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  1. #1
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    I am looking to start an affiliate program that has a nice pay out of around $50 for any merchant account that is opened.

    I am looking for a good fit for this? We are looking at different networks. I have already spoken to some like affiliate fuel.

    I keep hearing about Shareasale.com through this web site.

    My question is that for B2b which ones are good?

    Thanks,
    Ammad

  2. #2
    Affiliate Miester my2cents's Avatar
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    the problem you are going to have... is ABW is geared toward B2C as is shareasale... so no matter what you do as far as picking a network and promoting it here is going to be a tough go...


    you need to frequent the many B2B forums to promote you program...

    Joe
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    that's my2cents, 'cuz I'm a legend in my own mind....

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by my2cents
    the problem you are going to have... is ABW is geared toward B2C as is shareasale... so no matter what you do as far as picking a network and promoting it here is going to be a tough go...
    I know this is alittle old, but I was wondering if this is still true today?

    I posted something similar to this, about B2B Aff Marketing in Midnight Cafe, but didnt get alot of response, cept someone (sorry, I forgot who you were) said that you can sell everything through Aff Marketing.

    I know I mostly see B2C programs in ABW.

  4. #4
    Member infoscott's Avatar
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    B2B aff marketing on the larger scale seems pretty pointless to me. If you're a medium to large company, you know who your suppliers are, and you're going to negotiate a better price based on a volume purchase agreement or some other tiered pricing scheme. You're not going to go poking around the net looking for a site that sells you production goods. For non-production goods, it's really just a specialized case of B2C. You can't set a cookie on an open purchase order. The one exception that comes to mind is maybe ad specialties; the logo and business name tchotchkes.

    For small business it's a whole different story. I'm aff marketing to hobbyists, prosumers, and professionals in the beaded jewelry industry. Other than Ebay, beads themselves aren't really eligible, but business cards, books, furniture, storage containers, and other goodies are all eligible. What I like about small B2B is you know your customer is ready to spend, in fact they have to spend for materials and supplies. You're just making their purchasing job that much easier at no direct cost to them.
    [LEFT]Scott :tartanber [URL=http://www.scotthamilton.net]My Vanity Page[/URL][/LEFT]

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by infoscott
    B2B aff marketing on the larger scale seems pretty pointless to me. If you're a medium to large company, you know who your suppliers are, and you're going to negotiate a better price based on a volume purchase agreement or some other tiered pricing scheme. You're not going to go poking around the net looking for a site that sells you production goods.
    I should have been more specific with my question. I am in the process of developing an online software system for small to medium business. However, because of the nature of it, itís not really a hard product but more of a soft product or service. It will target somewhat general to very specific niche business - more along the lines of service-orientated business/professions.

    For obvious reasons, I am asking this because I donít want to invest any time or money if it wonít work with AM.

  6. #6
    Member infoscott's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kend
    I should have been more specific with my question. I am in the process of developing an online software system for small to medium business. However, because of the nature of it, it’s not really a hard product but more of a soft product or service. It will target somewhat general to very specific niche business - more along the lines of service-orientated business/professions.

    For obvious reasons, I am asking this because I don’t want to invest any time or money if it won’t work with AM.
    From my B2B experience, I think it's doable, but to do it well will probably take programming.

    In 1993 a little startup called Requisite Technology tried to dominate the B2B electronic catalog business. They were specializing in non-production goods procurement; printer paper, staples, that sort of thing. In some ways they were like a Boise Cascade ecatalog business. I met the CEO in 1996 or 1997, brilliant guy and it seemed he would have carved out a big chunk of the market for himself. Because of their manufacturer relationships they would have qualified as one of the largest networks in their time, probably bigger than CJ.

    The problem was getting paid. Their tool was expensive to build and maintain, and I don't think he was getting compensated enough either by the procurement customer or by the manufacturers, especially when the manufacturers were racing to create their own electronic catalogs. Eventually Requisite partnered up with SAP and become on of their larger third party solutions providers.

