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  1. #1
    Outsourced Program Manager Sarah Bundy's Avatar
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    Good points from CJ this morning on working with PPC affiliates
    Today I listened to a webinar by Commission Junction on how not working with your paid publishers could be costing you lost opportunities and sales.

    For the few years I’ve been in affiliate marketing I often hear advertisers (merchants) saying they don’t want affiliates bidding on their trademark or direct linking (using their display URL). This is because they see this as direct competition to their brand and their website, stating that the affiliate is grabbing traffic and sales that they should have been getting anyway.

    This could be true if the terms and conditions of your program are unclear or nonexistent. However you’ll find that most affiliates will ask for permission first and come to you for guidance on these matters.

    Commission Junction made some great points in their webinar today that show exactly why you SHOULD work with PPC Publishers and how you can build strategic partnerships with them to ensure you’re not competing against each other while helping each other produce ROI through a better affiliate PPC strategy.

    In summary, here are the major points that show why and how you would want to work with your PPC affiliates:

    1. Choose 1-5 strategy PPC partners that you trust to work with you. Make sure you have you have negotiated your terms and guidelines

    2. If you are going to allow trademark bidding, do so in a way that allows competitive blocking. This means the merchant gets the top spot and your affiliates get to kick out competitors bidding on your TM. With this strategy in place you know that your chances of converting a sale will be better than just allowing your competition to steal your customer away.

    3. Allowing trademark Coupon Searches helps customers find what they need when they know what they want. This doesn’t mean you have to post your coupons everywhere, this just means that someone is delivering what your customer wants when they type in “[your company name] coupon code”.

    4. Google is only able to show one results per URL per search for particular keywords. This means that by allowing direct linking to your display URL will result in either you or your affiliate’s ad showing up for a search. If you communicate your terms at the beginning, then this could actually be a good thing:

    • If affiliates are direct linking banner ads in content networks vs just the text based ads you’re using
    • If affiliates are doing GEO-targeted ad campaigns by region, city, state, zip code or points of interest and you are not
    • If affiliates are conducting Pay Per Click campaigns in other countries your company ships to, such as Germany, Switzerland, and Canada that you are not currently reaching with your paid ads. Each of these countries have their own search engines you are likely not in yet
    • If affiliates are able to reach bilingual users through Google language groups for their campaigns that you are currently not reaching. English is not your only option, nor your only audience
    • If you are only using Tier 1 search engines (such as Google, Yahoo or Bing) and they would like to conduct their ad campaigns on Tier 2 search engines such as Kanoodle, Looksmart, Miva, ePilot, Findology or Ask.com
    • If you only display your ads during certain times of the day because they are higher traffic or produce higher ROI, allow your PPC affiliates to take your off hours to do the same (ie: weekends, graveyard hours)
    • If you have mostly generic or long tail keywords, they can pick up the rest
    • If you have a limited budget and they are able to drive far more traffic and sales to your website than you can
    • If you choose to exclude particular categories or products from your paid campaigns because the ROI isn’t worth the effort for you, affiliates might still be interested in that ROI, even if it’s small.

    The bottom line is there are a ton of opportunities to build a strategic partnership with a select one or few PPC affiliates in your program. They will be able to help you reach search engines and audiences you currently are not.

    Just make sure that you discuss your terms clearly at the beginning. It’s ok to ask for a non disclosure agreement from them if you are sharing keyword lists. Just come up with a compromise and a win win agreement that allows you both to be profitable in the end.

    If anyone has anything to add to this, please do.
    Last edited by Sarah Bundy; August 12th, 2009 at 06:16 PM. Reason: spelling mistake.

  2. #2
    Outsourced Program Manager cmagtoto - SEOP's Avatar
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    We were also on that call today, and are putting together strategies for select search affiliates to run campaigns based on what we heard.

    Working for the advertisers, I've seen this PPC/Trademark discussion over the years. I appreciate the Competitive vs. Complementary Search theme, and got some great actionable tips from the call.

    If there are any PPC affiliates out there, I'd be glad to hear from you AND partner with you for some of our clients. Let me know who you are.

    Thanks all.

  3. #3
    Outsourced Program Manager Sarah Bundy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cmagtoto - SEOP

    If there are any PPC affiliates out there, I'd be glad to hear from you AND partner with you for some of our clients. Let me know who you are.
    We'd love to hear from you too. Feel free to contact us anytime to see what opportunity we have to work together.

