts and all. If your system is clean, no problem. But if you have been installing/removing/upgrading software ...

    The other approach is to back up the data, using something like Handy Backup (which I actually find invaluable). These programs do incremental backups of selected data folders/files, either manually or scheduled, making it easy to restore the data.

    I prefer to use a combination of Ghosting and Data Backup by creating a clean basic system which I then Ghost. This makes it quick to get a basic system running again to which I then add necessary programs. I also schedule data backups using Handy Backup which makes it easy to restore the data once the system is rebuilt.

    Woz

  3. #3
    ABW Ambassador
    Join Date
    January 18th, 2005
    Location
    Reno, NV
    Posts
    856
    I tell anyone who listens (no one ever seems to!) that an external USB 2.0 Hard drive is THE way to go. Lightning fast to back up massive amounts of files. It's portable, so you can take it to any computer and plug it in and it will work.

    And, at least on my unit, it offers one touch backup. Just configure the software to backup specific files, touch the button, and it does its thing. I don't use this feature, but its neat that it's available.

    I used to use CD's for backup, but they were a pain and created quite a mess after a while. I use an 80GB Maxtor 2.0 USB External - paid like $149 for it. I've seen them on Tiger and Amazon, too (bought mine locally).

    Jim

  4. #4
    Resident Genius and Staunch Capitalist Leader's Avatar
    Join Date
    January 18th, 2005
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    12,817
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> I tell anyone who listens (no one ever seems to!) <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    I'm listenin'; I was hoping someone would recommend a particular brand/model! I'll check out that Maxtor.

    Is it easy to set up?

    It is a beautiful thing, to do nothing, and then rest afterwards.~Spanish Proverb

  5. #5
    ABW Ambassador
    Join Date
    January 18th, 2005
    Location
    Reno, NV
    Posts
    856
    Easy? XP has the driver built in - that's how easy it is! Just plug it in and you're all set. No setup or anything to use it just as a basic external HD.

    If you want to use the specialty backup software that comes with it, you just install it and then configure it. I don't use this feature, but it seemed easy enough to use.

    Jim

  6. #6
    Resident Genius and Staunch Capitalist Leader's Avatar
    Join Date
    January 18th, 2005
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    12,817
    Cool, sounds good.

    It is a beautiful thing, to do nothing, and then rest afterwards.~Spanish Proverb

  7. #7
    ABW Ambassador Jane's Avatar
    Join Date
    January 18th, 2005
    Posts
    1,350
    I had a kangaroo usb backup drive. Sounded funny from the start but never having had one before I didn't know what it should sound like.
    It crashed, started making a clunking noise and it was shot! Think it was a lemon from the start.
    I now have a buslink model.

  8. #8
    Newbie
    Join Date
    January 18th, 2005
    Posts
    33
    Separate hard drive for data and for OS/Programs. Then have another external USB hard drive for data backup. You can use automatic programs to backup all the data every day...

    At least that's what I do now...

    The ghost backup ideas seems good to try as well..

  9. #9
    Affiliate/AM Moonlighter dflsports's Avatar
    Join Date
    January 17th, 2005
    Posts
    874
    If you have a Sam's Club close by (and a membership) I just bought a 160gb Western Digital USB 2.0 drive for $179.

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    January 18th, 2005
    Posts
    199
    I had the same problem not too long ago. Thankfully I had an external Maxtor harddrive with all of my data backed up. The only problem is when the hard drive goes out, you still have to go through the process of installing all of the software, then moving the data back over from the external. The other problem with only having data backed up is you lose all the little things that you’ve done over the years (bookmarks, etc).
    This whole recovery process took me out for several days, while I reinstalled the new hard drive, installed programs, downloaded and installed all the XP updates, recovered data, etc. Being out several days is not something I want to go through again, so I’ve done the following which I also suggest that others do when you don’t want to be down without a computer for a couple days.
    1. Keep an external hard drive with all of the data backed up. Then keep this external in a very safe place. I keep mine in a fireproof safe right next to my desk. At the end of everyday, I pull it out of the safe, back up my data and back in the safe it goes. This external hard drive is only kept in the unlikely event that my office would burn to the ground. At least I have my data.
    2. What I’ve done with my computer is set up it up as a RAID (1) system. Basically you’ll have two hard drives in the computer, both mirroring each other. The computer will only see one drive. If one goes out, the other drive keeps humming along. Then you simply replace the bad drive when time permits and you minimize your downtime. For anyone unfamiliar with RAID, here is a link to an article that explains how it works.
    Hardware Tips: Take a Crash Course in Emergency PC Recovery

