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  1. #1
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    Cool. 'Bout time!!!!

    Washington Post

  2. #2
    http and a telephoto
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    I'm sorry, but my opt-in newsletters have been blocked by AOL. If they block email from small opt-in newsletters I can only imagine what sites they are blocking as spammers..... If they blocked the real spammers it would be great, but AOL basically blocks what they feel like blocking on any given day.

    And they consider any email that *conforms* to CAN-SPAM regulations to *be* spam.

    AOL users will not be happy when they can't connect to many of their favorite sites. Maybe they want everyone that has a website to sign up for their service so we can see if our own sites are banned....
    Deborah Carney
    TeamLoxly.com BookGoodies.com ABCsPlus.com

  3. #3
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    I agree with Deborah not everything is SPAM.

    Scenario:
    Hubbie rushes in to my home office and asks me what is up with his email account. I sat there looking at him with a very dumb look on my face -- what do you mean? --

    He goes on to explain that he is now responsible for passing around the illegal office pool. (Can now understand email importance) He sent his spreadsheet from work to home and he cannot open it up.

    I immediately understand his rush and panic, so I try to figure out his dilemma.

    "Honey what account did you send it from?"
    AOL or my spammy email? He said AOL and my spammy email.

    Apparently both crappy email programs would not let him open the attachment; the attachment is considered spam or a virus. Since he's looking very panicked I ask him to send me the email with attachment.

    As I do not use AOL or my own spammy email, I was able to open up his spreadsheet with no problem.

    Solution: I handed him an old fashioned diskette with his spreadsheet on it.


    NOT EVERYTHING IS SPAM!

  4. #4
    http and a telephoto
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    I am actually sending this link to some of my friends with AOL accounts, and hoping that they get it. And then they can flood AOL with protests about curtailing their freedom to choose what sites they visit.

    Something needs to be done, but this ain't it...
    Deborah Carney
    TeamLoxly.com BookGoodies.com ABCsPlus.com

  5. #5
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    I get 200+ spams per day. I hope AOL's actions puts them all out of business.

  6. #6
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    bob95603,

    Aol's tactics are not going to resolve this issue. Its not the little guys causing the problem. My own domain is now on every blacklist imaginable for spamming people. I have NEVER EVER sent out any email campaigns with my domain.

    The REAL SPAMMERS simply take everyone else’s domains and shoot there SPAM using FALSE representation. Hell even the big boys get zapped by these SPAMMERS.

    Remember getting spam from Yahoo?

    If AOL has there way you would not be able to see the Yahoo site, what AOL is doing is called censorship under the guise of protection. You may one day regret what you sole heartedly want right now.

  7. #7
    http and a telephoto
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    200 spams a day is chump change. If you have an address on the web and you are in the search engines it is a sign that you are being found if you get spam. I get a couple of thousand a day across all my email addresses. It is a cost of doing business on the web. Do I want it to stop? Yes. Do I think AOL blocking sites will help? ABSOLUTELY NOT.

    And like I said, and will say again, and again and again, AOL cannot tell the difference between spam and legitimate email, they block legitimate email, and now they will block access to legitimate websites. And the big spammers will not see any difference, because there emails already do not get to AOL users.

    Censorship is NOT the way to get rid of spam.

    If you send a newsletter of any size at all, *your* site will be blocked. And the AOL users *do not know* that your site is being blocked by them, they think it is offline.

    AOL should stand up and deliver a page that states "We think this is a spammers website and we are blocking your access to this site." And then there should be a button to continue or not.

    I will stop ranting and will let this go, but you and others need to realize what this really means. It is a denial of rights for people that are paying for a service. Other isp's have been shut down for doing this to their customers.

    I am not the only one that has had problems with AOL, start paying attention to the number of websites that have posted notices for their AOL visitors explaining that emails sent to AOL addresses get bounced. Not just small sites, but large ones, with the notices posted big and bold on their customer service pages because people end up trash talking about sites for not responding to customer service emails. The sites sent the emails, the customer didn't get them. No notice from AOL to the customer that emails to them were bounced because AOL thought they were spam.
    Deborah Carney
    TeamLoxly.com BookGoodies.com ABCsPlus.com

  8. #8
    http and a telephoto
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    Sandra brought up a point that I forgot and also have personal experience with, my email addresses are spoofed all over the net! I get spam from one of my addresses to the other almost every day and I DON'T SEND EMAIL ADVERTISING!

    Like Sandra and many, many others, our sites are on Blacklists for absolutely no reason. Because the people reporting and the people creating the blacklists don't look at the email headers to see where the damn email really came from!!!!!
    Deborah Carney
    TeamLoxly.com BookGoodies.com ABCsPlus.com

  9. #9
    Full Member garystarling's Avatar
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    To see if you are on a blacklist Spamcop. Domain names are not blocked - IP addresses are. Try also Senderbase

    If you are listed and do not send spam, check to see if your server is badly configured and being used as an open relay. Ordb.org.

    The latter once fixed should get you off any spam lists.

  10. #10
    ABW Ambassador Andy's Avatar
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    I appreciate what AOL is attempting to do, but they aren't going about it in the right way. There are a lot of legitimate opt in E-mail based newsletters, welcome by the people who signed up to receive them.

    I doubt this will last long, once AOL users realize that AOL is censoring the Internet on their behalf. And it's only a matter of time before people get tired of discovering friends have send them messages to their AOL account, but they never got them.

    Change will happen, sooner or later.

    I do wish there was an easy way to put a stop to SPAM, but until our Governments worldwide get together and decide to put an end to it, it will continue. I'm still amazed that there are people out there stupid enough to do business with spammers. They need to just die and get out of the gene pool.

    Andy

    <--SPAMMERS

  11. #11
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    Spoofing emails is kids play for most spammers.

    It's happened to me a few times with my AOL account...

    If you call AOL and speak to a rep and tell them what happened, they can unblock you.

    It's easy to fix the spam problem...you simply make it manddatory every ISP disables the mass mailing features for all email sent outside the domain name...I.e. if you are company with x.com as a domain name you can mass mail to only that domain name...all other mailings must be sent ONE at a time.

    Then I wouldn't get spammed every day by Tiger Direct and get 50 to 100 ads for permanent woody pills - like I can use them.

  12. #12
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    And, what a great way to get your competitors site banned, just buy a list of AOL Addresses and spam the heck out of them with your competitors site. Bad idea. AOL=Kindernet.

  13. #13
    2005 Linkshare Golden Link Award Winner  ecomcity's Avatar
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    Sure hope that AOL -Yahoo and Hotmail all ban all affiliate enabled merchants newsletters, specials and coupon codes. Make the shopper have to come through our sites more often.
    Webmaster's... Mike and Charlie

    "What have you done today to put real value into a referral click...from a shoppers viewpoint!"

  14. #14
    2005 Linkshare Golden Link Award Winner  ecomcity's Avatar
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    "America Online Inc. has adopted a new tactic against spam: blocking its members’ ability to see Web sites promoted by bulk e-mailers.

    The policy, which began earlier this year, opens a new front in the war on spam but also makes the Dulles, Va., company the first of its kind to push past the traditional Internet orthodoxy that service providers should be neutral conduits to anything the World Wide Web has to offer.

    Many spammers advertise products -- including body-enhancement pills, pirated software and get-rich-quick schemes -- by including links in their e-mail to Internet sites that display the wares and process orders. AOL members attempting to visit a blocked Web page receive an error message that says a connection to the page could not be made, but are not told that it is a spammer’s site that has been placed off limits. No other notification of the policy is provided.

    “Essentially, we have vastly improved AOL’s ability to restrict identified spammers’ sites from being accessed by our members online,” said company spokesman Nicholas Graham. He said AOL is choosing which sites to block based on complaints from its members, who can report spam that they receive to the company.

    Graham said the Web site blocking policy has contributed to, for the first time, a reduction in the amount of bulk mail that spammers are trying to send to its members.

    The move highlights the fact that Internet providers have the ability to block users from seeing certain content. Indeed, in trying to short-circuit the income stream of spammers, AOL is attacking one of the most vexing truths about the spam problem: Some people want and buy the products, which helps keeps the spammers in business.

    “There is a service to AOL members by doing this,” said Paul Smith, a Washington lawyer who specializes in Internet and media law. “But there’s some trade-off ... because some people want to go to those sites. It shows that there can be in the world of the Internet some serious issues raised by a small number of companies that (control) bottlenecks to the flow of information.”

    Although AOL has joined hands with Internet service competitors EarthLink Inc., Microsoft Corp. and Yahoo Inc. to sue spammers and to develop new technologies for blocking spam, AOL is alone in its move to try to cut off access to commerce Web sites advertised via spam.

    EarthLink spokeswoman Carla Shaw said her service has begun to block Web sites that are linked from spam that purports to be from EarthLink. In a scam known as phishing, the e-mail directs users to sites that look like they are EarthLink’s and asks for personal data. AOL has blocked phishing sites for about a year."

    Appears the consumers are forcing the penalities on anything they consider spam. Baby and bathwater both get thrown out. Remember what I've always said about putting a real value in a click. Many billions of spamms later ...some don't know the meaning of "real value". Mass reach advertising playing the old numbers game seems to upset the general buying public, which don't give a rats ass about your Adnausium pushing your products in front of their noses 24/7. Less desperate tactics will obviously please consumers ...when they're ready.
    Webmaster's... Mike and Charlie

    "What have you done today to put real value into a referral click...from a shoppers viewpoint!"

