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  1. #1
    CPA Network Rep JP Sauve's Avatar
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    Just how long have you been working online? Remember any or all of these....

    All Advantage
    Infoseek.com
    14.4 Dial up modems
    Free domain name registration (this was before my time)
    Network Solutions charging $100 per domain.
    Pets.com & Computer.com spend Millions for Superbowl ads. (more than half their venture captial)
    Treeloot.com punch the monkey campaign.
    TshirtNews
    Bach Systems
    Free Yahoo directory listings (that mattered!)
    Alpha sorting of Yahoo directories (with hundres of sites called "100% Whatever" getting listed first)
    Teknosurf
    CJ charging 20% fees instead of 30%.
    AltaVista.com sold for $3.3 Million.
    Pets.com & Computer.com spend Millions for Superbowl ads. (more than half their venture captial)
    [font=verdana][b][size=3][color=red]Are you familiar with [URL]MaxBounty.com[/URL] yet?[/color][/b][/size][/font][font=verdana][b][size=1][color=black]
    • Over 120 merchants with CPA/CPS programs seeking affiliates
    • Over 4500 network publishers seeking programs to advertise
    • Earn $100 per merchant and 5% per affiliate on the second tier [/b][/color][/size][/font]

  2. #2
    ABW Ambassador
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    If you typed ALL CAPS people would yell at you!!!

  3. #3
    Roll Tide mobilebadboy's Avatar
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    14.4 modems?

    I still have my 1200 & 2400 baud modems. I remember when Prodigy and Compuserve charged by THE HOUR and PER EMAIL, and I ran them on an old 8808 DOS machine.

    Shawn Kerr (.com) | Disney World | SEC Football

  4. #4
    Troll Killer and best Snooper!
    I decide when the pigs fly!
    Rhea's Avatar
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    Anybody remember back in the day when AOL *only* gave you 80 free hours to test-drive them?

  5. #5
    ABW Ambassador
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    We were living in Portland Oregon and I needed an ISP
    I read about some guy who started Teleport [now part of Earthlink]

    So I got in my car and drove to his SMALL office and wrote him a check and met his 2 CS reps.
    At the time they did not offer hosting.

  6. #6
    15 years and counting
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    I still have my
    ZX80 then ZX81, Sinclair
    TI89, Texas
    Pet, Commodore
    TRS80, Tandy
    Built my first PC with a 6800 Motorola, had to wrote my own OS, before CPM then Dos.
    My first modem was a fast 75 baud.
    I still remember it, like it was yesterday.
    I'm missing the people from Mindspring who were so helpful at the beginning of Internet.

  7. #7
    Yup, Sure ... now let me check ... Cagles Mill's Avatar
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    I remember when the Job Ads were always full of positions for "key-punch operators". I still have some of the programs I wrote in college laying around here somewhere in the form of key-punch cards.

    I also remember when the latest thing in computer games was sitting down in front of a teletype machine to play Star Trek. The teletype would print out a little grid with letters like "E" and "K" to represent where the Enterprise and Klingon ships were.

    In the early 80s I thought it was great to use a 300 baud modem (I actually don't think it was that fast) to hook up to Bulletin Boards with my TRS-80 Color computer.

    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Anybody remember back in the day when AOL *only* gave you 80 free hours to test-drive them? <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Thanks to AOL I never had to buy floppy disks. I would just erase all the disks I would get from them and put blank labels on them. I was disappointed when AOL changed to using CDs.
    Rick M.
    I would rather have a bottle in front of me, than have a frontal lobotomy!
    Does your bubblegum lose its flavor on the bedpost overnight?

  8. #8
    ABW Ambassador
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    "AltaVista.com sold for $3.3 Million."

    Figure inflation in, and Google should go for about 3.5

  9. #9
    CPA Network Rep JP Sauve's Avatar
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    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Chief_Beef:
    "AltaVista.com sold for $3.3 Million."

    Figure inflation in, and Google should go for about 3.5 <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    That wasn't the sale of the search engine though. Just the domain name. Previously the Alta Vista search engine (which was #2 behind Yahoo for awhile) was found at http://altavista.digital.com.
    [font=verdana][b][size=3][color=red]Are you familiar with [URL]MaxBounty.com[/URL] yet?[/color][/b][/size][/font][font=verdana][b][size=1][color=black]
    • Over 120 merchants with CPA/CPS programs seeking affiliates
    • Over 4500 network publishers seeking programs to advertise
    • Earn $100 per merchant and 5% per affiliate on the second tier [/b][/color][/size][/font]

  10. #10
    Internet Cowboy
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    Remember Internic? The real one was Internic.net and domains were $150. Internic.com was a poser and sold domains for $350.

