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  1. #1
    ABW Ambassador
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    I have noticed their banner spinning here at ABW today. They promise 10,000 for just $30.oo.

    I wonder how fast they can deliver those hits?

    Anyone...???

  2. #2
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    I am curious about it also!
    Cazzie [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif[/img]

  3. #3
    Domain Addict / Formerly known as elbowcreek Thomas A. Rice's Avatar
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    I just signed up for them an hour or so ago.... I'll let you know if I make any sales.

  4. #4
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    elbowcreek, please advise if they have any type of targeting mechanism.

    also how many visitors you bought and how long it took to get them all.

    thanks [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif[/img]

    [ 05-29-2002: Message edited by: breeze ]

  5. #5
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    I also dropped $30 into this program with Mucent. I'm a little concerned that I haven't heard back from them since they took my money yesterday.

    Okay, maybe they are real busy. I'll wait and let you know how I make out.

    -Pat

  6. #6
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    This program claims to offer guaranteed hits, but as far as I can see all it's guarantees is page impressions.

    There's little value in the traffic if your window just gets closed down by an annoyed surfer.

    Unless there's some sort of targetting I'd say it's a complete waste of money [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_frown.gif[/img]

  7. #7
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    Best I can tell is that they are running a script that simply hits the submitted URL repeatedly.

    It is pretty funny to watch my page counters increase by double-digits on every refresh.

    It's not so funny that it appears that I have wasted the 30 bucks.

    Does anyone feel that the traffic from mucent is from real unique surfers? What have you found? If we all agree that the site is a fraud (IF), then we should see that the ads are taken off of ABW.

    Thanks.

  8. #8
    Full Member c4's Avatar
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    Nextime better check what you're buying:

    EXAMPLE

    You probably do get 10.000 uniqe visitors, BUT not only they do not offer any kind of targeting, your site automatically opens like a pop-under which makes it rather annoying than anyting else ...

  9. #9
    ABW Ambassador
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    Here are my stats on my first 2 days:

    2,500+ page views.

    5 clicks.

    2 newsletter sign-ups from the 5 clicks.

    hmphhhh...<IMG src=http://www.abestweb.com/ubb/icons/icon8.gif>

    I think that the pop-under is normally never, ever seen by the surfer.

    What is happening is on every search mucent is forcing new pop-under ads through that back window without the surfer ever knowing. All they keep hearing is extra clicks in the background.

    SCAM

  10. #10
    Domain Addict / Formerly known as elbowcreek Thomas A. Rice's Avatar
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    mine has not begun yet. Although it's sounding kinda bad here, I'll hold off til I see if I make any sales.

  11. #11
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    Mine started last Friday. For the first day I was getting triple-digit hits (just hits) every hour. Then, since Saturday, there hasn't been much activity at all from those folks.

    They must have turned off their mouse clicking machine! [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif[/img]

    I guess this is just another lesson learned. Gee, I hate learning so much!

    -Pat

  12. #12
    2005 Linkshare Golden Link Award Winner  ecomcity's Avatar
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    They'd best come forward and explain their practices or Haiko should take them off the banner rotation.

    By Stefanie Olsen
    Staff Writer, CNET News.com
    June 3, 2002, 12:45 PM PT


    Pop-under advertisements, the oft-annoying windows that spring up after a requested Web page, might pack a financial punch to the publishers supporting them if one dot-com has its way.
    ExitExchange, an ad-technology provider that is claiming rights to the invention dating back to 2000, had its patent application published by the U.S. Patent Office last week. The filing broadly covers any systematic delivery of a window launched after another, including those on devices such as cell phones. If its application is approved, ExitExchange will have rights to collect royalties on the use of pop-under ads.

    That would be a direct hit to the pocketbooks of Web publishers such as NYTimes.com and ad networks such as DoubleClick, which have adopted the imposing ad format, among many other types, to better lure marketers during a tough economy. Yahoo, for example, started running pop-under ads last year amid concerns about its weakening online advertising revenue.



    Pop-unders have become a kind of calling card for companies such as X10, a seller of tiny surveillance cameras, and travel site Orbitz because they can blanket the Internet with promotions at a cheaper price than direct mail. The ads are also thought to get higher response from consumers than standard display ads on Web sites.

    Some ad industry executives are quick to point out that claiming rights to the invention may be a tall order, given the history of experimentation in online advertising. But patent experts say the ephemeral nature of the Internet could make it a cinch to pass the Patent Office's approval process.

    Greg Aharonian, who publishes the Internet Patent News Service and works with law firms to vet patent claims, said that anyone who wants to debunk ExitExchange's application would have to find a technology or reference to the practice before 2000, or what's called prior art. This might be tricky, he said, because the descriptions for inventions or practices often change.

    A Web site operator of an adult site, for example, may have used pop-under advertising prior to 2000, but the technology may not have been documented. Someone would have to find reference to such a practice in an article or journal to undermine the patent claim.

