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  1. #1
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    Is it okay to be both an Affiliate publisher and merchant on the same site?
    Hello everyone!

    As I am working on promoting our dog training membership program and building content on the blog, I got to thinking. (dangerous)

    I am doing blog review posts of some of our favorite enrichment products for dogs. I discovered I can link my product images via becoming an affiliate through Amazon and earn commissions for those sales. Just not sure if that is appropriate or a smart business move considering our site is primarily marketing our video subscription product. And I do plan on launching an affiliate program as a merchant when the timing is right, as you all have guided me on the right timing.

    If it is appropriate, any downsides or upsides you can think of?

    smiles and wags ~

    Jody

  2. #2
    Affiliate Network Rep JCrooks - AffiliateWindow's Avatar
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    Keep in mind that it would be very frustrating for any affiliates joining your future program if they sent traffic to your site, only to have that traffic be non-commisisonable because you instead sent the consumer to Google. Not a good idea to be both a merchant and an affiliate on the same site.
    Jeannine Crooks - Always happy to share what I know! - Voted Best Network Rep 2013 & 2014
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  4. #3
    Super Dawg Member Phil Kaufman aka AffiliateHound's Avatar
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    Your idea is an absolute no-no and would cause you to immediately lose your affiliates. An affiliate promotes a merchant program with the purpose of receiving reasonable compensation for the sending of traffic to the merchant site, i.e. commissions for sales generated. When the merchant site then sends that traffic elsewhere, and even worse, in a manner that generates income for the merchant while excising the affiliate from the income stream, that is a total breach of the affiliate-merchant relationship.
    Since June 10, 2012 a vegan aarf but still writing the Hound Dawg Sports Blog
    "If you don't have time to do it right, when will you have time to do it over?" -John Wooden;
    "Raj, thereís no place for truth on the internet." -Howard Wolowitz[/SIZE]

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  6. #4
    Affiliate Manager AffiliateWarrior's Avatar
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    As a merchant with an affiliate program, your revenue generating activity on your site should be closing the sale or lead... nothing else. Anything else is not fair to affiliates who are driving traffic with the expectation that you are trying to close the sale or lead and reward them for traffic that they sent.
    Wade Tonkin - Affiliate Manager - Fanatics
    NFLShop.com|Shop.NHL.com|NBAStore.com|Store.NASCAR.com
    Email wtonkin // at // Fanatics.com

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  8. #5
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    Wow, I was not really expecting that as the answer, especially after researching it more. As a business owner, you always want to diversify your streams of revenue.

    On my blog, for instance, I publish content that does not directly compete with my product, but will add value to my target market. If I do a product review of work-to-eat puzzle toys on my blog, it would be unethical of me to link that product photo to the product on Amazon?

    I am confused because I owned a dog daycare/boarding/training/grooming facility. We also sold products in our lobby. Our local vets also sold some of the same products, but it did not stop them from referring customers to us. Sorry, just trying to wrap my head around this so it's clear to me. I appreciate your helping me to understand.

    Maybe it's because I am looking to attract affiliates such as vets, rescues and dog daycares. They are going to want to be an affiliate because they want their customers/adopters to get the best dog behavior and training info. I'm not sure they would look at it in the same way as publisher type of websites. Thinking out loud a bit.

  9. #6
    Affiliate Network Rep JCrooks - AffiliateWindow's Avatar
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    Those affiliates aren't going to be the ones who do anything for you, so if that's what you want, fine. If you want to have a serious affiliate program, then only be a merchant and focus on optimizing conversion of the products you sell rather than trying to sell someone else's, perhaps using traffic generated by a legitimate affiliate who then doesn't get compensated for sending it.
    Jeannine Crooks - Always happy to share what I know! - Voted Best Network Rep 2013 & 2014
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    US Programs | Canada Programs | UK Programs | Ireland Programs | Mainland Europe Programs

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  11. #7
    Super Dawg Member Phil Kaufman aka AffiliateHound's Avatar
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    Think of it this way - you arrange with your vet who sends you customers that for every dog grooming referral he sends that pays for your service, you pay him $10.00. You have a similar deal with another groomer, for any overflow or other customers you send that person, her/she pays you $10.00 for each such paying referral. Then, when the vet sends you referrals, you send them to this other groomer, collect the $10.00 and tell the vet the customer went elsewhere.

    That is exactly what you would be doing.
    Since June 10, 2012 a vegan aarf but still writing the Hound Dawg Sports Blog
    "If you don't have time to do it right, when will you have time to do it over?" -John Wooden;
    "Raj, thereís no place for truth on the internet." -Howard Wolowitz[/SIZE]

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  13. #8
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    What sort of publisher sites would pick us up as an affiliate? This is just so different then the business model I had planned. Most people choose dog training through referral by someone trusted. Friend, family, vet, breeder, rescue, shelter, daycare or pet supply store. What sort of publishers would be comparable in trust ranking? You really believe we would generate more sales of our program that way?

    I'm not finite in my decision on which path to go. I want my program to reach and help as many people and dogs as it can. Trying to figure out what that looks like with an online program. Very different from what I have done thus far.

  14. #9
    Super Dawg Member Phil Kaufman aka AffiliateHound's Avatar
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    From your opening post: "I am working on promoting our dog training membership program and building content on the blog". I would assume affiliates with pet-related sites would consider promoting on-line dog training programs. It's up to you to provide information to prospective clients (available for your affiliates to use) that can convince them of the honesty, reliability, and success of your methods. Hint - I would think that a free trial of the first lesson would be a great marketing tool.
    Since June 10, 2012 a vegan aarf but still writing the Hound Dawg Sports Blog
    "If you don't have time to do it right, when will you have time to do it over?" -John Wooden;
    "Raj, thereís no place for truth on the internet." -Howard Wolowitz[/SIZE]

  15. #10
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    The hint is highly appreciated Phil! I have been learning a lot in Neil Patel's University videos. Have you heard of him? I am assuming he is considered a merchant. So he doesn't have any of the links monetized that he refers me to throughout his program?

    I think I am getting what you all are saying too. Going from brick and mortar to online comes with a massive learning curve.

  16. #11
    Beachy Bill's Avatar
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    QuickSprout, eh?

    The product costs a single-time fee of $97 for full access to all current and all future content. This cost is advertised as a discount from the full price of $467, but this isnít accurate, and the $97 price is always available.
    That, and it being a Clickbank product, tells me all I need to know about that program.

    Sorry.
    Bill / Marketing Blog @ 12PM - Current project: Resurrecting my "baby" at South Baltimore..
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