    I remember my first PC. It was a 286/12 with a MASSIVE 40 mb hard drive. I was happy to find this machine at Sam's Club for a low price of $1750.00

    Windows 3.0 was replaced by the much more efficient 3.1 version. The only problem was that all of your apps had to be run in DOS because there were hardly any written for Windows.


  11. #11
    http and a telephoto
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    I still have a couple of Commodore 64's and a 128 laying around somewhere... and remember when modems went from 1200 to 2400 and hoped that the carrier wouldn't drop before the downloads finished for a change.

    Had some extremely high Compuserve bills back then... When my children were diagnosed with Spinal Muscular Atrophy I went on Knowledge Base (I forget the name of the daytime full priced service, they got some bucks from me too!) and found out so much information that at the next doctor's visit the doctors wanted copies and wanted to know where the heck I found this stuff.

    Remember text interfaces for surfing? Gopher and telnet were our only options for "seeing" websites. FTP was king.... Lynx was da bomb...

    ((sigh)) it was all so simple then, only geeks could surf {{giggle}}

    (edited because the board software didn't like a couple of characters I typed)
    Deborah Carney
    TeamLoxly.com BookGoodies.com ABCsPlus.com

  12. #12
    Moderator MichaelColey's Avatar
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    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by mobilebadboy:
    14.4 modems? I still have my 1200 & 2400 baud modems. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>14.4 modems? I still remember 300 baud modems. And CNet BBS's. The big BBS's had TWO 166 KB floppy drives!
    Michael Coley
    Amazing-Bargains.com
     Affiliate Tips | Merchant Best Practices | Affiliate Friendly? | Couponing | CPA Networks? | ABW Tips | Activating Affiliates
    "Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world." Nelson Mandela

  13. #13
    Not Verif-Lidated infoTim's Avatar
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    My first real program was written in FORTRAN on punched cards.

    I remember how it was a real step up when we got to use a 110 baud typing terminal. You could tell how long someone had been working by the size of the pile of paper coming out of their terminal. :-)

    I remember when we were all mortified that somebody let this on-line service called AOL connect to "our" Internet.

    I remember when connecting my company to the internet for doing e-mail involved a 2400 baud modems and something called UUCP.

    I remember having a 3 MEGAbyte hard drive that was bigger than my desktop computer is now. And I was happy with it. :-)

    I remember seeing this program called Mosaic that looked at documents in this wierd HTML format and wondering why anyone would want to do that since Gopher and trn were so much more useful. (oops!)

    I feel old. :-)
    Tim
    consultant by day, affiliate by night

  14. #14
    notary sojac Herb ΤΏΤ¬'s Avatar
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    I'm slowly (will take years) clearing out my cellar, taking the odd electronics to ham radio flea markets. Today I tripped over a wood-boxed portable 300 baud drop-the-telephone-handset-in-the-holes modem.

    kinda moldy; garbage day is coming . . .

  15. #15
    Member kmkimmo's Avatar
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    I remember the excitement of hearing my 1200 baud modem connect to a BBS for the first time. It took me hours to get that thing to connect.

    And learning the modem commands, typing in ATDT and hearing a dial tone. : OOOO, the thrill.

    I remember HATING AOL when it first came out because it REQUIRED me to use a mouse! Of course, I never really changed my mind about AOL.

    I have a question regarding old computers. What do you do with them? I have at least 4 old PCs in the garage that really are not worth anything...do you just throw them away? Is there someone somewhere that could get *some* use out of them as I'd be happy to give them away.

    Come to think of it, I have about 5 old TV sets with the same dilemma...they weigh about 100 lbs each so I am not too interested in taking them anywhere..but I'd be happy to let someone pick them up!

    I moved into a new house last summer and have been trying to figure out what I should do with them...any suggestions?
    - I am not young enough to know everything

  16. #16
    MasterMike HardwareGeek's Avatar
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    I use to make money with all advantage

  17. #17
    Not Verif-Lidated infoTim's Avatar
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    Some old electronics are bad for landfills because they leak certain chemicals/metals.