    Such a daunting task is the primary reason many patent applications go unchallenged and are easily approved by the Patent Office, which only has a couple hours to review each application before making a decision, Aharonian said. Critics say this has caused a great number of patents to be passed that are based on simple, commonsense ideas that merely capitalize on the system. A child, with the help of his patent attorney father, recently seized on a patent for swinging sideways on a playground swing, for example.

    "A lot of these ideas are indeed stupid, and if you have some manner of time you can find something to kill it," Aharonian said. "In fields like software, there is an abundance of prior art. But if the examiners don't have the time then they'll have to issue it."

    A "more polite" ad
    Andrew Vilcauskas, founder and CEO of ExitExchange, said he thought of the idea while owning and operating an Oregon-based Internet service provider in the late '90s. He said he saw several complaints from ISP customers about pop-up advertising, or ads that launch over a Web page. This gave him the idea to create a "more polite" form of advertising, which would be triggered once the Web surfer was done viewing a page. He said testing for this form of marketing began in 1998 and his company ExitExchange launched the ads in 2000.

    ExitExchange has a network of about 40,000 publishers that display pop-under ads, Vilcauskas said.

    "The importance of this is that pop-unders have become the flagship offering of the major portals," he said. "Our ultimate hope is that we would bring our licensees to all agree to a standard for behavior for these ads that would be palatable for the surfers out there."

    FastClick, another pop-under technology provider founded in April 2000, started running the ads in October of the same year. The company has an ad network of about 4,000 publishers running the promotions.

    Dave Gross, CEO of FastClick, said the company is looking into the patent claim but would not comment further.

    New York Times Digital said it could not comment on the patent application. It did say that it had not heard of ExitExchange and was not aware of the application. DoubleClick and Yahoo could not be immediately reached for comment.

    According to its patent application, ExitExchange is claiming rights on pop-under advertising since May 2000. Specifically, the invention "is directed to a post-session advertising system that may be used in media such as computers, personal digital assistants, telephones, televisions, radios and similar devices," according to the filing.

    "A viewer initiates a load-triggering event and in response, a post-session platform is opened to display a post-session display in the background of the media," the filing reads.

    Preparing to make them pay
    Karen Oster, patent attorney for ExitExchange, said the company is confident that no one can claim prior art on the invention.

    "All these people that are infringing--if the patent is approved the way it was published, then they would be liable for a reasonable royalty from the date at which they had actual notice of the published patent application," Oster said.

    The back payments would be required by a relatively new law, the American Inventor's Protection Act, which was enacted in November 1999 and came into effect the following year. It allows for the publication of inventors' patent applications, a common practice in foreign countries, and it grants rights to the approved patent going back to the time its application was published.

    This means that if the patent is approved, which could take anywhere from a year to several years, companies regularly delivering pop-unders, including DoubleClick and NYTimes.com, would need to pay royalties on the ads from the time the patent was published, Feb. 14, 2002.

  13. #13
    ABW Founder Haiko de Poel, Jr.'s Avatar
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    Mike,

    That ad is shown via another webmaster BE ... but, I will remove it.

    Haiko

  14. #14
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    Update:

    No further contact from them and the traffic has come to a halt.

    I have not yet even gotten even 25% of the hits they promised.

    And just try getting a refund after paying with PayPal, what a joke.

  15. #15
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    Same here. Nothing after the initial 900 or so hits (low quality hits that is)! I think that we have been taken! [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_frown.gif[/img]

    I'm suprised to see that their ad is still running here on ABW. :confused:

    Let us know if the traffic magically starts up again - I'll do same.

    -Pat

  16. #16
    ABW Founder Haiko de Poel, Jr.'s Avatar
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    Pat,

    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>I'm suprised to see that their ad is still running here on ABW.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Is it in the Link Exchange rotation (bottom)?


    Haiko

  17. #17
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    Yes, the red banner on the bottom. I guess you can't stop that one if it is from LinkExchange.

    By the way, it is spawning no less than a half-dozen pop-ups.....!

    -Pat :eek:

  18. #18
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    I haven't had any problems with pop-ups. The only pop-up I've come across is an occasional one on the ABW front page (nothing in the forums). I thought this was something Haiko put up when the talk of lawsuits by scumware started....

  19. #19
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    I'm not sure what you are referring to. I was just talking about pop-ups when clicking on the big red mucent ad at the bottom. They seem to have changed their page from this morning, and eliminated the pop-ups too.

    -Pat

  20. #20
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    update:

    hits promised 10,000

    received in may : 5-28 / 5-31 = 2,150
    so far in june : 863

    at least the counter is moving, I think...

    it may take the rest of the year to get the other 7,000! :eek:

  21. #21
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    7/9/02 - update

    Hits received so far in July =

    Zero, zilch, nada, none, the big goose egg, didly squat!

    Mucent is a SCAM SCAM SCAM<IMG src=http://www.abestweb.com/ubb/icons/icon29.gif>

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