    Best,

  4. #4
    Affiliate Manager jclaydon's Avatar
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    imwave and Vertive are pro's at this. I would recommend Wpromote too, if you can manage to get a hold of them.
    [FONT=Arial][B][COLOR=Navy]Jonathan Claydon | [email]jclaydon@real.com[/email][/COLOR] |[COLOR=Gray] Director - Affiliate and Partner Marketing[/COLOR] |[/B] [COLOR=Blue]Real[/COLOR]Networks, Inc.[/FONT]

  5. #5
    Outsourced Program Manager Sarah Bundy's Avatar
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    Ya, for sure, Tony and Andre are two fo my favorite guys.

    There are some affiliates who like to have exclusivity on trademark bidding so keep this in mind when approaching particular publishers (note to merchants / AMs).

  6. #6
    Speechless OTProf's Avatar
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    I completely agree that there can be a win-win middle ground in the PPC arena. Quite a few merchants shifted from little to no rules to a completely closed system. My suggestion is typically that a merchant determine which keywords produce 90-95% of their ROI, blacklist those, and then let a few affiliates scramble for the remaining breadcrumbs! It requires A LOT less compliance work and affiliates (such as me!) can commonly bring in even more revenue by using our experience and tricks of the PPC trade. I also suggest that merchants look at it as a 1-3 month experiment (trial basis) wherein they can still cancel anytime even within the 1-3 months. If it isn't seeming to be win-win then they can pull the plug or adjust things a bit (such as limit to one or two search engines). Approaching things from a trial basis tends to work well as you can usually start quicker and the merchants doesn't feel roped in to something that may not work out as well as hoped. I could ramble on and on about this topic - but suffice to say I am glad that the call went well!!

  7. #7
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    Yeah... that's the ticket ... get your affiliates to spend PPC money, so all the parasites in your program have more links to poach.

  8. #8
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    Hi Sarah,

    It is definitely very informative,thanks for sharing it with us. Now we know the different techniques which we can use so that both the affiliate and we as merchants benefit.So far we have not been working on PPC model, now we may look at it provided my management agrees to it. We have been working only on CPA .

    Cheers

  9. #9
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    Sarah – The AIM Group
    For the few years I’ve been in affiliate marketing I often hear advertisers (merchants) saying they don’t want affiliates bidding on their trademark or direct linking (using their display URL). This is because they see this as direct competition to their brand and their website, stating that the affiliate is grabbing traffic and sales that they should have been getting anyway.
    I'm sorry but how somebody can still listen to CJ. What kind of new crap do they have to sell?
    These damned thieves spent years pushing parasites. I still remember how hard the idiots at CJ were pushing eBates during their first Internet radio show after Haiko gave up.
    Pushing affiliates to STEAL merchants direct traffic is in their best interest, using downloads, toolbars or like now PPC on trademarks.
    These thieves at CJ are trying to monetize everything they can. They don't care for their merchants or their affiliates. They are pushing what's best for them. Period.

    Merchants SHOULD NOT use affiliates to bid on their trademarks. Affiliate marketing is not the channel for that. Why should you pay a third party (CJ) to do nothing, cash in your brand name and confuse other affiliates.
    If a merchant thinks an affiliate is good for PPC and want to subcontract this task, they should use an other tracking system (and an other kind of agreement)

  10. #10
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    PPC affiliates work
    I have been working with several PPC affiliates through CJ and other channels for about 1 year. They consistently deliver high quality traffic and leads.

    I would definitley recommend working with PPC affiliates.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by tadden
    I have been working with several PPC affiliates through CJ and other channels for about 1 year. They consistently deliver high quality traffic and leads.

    I would definitley recommend working with PPC affiliates.
    Why would you like people at ABW to think you're a merchant.
    You're not a merchant. You're AN AFFILIATE.