    Check to see if your town has a special recycling or displosal process for stuff like that...some do!
    Tim
    consultant by day, affiliate by night

  18. #18
    Resident Genius and Staunch Capitalist Leader's Avatar
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    My first modem was 300 baud. It was already going obsolete--most people had 1200

    First computer: TRS-80 w CASSETTE TAPE drive & 300 baud modem. Ecch...
    There is no knowledge that is not power. ~Hemingway

  19. #19
    ABW Adviser Panel Dynamoo's Avatar
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    Acoustic couplers.. remember them? They were.. well, dreadful.

    Back in the days before the web, the most fun thing was Usenet News, it's faded a little bit now though. Eventually there was Gopher.. anyone remember that?

    How about sending emails with bang paths? Where you had to know the route the mail would take, and all the hops. ukc!axion!tharr!conrad is a bang path I used to quote.. it was up to the sender to figure out how to get their mail to ukc in the first place (one reference I can find is cri.dk!dkuug!sunic!sics.se!fuug!mcsun!
    ukc!axion!tharr!conrad). It didn't always used to be so simple as someone@somewhere.whatever.
    Innovative advertising with Slimeware Corporation and Telephore. Mail-order fuel with Petrol Direct.

  20. #20
    You are in, or you are out ... choose!
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    Hmmm, I remember punch-cards & teletype. We used email before it was email. My first real forey was with music computers with 8bit sound where having 32K or RAM per channel was not only cutting-edge but also very expensive. And the syste, & sounds were on 8" floppies. Then we moved to 16 bit sound and got a 60Mb hard disk to test. We were in heaven and it only cost half a years wage.

    Sigh.

    Woz

  21. #21
    ABW Adviser Panel Dynamoo's Avatar
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    Anybody remember these.. the ADM3A made by Lear Siegler in the late 70s? They were *old* when I was using them, but kit was always scarce so you used what you could get your hands on.

    It was one of the first ever "designer" bits of computer equipments - made by the same people who built LearJets. Some people think it looks a bit like the original iMac.
    Innovative advertising with Slimeware Corporation and Telephore. Mail-order fuel with Petrol Direct.

  22. #22
    Not Verif-Lidated infoTim's Avatar
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    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Dynamoo:
    Anybody remember these.. the http://www.tentacle.franken.de/adm3a/ made by Lear Siegler in the late 70s? <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    My goodness...yes, I believe I used one of those a few times. I seem to recall a computer room at a college where we had a few Tektronix terminals, a dozen of something else (DEC?) and one or two of those Lear Siegler's being the terminals of last resort because they were quite aged and cranky by that time.

    Just like I am now. :-)
    Tim
    consultant by day, affiliate by night

  23. #23
    Not Verif-Lidated infoTim's Avatar
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    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Dynamoo:
    How about sending emails with bang paths? Where you had to know the route the mail would take, and all the hops. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Yeah, I set up a few uucp connections for various companies like that. I remember there was a Usenet group dedicated to just publishing map entries of each of the computers and what other computers they had wired or dialup connections with and what the dialing schedules were. They could build a map of it all and you knew that if you needed to get mail to a certain computer you'd know what the intermediate bang path was.

    And then after the "@" and DNS came along there was a period of comingling with the "%" letting you specify an Internet relay to use for a "!" host like smith%smithco%ucbvax@berkeley.edu. Or something like that. I'd have to go back and read the RFC's.
    Tim
    consultant by day, affiliate by night

  24. #24
    Outsourced Program Manager tmartini's Avatar
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    My first "notebook" computer:

    The Osborne 1

    64k RAM, dual 5 1/4" drives and a 300 baud modem (to dial into Compuserve) + WordStar & MS Basic. All this and it only weighed 24 pounds! It kicked A$$!

    -- Todd
    Todd Martini
    Digital Marketing Manager
    Jones Soda Co.
    Follow Me on Twitter

  25. #25
    ABW Veteran Mr. Sal's Avatar
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    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>
    Released in 1981 by the Osborne Computer Corporation, the Osborne 1 is considered to be the first true portable computer - it closes-up for protection, and has a carrying handle. It even has an optional battery pack, so it doesn't have to plugged into the 110VAC outlet for power.

    While quite revolutionary, the Osborne does have its limitations. For example, the screen is only 5" (diagonal) in size, and can't display more than 52 characters per line of text. To compensate, you can actually scroll the screen display back and forth with the cursor keys to show lines of text up to 128 characters wide. http://oldcomputers.net/osborne.html
    <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Thanks for The memories.

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