    There are plenty of manufacturer B2B electronic catalogs out there, some of them are even standards compliant, but they're all competing against each other. I see an opening in the space that Requisite left, namely a affiliate marketing compensated electronic catalog, using big guys like Staples or Office Max for fulfillment, and probably shaved down and customized to particular industry purchasing habits.

    For example, you might have an ecatalog for independant tax preparers and accountants. It would offer calculator tapes and ribbons, printers and consumables, laser printer paper, staples, mailers, postage, copy services (Kinkos), everything they could want. On the content side it could include key links to the irs.gov site, and maybe a blog on recent tax rulings from the tax court.

    So if that is the sort of thing you have in mind, I think it's very doable. I believe for various reasons B2B marketing will always be more profitable than B2C, if for no other reason than business see spending as a necessary part of being in business. They're a little less shy about it.

    [LEFT]Scott :tartanber [URL=http://www.scotthamilton.net]My Vanity Page[/URL][/LEFT]

  7. #7
    Member KrisKringle's Avatar
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    I agree!
    Quote Originally Posted by infoscott


    I believe for various reasons B2B marketing will always be more profitable than B2C, if for no other reason than business see spending as a necessary part of being in business. They're a little less shy about it.

    I totally agree, but do you think a blended approch (to retail AND Bulk-buying consumers) would interest some affiliates? For example, our niche DVD's selling are well as retail singles and in bulk wholesale lots (10+1, 30+3, 100+10 @ 50% or more off) to niche fundraising groups. (Great ROI for them, too.)

    If the retail sale paid affiliates 40% + 10% second tier (50:50 after we cover SAS and 2CO), would bulk sales to more motivated affinity groups attract any affiliate interest at 30% + 10% second tier (still 50:50 net at wholesale)? Any ideas would help!

    Can you even offer two rates 30% and 40% at Shareasale? or second tier?
    Perhaps 30% on both retail and bulk, but a 10% bonuses on cummulative retail sales of 10, 30, or 100. Can you offer bonuses at SAS?
    What cookie duration is best for residual sales? One Year? Would being able to offer free goods or donation of extra DVD's to a bulk-buyer's cause help affiliates attract interest and promote sales? Sorry to run on.....

    Thanks again

  8. #8
    Member infoscott's Avatar
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    If the bulk SKUs are packaged in retail wrap, you let them sell into the same market. You'll find some small business would rather stock up then make trips throughout the year. OEM/white box SKUs might get tricky if you want to limit how it shows up in the channel and to whom it should go. You may just want to sell those into disc duplication house accounts and not put them out to aff marketing. Think "major accounts".

    I'm no aff marketing tier pricing guru, but from what I've seen in other compensation schemes, you can provide a commission bump based on volume and let the affiliate marketers themselves sort out what works best. For example, a marketer might feature bulk packs of DVDs just after tax season to remind those accountants to image their electronic returns.
    [LEFT]Scott :tartanber [URL=http://www.scotthamilton.net]My Vanity Page[/URL][/LEFT]

  9. #9
    Member KrisKringle's Avatar
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    Thanks infoscott.....great advice!

    Trade dress is the same, so I will try a commission bump based on volume.
    Buy one-Get one on orders of 10+ would equal wholesale and give the bulk buyer room to profit. (Buy 10 - Ship 20) I would love to develop "Major Accounts", as the disc costs drop alot on large orders. One set is aimed at drug companies and recruiters who spend heavily on educational gifts to health care pros.

    Thanks again!

  10. #10
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    Thank you very much Infoscott. My product is not a electronic catalog business but somewhat related. With all the B-to-C talk, I was getting a little worried.

    Im not ready to go live with it (I also want to abide by the forum rules), but I will get an ad and announcement when Im ready.

    Thanks again

  11. #11
    Full Member asr_guy's Avatar
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    Hey Kend can you give an update? There's potential for b2b aff. marketing in the form of "partner programs". In the s/w world it's a new paradigm for distributors, resellers, and VAR's.

    I think we see more of b2c aff. marketing due to the economies of scale.

    Cheers,
    Peter
    [URL=http://www.typoassassin.com/?utm_source=abestweb&utm_medium=forum&utm_content=p&utm_campaign=sig]Are these affiliates stealing from you?[/URL]

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