  11. #11
    Full Member
    Join Date
    January 18th, 2005
    Posts
    202
    Ghost is a good solution for backing up your system when it's new so you can restore the same hardware. But I believe that you'll have to restore it onto the same hardware.

    So if you're replaceing the failed hardware with a completely different computer, the ghost will have problems.

    You've gotten a lot of good advice on this thread. The more you can do the better you will be protected. The fireproof safe is a question in my mind. They may do a good job of protecting your stuff from burning, but does the heat damage the contents? It probably will depend on the safe.

    I'll be getting a safe deposit box in the future, along with duplicate computers, as many backups as I can. Also, don't forget theft. I worked for a software company that was hit.

    I worked on SCO at the time and my Sco Box was disconnected and sitting outside my office. Apparently, they did not have time to take it too, but they thought it was a PC and they were planning to take it. I did not not have a backup.

  12. #12
    Full Member
    Join Date
    January 18th, 2005
    Posts
    442
    perfectG,

    WOW! That happens to me as well!!!!

    I immediately do research on data recovery software and has bought R-Studio. because I can't boot my harddisk in IDE mode, I have to use PIO and the system took 20 hours to complete scanning my 40 GB hard drive.

    BUT! I recover ALL my important files. Those that generate my source of income!!!

  13. #13
    ABW Ambassador
    Join Date
    January 18th, 2005
    Posts
    2,341
    RedFish
    Thanks for the info. Looks like a good tool for recovering files. I still have stuff that I lost on the drive, but will give the demo a go and see if it can get them back for me. If the demo can, I'll get the full version.

    I have formatted the disk since failure, so will test whether R-Studio is as good as it claims.


    Download Site Map Creator Today

  14. #14
    ABW Ambassador
    Join Date
    January 18th, 2005
    Posts
    2,341
    Their R-Drive Image looks cool too.

    Cannot use Ghost as my CD drive is not compatible with it. Don't want to use GoBack as support seems to be non-existent.

    Found another - Acronis True Image, but they have not responded to my e-mail.

    Time to give R_Drive Image a go I suppose.


    Download Site Map Creator Today

  15. #15
    Full Member
    Join Date
    January 18th, 2005
    Posts
    442
    So have you got your files back? I do try the demo before I purchased the code. The demo version will scan all files, but only allow you to recover files with a size limit. And I have to grab the licence file immediately after I found out it works!

    My hard disk was crash to a certain extend that there were cracking sound and I need to take more than 5 minutes to boot my system with that hard disk!

    Oh by the way, the recovery also takes over 3 hours to complete (after scanning) because I am in PIO mode!

  16. #16
    ABW Ambassador
    Join Date
    January 18th, 2005
    Posts
    2,341
    Have not tried to get the data back yet. May never do it since the hard dirve is back at the shop, AGAIN.

    I took it in to the shop I bought it from shortly after the crash and asked them to check it. Told them what the problems was. As I could not be without a hard disk I bought another. Over a week later they told me it was ready to pick up. Great I said, what was the problem with it?

    Nothing, they said. It is in perfect working order.

    I was furious, but took it back in case I was mistaken. I ran scandisk and had two errors. Scandisk fixed them. I ran scandisk again and the same two errors were still there. Scandisk was not fixing them. I took it back to the shop and told them it was still not working. I asked them what happened when they ran scandisk on it. They said "Oh, we didn't do that. We have a seagate utility that checks the sectors".