  12. #12
    Beachy Bill's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by net4biz
    Yeah... that's the ticket ... get your affiliates to spend PPC money, so all the parasites in your program have more links to poach.
    Unfortunately that's the way I'm reading this also. Better for CJ (see Zeus' post) - but not so sure about for affs and merchants.
    Bill / Marketing Blog @ 12PM - Current project: Resurrecting my "baby" at South Baltimore..
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  13. #13
    Affiliate Manager jclaydon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zeus
    I'm sorry but how somebody can still listen to CJ. What kind of new crap do they have to sell?
    These damned thieves spent years pushing parasites. I still remember how hard the idiots at CJ were pushing eBates during their first Internet radio show after Haiko gave up.
    Pushing affiliates to STEAL merchants direct traffic is in their best interest, using downloads, toolbars or like now PPC on trademarks.
    These thieves at CJ are trying to monetize everything they can. They don't care for their merchants or their affiliates. They are pushing what's best for them. Period.

    Merchants SHOULD NOT use affiliates to bid on their trademarks. Affiliate marketing is not the channel for that. Why should you pay a third party (CJ) to do nothing, cash in your brand name and confuse other affiliates.
    If a merchant thinks an affiliate is good for PPC and want to subcontract this task, they should use an other tracking system (and an other kind of agreement)

    Zeus -

    I know you're experienced in this field, and admittedly seem to have been involved in affiliate marketing longer than I have, but I have to call you out here.

    You are wrong, and you're being ignorant.

    For one, I know you didn't watch the Webinar, or bother to read Sarah's notes in her original post. This blind prejudice against all things CJ is childish, misconceived, and completely irrational. Outside parties who don't understand affiliate marketing come here and see posts like this and are further dissuaded from engaging in a very credible form of marketing.

    The presentation was not an attempt to subvert internal search campaigns, but rather to supplement those campaigns if the conditions fit. In certain cases, that may warrant working with a quality search firm like imwave or Vertive to use display URL, or TM bid. Re-read Sarah's post, or watch the replay of the webinar and come up with some constructive criticism besides wildly ranting conspiracy theories to give yourself some credibility.
    [FONT=Arial][B][COLOR=Navy]Jonathan Claydon | [email]jclaydon@real.com[/email][/COLOR] |[COLOR=Gray] Director - Affiliate and Partner Marketing[/COLOR] |[/B] [COLOR=Blue]Real[/COLOR]Networks, Inc.[/FONT]

  14. #14
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    Affiliates, let me tell you why you should not let your merchants use a few affiliates bid on their TM brand names.
    As an affiliate you promote these merchants and you get a compensation composed of a commission and return days.
    Return days should be quite an important part of your income. I've seen for some merchants as high as 25% of my commissions coming from cookies.
    You're working hard and you're spending your money to drive traffic to your merchants, either SEO, Social Networking or PPC. It works, and the visitors are on your site. Now, you have two cases, either your visitors buy right away and there's no problem, or more likely, they will come back after thinking about their purchase.
    Your return days should allow you a commission if your visitors click directly on the merchant brand name after a search. If your merchant uses an affiliate to bid on their TM brand name, more likely your cookie will be overwritten and you can kiss good bye your commissions after doing all the hard work.

    Nothing new. It's what these crooks at CJ have been promoting for years, parasites, toolbars, they all void your return days.
    Return days are part of your paycheck.
    If I see one of my merchants using this trick pushed by CJ, they will have to find a new affiliate.

    jclaydon
    We saw from where you're coming from, we know what you did before.

  15. #15
    Affiliate Manager jclaydon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zeus
    Affiliates, let me tell you why you should not let your merchants use a few affiliates bid on their TM brand names.
    As an affiliate you promote these merchants and you get a compensation composed of a commission and return days.
    Return days should be quite an important part of your income. I've seen for some merchants as high as 25% of my commissions coming from cookies.
    You're working hard and you're spending your money to drive traffic to your merchants, either SEO, Social Networking or PPC. It works, and the visitors are on your site. Now, you have two cases, either your visitors buy right away and there's no problem, or more likely, they will come back after thinking about their purchase.
    Your return days should allow you a commission if your visitors click directly on the merchant brand name after a search. If your merchant uses an affiliate to bid on their TM brand name, more likely your cookie will be overwritten and you can kiss good bye your commissions after doing all the hard work.

    Nothing new. It's what these crooks at CJ have been promoting for years, parasites, toolbars, they all void your return days.
    Return days are part of your paycheck.
    If I see one of my merchants using this trick pushed by CJ, they will have to find a new affiliate.

    jclaydon
    We saw from where you're coming from, we know what you did before.

    Ok so again, you missed the entire point of the webinar. And you again, didn't read the OP.

    The concept of TM bidding was one of seven or eight strategies that were discussed, and TM bidding was suggested only in the event that there are a number of competitors bidding on a merchants trademarks: this is a good example: http://www.google.com/#hl=en&safe=of...77bb8bebb07f34

    To your point of losing commissions if someone does a TM search - you do realize that if someone hits an internal search ad you aren't going to be compensated, right? Any decently sized company is going to map different channels and fire pixels based on the traffic source.

    The rest of the discussion surrounded other strategies like day-parting, second tier search engines, profitibility marks, bilingual searches, etc. This, wasn't some attempt to steal your commissions, it was a well put together presentation on using the power of search affiliates to drive incremental revenue.
    [FONT=Arial][B][COLOR=Navy]Jonathan Claydon | [email]jclaydon@real.com[/email][/COLOR] |[COLOR=Gray] Director - Affiliate and Partner Marketing[/COLOR] |[/B] [COLOR=Blue]Real[/COLOR]Networks, Inc.[/FONT]

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by jclaydon
    Zeus -

    I know you're experienced in this field, and admittedly seem to have been involved in affiliate marketing longer than I have, but I have to call you out here.

    You are wrong, and you're being ignorant.

    For one, I know you didn't watch the Webinar, or bother to read Sarah's notes in her original post. This blind prejudice against all things CJ is childish, misconceived, and completely irrational. Outside parties who don't understand affiliate marketing come here and see posts like this and are further dissuaded from engaging in a very credible form of marketing.

    The presentation was not an attempt to subvert internal search campaigns, but rather to supplement those campaigns if the conditions fit. In certain cases, that may warrant working with a quality search firm like imwave or Vertive to use display URL, or TM bid. Re-read Sarah's post, or watch the replay of the webinar and come up with some constructive criticism besides wildly ranting conspiracy theories to give yourself some credibility.
    You're right about ONE thing.
    I've been in that business from DAY ONE and I've been VERY successful because I've been able to avoid people like YOU all my life.

    Most of my posts are about exposing bad practices, cheating merchants or telling new affiliates what to avoid to make a living with Affilliate marketing. I'm not trying to make friends at ABW or to please posters misleading affiliates.
    "Outside parties who don't understand affiliate marketing come here and see posts like this and are further dissuaded from engaging in a very credible form of marketing. "
    Sorry but what's your credible form of marketing. Loyalty business, downloads, toolbars, TM PPC?

  17. #17
    ABW Ambassador Joshua's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zeus
    You're right about ONE thing.
    I've been in that business from DAY ONE and I've been VERY successful because I've been able to avoid people like YOU all my life.

    Most of my posts are about exposing bad practices, cheating merchants or telling new affiliates what to avoid to make a living with Affilliate marketing. I'm not trying to make friends at ABW or to please posters misleading affiliates.
    "Outside parties who don't understand affiliate marketing come here and see posts like this and are further dissuaded from engaging in a very credible form of marketing. "
    Sorry but what's your credible form of marketing. Loyalty business, downloads, toolbars, TM PPC?
    You have no idea what you're talking about. Jclaydon has some very good posts here. I know from experience.

    If you're a brand that has a lot of competitors on your brand searches, it helps immensely to have affiliates in the space. From experience, I can say that this does increase overall sales from a keyword. Especially now with Google's relaxed trademark policy, allowing competitors to come in to the space using the brand name in ads, in a comparative manner, it's more important than ever to consider allowing affiliates on brand terms. Right now, I'm not on the merchant end where we have traditional affiliates, but in the fields that I'm in, having our partner sites take up additional search positions on brand terms (and getting them on to competitor terms, as part of the tradeoff) has been invaluable to removing competitors from the marketplace and increasing sales.

    If a merchant correctly uses last-click-gets-the-sale methodology among all channels (which should be the case - one channel should never favor another), it doesn't matter whether affiliates or in-house (or both) links are used in search.

    In the number of companies I've worked with over the past few years dealing with affiliate (parasite-free) and search, I've used nearly all of those points that Sarah posted, and I know the value that lies therein. Having an affiliate partner do the work for international, multi-language campaigns and landing pages is much more affordable and demanding than doing it in-house (unless you're a language learning company). Affiliates can deal with the crap that comes with third-tier engines, while I can spend my time on the bigger engines. Affiliates can keep out competitors without increasing in-house search cost, if correct partners are chosen (jclaydon's examples prove to me that he knows who to work with).

  18. #18
    Outsourced Program Manager Sarah Bundy's Avatar
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    Hi guys, you all make good points here. Zeus, thank you for your feedback on the issue as all your points are very valid. I think the main point of the post that everyone is missing was this:

    "The bottom line is there are a ton of opportunities to build a strategic partnership with a select one or few PPC affiliates in your program. They will be able to help you reach search engines and audiences you currently are not."

    Affiliates need to use some form of marketing their websites whether it be SEO, email lists, or PPC as examples. There are a lot of affiliates out there who do use PPC as one of their forms of marketing and I think there are some good points up there whether a merchant allows direct linking or TM bidding or not.

    I was hoping that affiliates would be looking at those tips as well (ie: category and product bidding, international bidding, bilingual bidding, etc) to help them get ideas of how they could improve their traffic flow and results.

  19. #19
    Analytics Dude Kevin's Avatar
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    Personally, I don't mind trademark bidding when allowed by the merchant (as opposed to trademark poaching, when it's not.)

    If anything, large company's should learn from the mistakes made by Kodak, who became so consumed with preventing the dissolution of their brand that they cornered themselves.

    The internet is a big place, and it's near impossible for any one person or group of people in one room to consider all the places your brand might benefit from being.

    Utilizing the affiliate channel to get your brand in front of more NEW customers is a good thing. However, once that brand had captured that customer, I believe it's up to them to keep them coming back through bookmarks, email campaigns, social media and direct type ins.

    To that end, opening up PPC brand bidding is a good thing. If you are a new brand however, with minimal searches done for it, that might change the equation. It all depends what PPC ads are showing on your brand searches. (and, to a large degree, if you have a "keyword laden" brand.... like Bob'sipods . com.... that you'll need to cover any way you can.)
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  20. #20
    Affiliate Manager jclaydon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zeus
    You're right about ONE thing.
    I've been in that business from DAY ONE and I've been VERY successful because I've been able to avoid people like YOU all my life.

    Most of my posts are about exposing bad practices, cheating merchants or telling new affiliates what to avoid to make a living with Affilliate marketing. I'm not trying to make friends at ABW or to please posters misleading affiliates.
    "Outside parties who don't understand affiliate marketing come here and see posts like this and are further dissuaded from engaging in a very credible form of marketing. "
    Sorry but what's your credible form of marketing. Loyalty business, downloads, toolbars, TM PPC?
    Look, I'm sure you're a good affiliate - I wish I had some concept of what you actually do, but everyone here loves to hide behind anonymity. I've seen you make some very insightful and intelligent posts, but when it comes to ANYTHING regarding the larger networks it's 100% negative rambling - I feel like I'm listening to Dick Cheney speak when I read these forums sometimes. Instead of "WMDs, Terror, and threats to national security" all I hear is "Parasites, the networks are out to cheat you, and cookie hijacking."

    I think you've all been sitting here drinking the Kool-Aid for way too long, and when you are presented with any sort of tangible evidence that refutes what you believe any sort of logical discussion goes out the window.

    With regards to PPC, all I can derive from your objection is that any affiliate PPC hurts YOUR business. How you came to that conclusion, I don't know, but from a merchant perspective in my experience the concepts that were discussed in that presentation are effective and complimentary to internal campaigns.
    [FONT=Arial][B][COLOR=Navy]Jonathan Claydon | [email]jclaydon@real.com[/email][/COLOR] |[COLOR=Gray] Director - Affiliate and Partner Marketing[/COLOR] |[/B] [COLOR=Blue]Real[/COLOR]Networks, Inc.[/FONT]

  21. #21
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    Joshua -You have no idea what you're talking about. Jclaydon has some very good posts here. I know from experience.
    I read some of his posts in the Dick Blick thread and I don't agree at all but I'm not astonished you're sticking together. You're coming from the same world, and it's not mine.
    As an affiliate, I know what's good and what works for me.
    I don't mind and I don't care about affiliates using PPC, other forms of marketing and their different strategies. I don't mind as long as it's not changing the basic rules of affiliate marketing and it's not interfering with my business.

  22. #22
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    But Zeus one of the basic rules of affiliate marketing is your cookie can be overwritten at anytime and by perfectly legit methods.

    As far as TM bidding, that's a topic that has been gone over to death over the years and I don't think there is or should be any set rule as far as that goes because not all merchants are the same. And the examples I've always used where I think TM bidding is good and even makes sense is if a merchant has other merchants bidding on their TM, affiliates can bump them and take those spots. And cases where the merchants domain or TM is the product. As an example the Flip camera program. There is a thread here where I pointed out their PPC rules didn't make much sense and they opened it up where affiliates could bid on the TM. And there are cases like Ugg Australia, computer merchants (dell, gateway, apple etc.)

    Also Zeus, forget TM bidding for a second. From your posts I gather you mainly push products. Well somebody can go to your site, click a product link setting a cookie but don't buy. But you're ok with affiliates doing PPC for products right? Well, those affiliates could be doing PPC for the same products you just got that click/cookie for so your cookie can be overwritten in cases like that as well.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by jclaydon
    Look, I'm sure you're a good affiliate - I wish I had some concept of what you actually do, but everyone here loves to hide behind anonymity. I've seen you make some very insightful and intelligent posts, but when it comes to ANYTHING regarding the larger networks it's 100% negative rambling - I feel like I'm listening to Dick Cheney speak when I read these forums sometimes. Instead of "WMDs, Terror, and threats to national security" all I hear is "Parasites, the networks are out to cheat you, and cookie hijacking."

    I think you've all been sitting here drinking the Kool-Aid for way too long, and when you are presented with any sort of tangible evidence that refutes what you believe any sort of logical discussion goes out the window.

    With regards to PPC, all I can derive from your objection is that any affiliate PPC hurts YOUR business. How you came to that conclusion, I don't know, but from a merchant perspective in my experience the concepts that were discussed in that presentation are effective and complimentary to internal campaigns.
    I'm one of the first affiliates at LS and CJ and I made more money with them that most people here will make in their life. So, I should be happy like hell, brag about how great they are, seat in their suites during AS and write an ebook to push newbies to join them.
    I can say that everything you read in the parasite section at ABW is true. You like it or not. It's my own experience. I'm sure you never had a parasite popping on your sites all day long and you never had people knocking at your door to try to intimidate you. You can't have the same experience.
    Who loves to hide behind anonymity? Your name don't tell me the kind of person you are. Don't you think most AMs at ABW know who I am and my activities.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trust
    But Zeus one of the basic rules of affiliate marketing is your cookie can be overwritten at anytime and by perfectly legit methods.

    As far as TM bidding, that's a topic that has been gone over to death over the years and I don't think there is or should be any set rule as far as that goes because not all merchants are the same. And the examples I've always used where I think TM bidding is good and even makes sense is if a merchant has other merchants bidding on their TM, affiliates can bump them and take those spots. And cases where the merchants domain or TM is the product. As an example the Flip camera program. There is a thread here where I pointed out their PPC rules didn't make much sense and they opened it up where affiliates could bid on the TM. And there are cases like Ugg Australia, computer merchants (dell, gateway, apple etc.)

    Also Zeus, forget TM bidding for a second. From your posts I gather you mainly push products. Well somebody can go to your site, click a product link setting a cookie but don't buy. But you're ok with affiliates doing PPC for products right? Well, those affiliates could be doing PPC for the same products you just got that click/cookie for so your cookie can be overwritten in cases like that as well.
    I agree. One of the basic rules of affiliate marketing is your cookie can be overwritten at anytime by perfectly legit methods.
    Now the hard part, what are perfectly legit methods?
    Regarding TM, either a merchant accept that ALL their affiliates can bid or NONE. I don't consider using just a few affiliates as acceptable.
    For me it's like when Merchants are using SecondBite (an affiliate) on their cart or sending newsletters overwritting cookies with an affiliate link or using affiliates for other tasks that should be done by them (without overwritting our cookies).

    Yes, I push products and if an other affiliate bid on the same product and overwrite my cookie, I've no problem with that.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zeus
    Regarding TM, either a merchant accept that ALL their affiliates can bid or NONE. I don't consider accepting just a few affiliate is acceptable.
    I'm with Zeus on this.

    Merchants should set the PPC rules straight forward -- open ppc policy, partially open policy, no ppc at all...it's up to merchants. But, once the rule set, it should be equally applied to all affiliates.

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