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  1. #1
    Newbie CowboyCNet's Avatar
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    One of my techs was discussing using or hearing about using Tag code to increase site popularity on search engines.
    Example: < a href="http://www.cnn.com?cowboy connect" >
    The key words "cowboy connect" would be linked to cnn's key words when crawled and reflect this in search engine position.
    Sounds grey or close to getting banned to me.

  2. #2
    MasterMike HardwareGeek's Avatar
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    I tend to put ?blahblah after a link so that the person who I linked to can see where the person came from. I also ask that people link to me that way

  3. #3
    Newbie CowboyCNet's Avatar
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    Thanks Mikey,

    I have been doing some research:

    Quote From Garrett
    WebPro Veteran

    "AussieWebmaster claims to have spoken with Google directly and learned that "placing title tags inside the href tag will improve optimization."

    He said that he's "slowly integrating" these link titles and it may be "helping a little with terms that were floating on second pages moving them up slightly."

    JayDrake gave an example of what a title tag within an href would look like:
    Buy Cheese!

    AndiLinks wondered if it would "be better to provide an alternate title rather than just repeating the anchor text?"

    Here's her example:
    Buy Cheese!

    "Titles," she points out, "can be longer and more complex than anchor text because they don't eat up valuable screen real estate..."

    Krapulator points out the original purpose of the link titles is to add more information about the nature of the link itself. (Which is pretty much what the W3C have to say on Link Titles.)

    "Thus correct usage," said Krapulator, "would be closer to:"
    Buy Cheese!

    So, If you're feeling high-risk you could stuff your titles with keywords - I wouldn't advise it though, as the overall benefit (if there even is a benefit - I've seen no solid evidence) is liable to be quite small. Though I've never heard of anyone getting banned for link title stuffing, I'd say they're best used in the interest of your site visitors. Mostly."

    Hey guys this is getting interesting.

    Be back soon with more.

  4. #4
    notary sojac Herb ԿԬ's Avatar
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    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> Example: < a href="http://www.cnn.com?cowboy connect" >
    <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    parallel to that, isn't there a recent phenomenom that is similar called googlebombing?

  5. #5
    Resident Genius and Staunch Capitalist Leader's Avatar
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    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by CowboyCNet:
    One of my techs was discussing using or hearing about using Tag code to increase site popularity on search engines.
    Example: < a href="http://www.cnn.com?cowboy connect" >
    The key words "cowboy connect" would be linked to cnn's key words when crawled and reflect this in search engine position.
    Sounds grey or close to getting banned to me. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    I've seen this one, and the results of a test on the idea, on an SEO-related forum.

    What happened was, CNN itself began to rank for the test term attached to it's link! So unless you want CNN to start coming up under "Cowboy Connect" I wouldn't advise using this "trick"...
    There is no knowledge that is not power. ~Hemingway

  6. #6
    Newbie CowboyCNet's Avatar
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    Thanks Herb and Leader,

    Yes its googlebombing

    Link to topic on WebProWorld

    Here is what else I found:

    On the 6th of May Philipp Lenssen of Google Blogoscoped started an experiment. He added a false parameter and keyword to a link to a high PR site to see if the site would appear for the key phrase. His test was http://www.cnn.com/?-gmail-account.

    The parameter is false but does not break the CNN page. He created a single link on his blog like this: http://www.cnn.com/?-gmail-account.

    At the time of the first Blogoscope post there were 148,000 pages for the term "Gmail Account."

    Yesterday Blogoscope reported that, for the search term "Gmail Account," CNN shows up at #14 in Google.

    Today CNN appears in the 18th position for this term, and the url it shows is, of course, www.cnn.com/?-gmail-account. Incidentally there are only 102,000 pages for that term now.

    (Yahoo returned 250,000 results and CNN didn't appear in the top 200 results.)

    WooHoo! Let's start bombing!

    I first tried to bomb http://www.google.com/?-teoma-rules, but that leads to a 404 page (though it's a 404 with a PR of 10...).

    Scott, who creates our daily WebProNews images (like this one) and discusses risky seo tactics with me, pointed out that you can use a "#" in place of a "?" and not break the page.

    And so, here's http://www.google.com/#-Teoma-Rules. I've not seen the "#" tested so we'll see what happens.

    To double check I'll also create this little bomb and see what happens: http://www.yahoo.com/#-Teoma-Rules

    And now for the one I'm more certain will work: http://www.yahoo.com/?Teoma-Rules

    While I'm bombing I may as well hit this way too: Teoma Rules.

    As of 5-14-04 there are 32,300 pages for "Teoma Rules." This should be much easier to rank for than Philipp's "Gmail Account."
    _________________
    Garrett French
    Editor, WebProNews.com
    ______________________


    Interesting, well I now know what my techs do for hours at the shop. Reseach and more resaerch, I'm putting cameras in "LOL".
    I'll keep safe.

  7. #7
    Newbie CowboyCNet's Avatar
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    For many competitive areas these days focusing on content alone won't work and more hardcore techniques may be required. As long as clients are aware of all the risks involved personally I can't see a problem.

    This is what I've heard other people say.

    Are these statements accurate?

    Blackhat:
    Blog Spam
    Cloaking
    Tricky Re-directs
    Black Hat SEO stops at "nothing" to get a high ranking.
    People not following the google guidelines.

    White Hat:
    Content, Content, Content
    Relevant backlinks
    Site maps
    White Hat SEO follows the Google quality guidelines (and the equivalent at other engines) to the letter.

    99% of the SEO industry are wearing hats in various shades of grey.
    Gray Hat = what Black Hat people call themselves.

    Well my obsession with ranking continues at the cost of sleep.

    Ride that horse hard but don’t put her away wet and tired.

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