    As you can imagine I was none too happy. They have it back, and I am looking forward to the phonecall when they ask me to go pick it up. We'll see if they find the problems this time.


    Download Site Map Creator Today

  17. #17
    Member
    Join Date
    January 18th, 2005
    Posts
    50
    A little off topic of this thread, but somewhat related...

    I just had a PC die. I was able to borrow another machine and plug in my old hard drive. But now I can't access any files I had encrypted, presumeably because I encrypted them with the user account I had on my old machine, which is different than the one on the new machine.

    I tried creating an account on the new machine with the same username and password, assigning "Full Control" permission, taking ownership of the files, etc. But nothing works.

    Anybody know a way to crack 'em?

  18. #18
    ABW Ambassador
    Join Date
    January 18th, 2005
    Posts
    2,341
    How did you encrypt them?


    Download Site Map Creator Today

  19. #19
    Full Member
    Join Date
    January 18th, 2005
    Posts
    362
    if your OS is on that drive that you plugged in another machine, try booting off of it.

    if not then good luck

    I once got curious about how one would get data off an encrypted drive without the original install that encrypted it.. just spend some quality time with google

    This was awhile ago but I think there was a method.. I mean really long awhile ago so I don't have specifics.

  20. #20
    Member
    Join Date
    January 18th, 2005
    Posts
    50
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by perfectG:
    How did you encrypt them?
    <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    I used the file encryption built into Windows 2000. In other words, right click the file, properties, advanced, check Encrypt contents to secure data.

  21. #21
    ABW Ambassador
    Join Date
    January 18th, 2005
    Location
    Honiara, Solomon Islands
    Posts
    1,085
    what candian eh said is the best solution to get to your files just boot the new pc with the old pcs hard drive. Press F8 at boot up and choose the safe boot method to boot the pc and avoid all the driver installs that the pc will try to do due to different hardware layout. another way would be to replace the faulty equipmetn and reuse the hardrive in the new system you use as the primary hdd and on boot up w2000 will discover and install new drivers for it as needed.

    as to the best back up methods emione has the best solution IMO. You dont want to be messing with any daily backup procedures if you can avoid it as human forgetfulness/error is the major cause of data loss. Any Windows product from the NT tree (NT/2000/XP) has built in drive management ability and the cheapest option would be:

    Half duplex drive mirroring (2 drives connected to the same hd controller that contain the same info.)

    There is no performance loss with this method as each drive writes simultaneously.

    Full Duplex mirroring (2 drives/2 controller cards in case of controller card failure) -not really required for home systems as minimal downtime is not a problem

    RAID5 (Redundant Array of Inexpensive Disks)
    the best solution but the most costly as it requies 5 hard drives to pull it off and in most cases SCSI or some newer format that can manage 5 or more drives.

    The beauty of this puppy is that any four disks contain the partition information of the other drive so any drive failure does not affect your data and a failed drive can be removed and rebuilt on the fly. Its other major advantage is disk striping (Available in RAID3 and above). Any particular file is cut up and a portion written to different disks and retrieved in the same way so on raid 5 you disk read/writing is up to four times faster as 5 drives heads are sharing the file writing/reading load.

    XP has all the technology built in and ready to use in a very simple fashion.

    Let me know if you would like a walkthrough for any particular backup choice / operating system and i will happily oblige.

    All the best,

    DPG

    <font face=verdana size=1 color=43639C>Parasiteware - Any software, process or method that aims to make money by avoiding any involvement in the sales process apart from hijacking transactions that have been created by the hard work of others.</font>

  22. Newsletter Signup

+ Reply to Thread

Similar Threads

  1. Login Failure
    By marbrun in forum Commission Junction - CJ
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: August 6th, 2005, 04:27 AM
  2. Google Bot is hitting hard very Hard!
    By jc101 in forum Search Engine Optimization
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: June 22nd, 2004, 05:30 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •