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  1. #1
    Super Dawg Member Phil Kaufman aka AffiliateHound's Avatar
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    Angry Is the End of Net Neutrality the End of Affiliate Marketing?
    Will affiliate marketers be able to compete against the online behemoths who will be buying access to consumers?

    F.C.C., in ‘Net Neutrality’ Turnaround, Plans to Allow Fast Lane

    Many doomsday stories have come and gone (and some are still in progress) but this may well be the the final stake in the heart of this industry.
    Since June 10, 2012 a vegan aarf but still writing the Hound Dawg Sports Blog
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  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by AffiliateHound View Post
    Will affiliate marketers be able to compete against the online behemoths who will be buying access to consumers?

    F.C.C., in ‘Net Neutrality’ Turnaround, Plans to Allow Fast Lane

    Many doomsday stories have come and gone (and some are still in progress) but this may well be the the final stake in the heart of this industry.
    As someone who has gone thru many, this and that is going to kill the industry posts, nah. Maybe, it's obvious and I'm just missing it, but what is the connection to affiliate marketing that you think will kill it?

  3. #3
    The "other" left wing davidh's Avatar
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    My only thought on this is what about the consumer? These cable companies have quite a racket; the consumer pays for access to the content, and the content providers pay for access to the consumer? They should just give the consumer the premium service that they are paying a premium price for.

    Geez. I remember one of the premises of cable TV in the early days would be that there would not be any commercials, because the consumer is footing the production and broadcast bills instead of the advertisers. But now there are more TV commercial slots than ever before, and we are paying to watch them.
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  4. #4
    Super Dawg Member Phil Kaufman aka AffiliateHound's Avatar
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    ISPs will have the right to decide which sites will load at current or accelerated speeds, and which sites will be relegated to slow speeds. The primary factor ISPs will be using in making such determinations will be the fees that mega-companies will be willing to pay to "own" the top speeds, with the small guy and the new guy left in the dust. Also, ISPs will be allowed, according to some sources, to give exclusivity deals to some companies, giving them the one and only spot in a high tier, relegating all others offering similar content to lower tiers. Startup sites? Unless they have major financing, will be picking up the far rear.

    Here is an excellent article from Slate.com that gives a lot of specifics.

    Macys, Walmart, Target, Home Depot, Best Buy, etc. might well end their affiliate programs, and maybe even ppc and/or paid placements, and put their cash into paying ISPs for those top tier advantages. All they'll need is natural search and fast loading when us other guys hang and buffer.
    Since June 10, 2012 a vegan aarf but still writing the Hound Dawg Sports Blog
    "If you don't have time to do it right, when will you have time to do it over?" -John Wooden;
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  6. #5
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    In the end, I think sites will pretty much load the way they have been. Most of the internet is comprised of "lower end" type sites if you will. I can't picture me trying to go to a site and it loading up like I was on dialup or something. It's just one of those things to me some people worry about but in the end, nothing really comes of it. Froogle was supposed end us all, and it ended up ending itself.

  7. #6
    Moderator leeann's Avatar
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    In an article written by John Hayard for Human Events, he defines Net Neutrality as "a solution in search of a problem." He asks us to imagine the internet in an environment where it was mandatory for ISPs to treat an "obscure cat blog" in the same manner that sites like Fox News and Netflix were treated. And being that this is a super conservative website, he ends the article with, "Net Neutrality is ObamaCare for the Internet." I've never considered myself as an ultra conservative, but I agree with every point Hayard makes. What I don't know is, what can I do to help stop it from happening? What can any of us do?
    leeann


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  9. #7
    Super Dawg Member Phil Kaufman aka AffiliateHound's Avatar
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    I disagree vehemently with every word in Hayward's article.

    And, look at the date of this article - April, 28, 2012. This is NOT in response to the new regulations about to be imposed. But:

    1. His opening assertion that "Net Neutrality” lies at the heart of the FCC’s ongoing efforts to regulate Internet access" is patently absurd. Net Neutrality is at the heart of the FCC's efforts until the past week to keep access to the internet equal for all consumers on one side and for all website providers on the other.

    2. His castigation of ISPs as "companies that currently labor under the delusion that they own the infrastructure they have created, and can therefore rent it out as they see fit" is anathema to the concept of the public utility. They own that net infrastructure no more than cable and satellite providers own the airwaves. The public good requires regulation to benefit consumers. ISPs understood thsi when they began just as did Time Warner Cable, A T & T and Southern California Edison.

    3. "Imagine what would happen to Internet traffic if ISPs were required to treat obscure cat blogs the same way they handle Fox News, CNN and Netflix". Fairness and equal opportunity, that's what. Just like on your cable system that gives you the same access to the Sundance Channel or Antennae TV as to fox or CBS.

    4. He has it absolutely backward when he says that Net Neutrality would result in payoffs for net access. It is the abandonment of Net Neutrality and the sale of bandwith to the highest bidder as the new rules would legitimize that will absolutely do that.

    5. His derogatory references to Obamacare (the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act) are outrageous right wing bullshit that is totally offensive and that belong on a fixed noise site (which I guess humanevents.com is of a similar ilk). Yea, nothing ever was thrust upon the American people as bad as the ACA, all that getting millions of people insurance, imposing meaningful regulations on health insurers who have been used to their million-dollar-per-day profits, cutting their profits from 35% of premium income down to a bare-bones 20% max, preventing them from canceling coverage for people who DARE to submit a claim, etc. etc.

    Strike out the lies and propaganda just as with the ACA and the real Net Neutrality can be seen as fairness for all who use the internet, not a for sale to the highest bidder system where those of us with a small web presence, ideas for new sites, and the inability to buy access in line behind Walmart and Macy's are going to be left in the dust.
    Since June 10, 2012 a vegan aarf but still writing the Hound Dawg Sports Blog
    "If you don't have time to do it right, when will you have time to do it over?" -John Wooden;
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  10. #8
    ABW Ambassador 2busy's Avatar
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    The FCC established a new inbox for comments on their Open Internet actions and accepts consumer comments via Twitter as well. The information is on the FCC site at FCC Establishes New Inbox for Open Internet Comments | FCC.gov which I'm sure keeps a department busy with sorting. Consumer comments are a consideration in rulings. Getting accurate information into consumers information stream is where it seems to break down. All current changes under proposal and consideration are there too.
    From what I read, it has more to do with regulating streaming services either at the supplier or user end. At the supplier end (like Netflix) we would all pay more, not just those using streaming services. At the user end, you use, you pay - which seems more normal. But little about internet services is offered 'normally'.


  11. #9
    Moderator leeann's Avatar
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    So..like, where is the dunce hat when you need it? I really should avoid posting my opinions on stuff I don't know about, especially late at night.

    Thanks for enlightening me. Obviously I haven't paid much attention to the new proposed rules and didn't really grasp the impact that it would eventually have on the entire internet as we know it today.

    I was looking at it in real simplistic terms. The catch phrase, "fast lanes," seemed appealing if it meant improved video streaming, etc. It seemed reasonable that if a company wanted to pay for a "faster" lane, they should be able to do it. The idea of watching better quality Netflix movies fogged my senses.

    When looking at the big picture, it seems we are looking at a Pandora's Box full of big rich corporations ready to stampede over the smaller competition. Is that worth being able to stream a clearer version of Das Boot? No way.

    What I find really confusing is the Appeals Court saying that the F.C.C. was wrong to apply the same rules to Internet service as it does to telephone companies.

    "In particular, the court said that the F.C.C.'s regulations wrongly applied the same rules to Internet service that apply to "common carriers" — that is, telephone companies, which are required to carry all calls and are subject to rate regulation."

    If internet service providers aren't "common carries" what are they?

    As far as the reference to Obamacare, let's just say I agree to disagree. My insurance has never been so thin in coverage or cost as much as it does today. But then that's another discussion...
    Last edited by leeann; April 30th, 2014 at 06:50 AM.
    leeann


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  12. #10
    ABW Ambassador JoyUnltd's Avatar
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    While consumers have the chance to comment, overwhelmingly, your average John and Jane Q. Public have no clue what net neutrality is, probably never even heard of it. There aren't specifics outlined as to what businesses/organizations not being able to pay for access to the "fast lane" will have their online presence impacted.

