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  1. #1
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  2. #2
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    Hooray! hooray!!!!

    Maybe some other large Corps. will follow in their footsteps.

    Gene
    TCS

  3. #3
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    Interesting read. Thank you for sharing. Particularly liked the part about how spammers are so easy to track down:

    "The spammers could be tracked down, in many cases, using information contained in the e-mail itself, Smith said. "Every spam e-mail has many things that are false, but they usually have one thing that is true," Smith said. They will contain an e-mail address or some other way to contact the senders. "We can also follow the money. It's often sent to sell a product and service; spammers are going to legitimate businesses and offering to send millions of spam messages on behalf of that business. We can go back to the business and find out who they entered into the contract with."

    Since most companies do not invest in filing lawsuits against spammers I think the most effective way to stop spammers is to stop paying them. When Advertisers are contacted and told the publisher is a spammer they will usually deny payment to the spammer and cut them off.

    Ben Kiblinger
    GoToMyPC
    benk@expertcity.com
    https://www.gotomypc.com/partners.tmpl

  4. #4
    2005 Linkshare Golden Link Award Winner  ecomcity's Avatar
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    Senate Committee Approves Anti-Spam Measures
    Thu June 19, 2003 12:12 PM ET
    By Andy Sullivan
    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A U.S. Senate committee passed a toughened measure to crack down on "spam" e-mail on Thursday and promised that it would be strengthened further by the time it comes up for a full vote.

    The Senate Commerce Committee also voted to give antifraud enforcers greater authority to fight the unsolicited commercial pitches that now account for up to half of all e-mail traffic.

    Both measures passed by voice vote with little debate, reflecting the consensus on Capitol Hill that new laws are needed to stop the electronic deluge of pornography, get-rich-quick schemes and quack miracle cures that frustrates Internet users and costs service providers billions of dollars in wasted bandwidth.

    "Something has got to be done to protect American consumers and businesses from spam, and this is a good start," said Sen. John McCain, the Arizona Republican who chairs the committee.

    click here for more on this great news...
    http://www.reuters.com/newsArticle.j...toryID=2956782

    Mike & Charlie ...

    If they won't adopt and feed a bird ..flip them one! BBQ some Gator and remember to flush WhenU..

  5. #5
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    Thanks for the timely article. I shared it with the rest of our marketing group here. Sounds like the proposed federal law could clean up a lot of "opt-in" lists and practices. Would be nice to see fewer companies out there with names like "opt-in real huge" and "opt-in bonanza".

    Ben Kiblinger
    GoToMyPC
    benk@expertcity.com
    https://www.gotomypc.com/partners.tmpl

  6. #6
    2005 Linkshare Golden Link Award Winner  ecomcity's Avatar
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    Microsoft Forms Group to Fight Flood of Spam
    Mon June 23, 2003 08:02 PM ET
    By Reed Stevenson
    SEATTLE (Reuters) - Microsoft Corp. MSFT.O is assembling a team of experts charged with battling the accelerating spread of spam as unsolicited e-mail clogs in-boxes worldwide, including that of Bill Gates, founder and chairman of the world's largest software maker.

    At risk is the usefulness of e-mail itself, which has allowed people to communicate more quickly and efficiently, said Kevin Doerr, who has been named to direct Microsoft's spam-fighting strategy.

    "Where it hurts most is customer satisfaction. But when it starts to change behavior, we could have consumers turn away from email, and that has huge implications," Microsoft's Doerr told Reuters on Monday.

    Microsoft now blocks more than 2.4 billion spam messages daily. North American e-mail users are expected, on average, to see the number of spam e-mails that they receive daily more than triple over the next three years to 35 messages per day, according to Ferris Research.

    A team of about 20 people from across Microsoft is now working to come up with ways to fight spam. That team will grow by about another third in coming months, Doerr said.

    Redmond, Washington-based Microsoft, along with other major Internet businesses, has ramped up its spam-fighting efforts in recent months in response to an sharp increase in spam that has sparked a jump in consumer complaints.

    Microsoft said last week that it had filed 15 lawsuits against individuals and businesses that it said are responsible for flooding its Internet service arm with more than 2 billion spam messages daily.

    In April, Microsoft, AOL Time Warner's AOL.N America Online unit and Yahoo! Inc. YHOO.O -- which represent the world's largest block of e-mail users -- said they were working together to block unidentified messages and to stop spammers from creating fraudulent e-mail accounts.

    "One of the things that we're very clear about is that there is no one single solution to this problem," said Doerr, who outlined Microsoft's strategy of using legislation, technology and industry collaboration to fight spam.

    SPAMMING CHAIRMAN BILL

    Microsoft Chairman Bill Gates wrote an open letter on Monday explaining his dislike for spam, weighing in with an endorsement of legislation that would require unsolicited e-mail senders to identify their messages with "ADV:" in the subject line.

    His letter also called for establishing clear guidelines for legitimate commercial e-mail. Microsoft has long argued that overly restrictive regulation could hurt companies that want to communicate with their customers via e-mail.

    "Congress could help by providing a strong incentive for businesses to adopt best e-mail practices. Our proposal is to create a regulatory 'safe harbor' status for senders who comply with e-mail guidelines confirmed by an FTC (Federal Trade Commission)-approved self-regulatory body," said Gates.

    Gates also revealed that he, too, receives "a ton of spam every day."

    "Much of it offers to help me to get out of debt or get rich quick," wrote Gates, the world's richest man.

    "It would be funny if it weren't so irritating," Gates wrote in an opinion piece entitled "Why I Hate Spam" that was published in the Wall Street Journal.

    http://www.reuters.com/newsArticle.j...toryID=2975885

    Now that Bill Gates is pissed at spammers maybe he's like to entertain adding a spyware/adwarez removal tool to eliminate popup spamm infesting his Operating system via BHO's.

    Mike & Charlie ...

    If they won't adopt and feed a bird ..flip them one! BBQ some Gator and remember to flush WhenU..

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