  15. #15
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    If they're using an automated process or un-trained personnel to detect the "source" of the spamvertised site, I hope they're if properly.

    I had a domain joe-jobbed within a spam.

    The domain of the spam selling site was <keyword>-<blah>.biz

    The spammers place my domain <keyword>.com and someone elses domain <keyword>.net as HTML links in the email, but with no text to show it - [a href="http://blah"][/a] - so it didn't show on the email, but spamcop saw it as a clickable link and put us in their database.

    Grrrr.

  16. #16
    2005 Linkshare Golden Link Award Winner  ecomcity's Avatar
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    Well the networks and the merchnat AM's have to face the reality of letting the Duper list brokers and e-mail spammers freely operate within their ranks. Heck merchants are NETorious spammers in their own greedy quest to shove Ad up the snouts of their customers suffering from Adnausium nose bleeds.


    Email Usage Down. Consumer Mistrust Up. Spamming Remains Viable.

    The Pew Internet & Life Project released a study on St. Paddy's Day which is revealing.

    The highlights are as follows:

    "The distress of Internet users at spam has increased in recent months and growing numbers of Internet users are becoming disillusioned with email, despite the first national anti-spam legislation which went into effect on January 1.

    A new survey by the Pew Internet & American Life Project between February 3 and March 1, 2004 shows the following:

    # 29% of email users say they have reduced their overall use of email because of spam. That figure is an increase from last June, when we found that 25% of emailers were reporting a reduction in their email use.
    # 63% of email users said that the influx of spam made them less trusting of email in general. That figure is higher than the 52% of email users who reported declining trust in email in June.
    # 77% of emailers said the flood of spam made the act of being online unpleasant and annoying. That is an increase from the 70% of those who said in June that spam was making online experiences unpleasant and annoying.
    # 42% of email users said they were aware that Congress and the Administration had approved anti-spam legislation and that it had gone into effect at the beginning of the year.

    In all, 86% of email users reported some level of distress with spam.

    The impact of the CAN-SPAM legislation is mixed, but not very encouraging so far. The vast majority of email users report no change in the volume of spam arriving in the in-boxes of either their personal or work-related accounts. A slightly larger percentage of email users report their volume of incoming spam has actually increased rather than decreased since January 1. At the same time, some email users say they are getting less spam both in their personal email accounts and in their work accounts.

    Fully 71% of those with email accounts report that they have received pornographic spam. And the one area where the CAN-SPAM Act seemed to be having a somewhat clearer effect involved porn. Of those who had gotten pornography in the past, 25% say they are getting less porn spam now. That compares to 16% who say they are getting more and 56% who say they notice no change. The CAN-SPAM Act explicitly states that pornographic spam must be identified by the subject line as containing adult content in the message.
    Webmaster's... Mike and Charlie

    "What have you done today to put real value into a referral click...from a shoppers viewpoint!"

  17. #17
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    What we have here is a problem of understanding.

    People, in general, think, as William Gibson in Necromancer, information seeks to be free. Or to simpify it that information should be free.

    On the net, information may really be free, but the vehicle to deliver the information - bandwidth - is not.

    And like anything else that costs money, the guy paying the bill usually has the right to say who can use it and how much it costs.

    It's really not unlike the phone system. Part of the cost is an origination and connection fee and part is a destination connection fee.

    Cell phones get you for money on both ends, but land lines usually put all the costs on the origination end.

    Spam uses bandwidth going out and bandwidth coming in.

    AOL has every right to block any email it desires because the pay the bandwidth on their end. But they do so thru customer subscription fees, so they have a balancing act to deal with - how free should I let the information flow be? Too much restriction and subscribers go somewhere else. Too little and the system gets buried in spam.

    One way to cut down on spam is to force people to use specific subject headers, i.e something like - Message from XYZ (persons name) at abc.com or - Message from abc.com

    The actual subject of the message is in the first line of the actual email and the ISP attaches the orginating numerical URL to the email.

    Something like that might work.

  18. #18
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    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>I appreciate what AOL is attempting to do <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    AOL is trying to cut down on their e-mail processing costs. This is the main reason, not their urge to protect their users from spam.

    What makes things worse is the fact that AOL customer base consists of people who know nothing about the internet, so presenting them a notice about bounces will do more harm.

    When a Joe CreditCard SixPack, that truly believes that his e-mail address is either "joe12323@aol" or "joe12323" and that the Internet==AOL sees a notice about bounces that says he might not receive his e-mail confirmation - he panics and just goes elsewhere to make his purchase. So your conversion rate goes down.

    Don't believe me - run a split test.

  19. #19
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    We need a new email protocol...

    SMTP should be retired!

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