    Agree with trust, I can't imagine that dialup speeds would be implemented. But think that it's a good idea that "checks and balances" are specified, which don't seem to be right now.
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  13. #11
    Super Dawg Member Phil Kaufman aka AffiliateHound's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by leeann View Post
    What I find really confusing is the Appeals Court saying that the F.C.C. was wrong to apply the same rules to Internet service as it does to telephone companies.

    "In particular, the court said that the F.C.C.'s regulations wrongly applied the same rules to Internet service that apply to "common carriers" — that is, telephone companies, which are required to carry all calls and are subject to rate regulation."

    If internet service providers aren't "common carries" what are they?
    This is because federal law specifically says that the internet is not a public utility and thus there is no similar regulation as there is for "real" public utilities, including in rate structures. Thus, ISPs can and do charge what the market will bare, rather than having to apply to a state PUC and justify rate increases. Maybe people in other countries can add some information, but it is my understanding that most of the rest of the word does include it as a public utility and that ISP rates in most other countries are significantly lower than in the US.

    Quote Originally Posted by leeann View Post
    As far as the reference to Obamacare, let's just say I agree to disagree. My insurance has never been so thin in coverage or cost as much as it does today. But then that's another discussion...
    I could write and write about the benefits of the ACA for my wife and I personally and generally for millions of others, but I will just say this: After paying OUTRAGEOUS rates for decades for private coverage that could not be changed as my wife is uninsurable with many, many "pre-existing conditions", under the ACA my premium for very similar coverage was reduced 90% and we no longer have to worry about her approaching the lifetime cap on insurance benefits that she was getting dangerously close to.
    Since June 10, 2012 a vegan aarf but still writing the Hound Dawg Sports Blog
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  14. #12
    Moderator MichaelColey's Avatar
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    Personally, I think the net neutrality concerns are majorly overblown. The changes being proposed have included some pretty strict guidelines to prohibit abuse by the providers. My view is that they're not trying to restrict access or provide slow access to anything, but are making a way for places like Netflix to pay so that their customers can have faster streaming or have their data excluded from bandwidth caps.
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  15. #13
    ABW Ambassador 2busy's Avatar
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    The problem I see with allowing Netflix to pay for better speeds is that Netflix is unlikely to pay from their own pockets (profits) what they can spread across all their users. So you would be paying more for rentals by mail and online streaming whether you're a power user or not - although I have read that they intend to "grandfather" existing accounts if that were to happen.

    Maybe people in other countries can add some information, but it is my understanding that most of the rest of the word does include it as a public utility and that ISP rates in most other countries are significantly lower than in the US.
    I have heard from some Europeans in this regard, that they say they do have widespread, high speed, reasonably priced internet widely available, but many would prefer the US system because the utility designation brings unwanted government involvement in content and censorship in some countries. A person I know in South America is blocked from accessing their own websites which are hosted in the US. The blocking is on his end via the ISP and is politically motivated from all appearances. There are good and bad points on both sides and maybe some "grass is always greener" too.

    There are still communities all across the US without adequate internet services. The two types of communications are interdependent but regulated quite differently. If you live in a large city you have many choices and rates are more reasonable because there is competition. When you get further away from cities and heavily populated suburban areas there are far fewer choices and fast speed, reasonably priced options just do not exist. This has nothing to do with Net Neutrality but it keeps millions of people from knowing or caring much about the Neutrality issue.

  16. #14
    OPM and Moderator Chuck Hamrick's Avatar
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    This has been making the rounds but work watching for some comic relief: "Brilliant! #netneutrality "


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  18. #15
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    The fact that John Oliver single-handedly crashed the comments section of the FCC website on Sunday night (just minutes after the above segment aired) gives me hope..

    His segment was lauded as the most clear and thorough explanation of what has been a rather confusing subject.

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