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  1. #1
    ABW Ambassador
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    If there are any people who have come to live in the USA from a different country, I would like to ask them a question.

    What is normally involved when you try to build your credit? Do banks normally give credit to people who come from a different country, who have no credit file?

    Does anyone know of some good credit card offers that can help build a credit line? Please no affiliate bulshit either. Do not post anything that is geared towards affiliate earnings.

    I would appreciate any advice on this matter. I am from England, married to an American woman. I am now legal I now have my permanent residency

    www.cjshoppingnetwork.com

  2. #2
    "An Englishman In New York" TJ's Avatar
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    It just takes time... I have better credit than my wife now. Start small... get a credit card that will accept you, get a car payment from your bank... that kind of thing, it will only take about 2 or 3 years

    We found NO credit history was worse than BAD credit history! Now I have 0% credit card offers in the mail every day!

  3. #3
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    Thanks TJ. I don't care how long it takes. We are looking into getting a new car, so a car loan is a start for my credit file. I am just wondering which credit cards are likely to accept someone with no credit.

    www.cjshoppingnetwork.com

  4. #4
    Resident Genius and Staunch Capitalist Leader's Avatar
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    I'm not an immigrant, but I know Capital One will take darn near anybody for their basic card... PUNY credit line to start, and they'd rather give you a new $300 CC than raise the old one (in order to eat another annual fee). But tolerate them for a while and the more decent offers should start to appear once you've got some kind of credit history built up.

    It is a beautiful thing, to do nothing, and then rest afterwards.~Spanish Proverb

  5. #5
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    You may want to try AT&T Universal Card (MasterCard). I got one when I had next to no credit history in college, and I still have it to this day. Great card, great rates, and great customer service. And, best of all, NO ANNUAL FEE.

    http://www.universalcard.com

    Also, I would get the car loan first, and then the credit card. You don't want a bunch of credit checks on your record when you apply for a car loan.

    Michael

  6. #6
    "An Englishman In New York" TJ's Avatar
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    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Thanks TJ. I don't care how long it takes. We are looking into getting a new car, so a car loan is a start for my credit file. I am just wondering which credit cards are likely to accept someone with no credit.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>You just reminded me... if you cant get the car loan on your own, make sure you are the primary borrower and your wife is the co-borrower.

    I got a card with Providian with a $1000 credit limit in the beginning, they had a $59 anual fee at the time, but I figured it was worth it Now I have a gold card with them <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

  7. #7
    Mama in Charge Anne's Avatar
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    Not from another country but we all have to start somewhere. When I was 20 ( last year, LOL) I took out a loan for $500.00. I put the $500 in the bank and paid it off over three months. I paid the $500 plus some interest. I was advised by a bank officer to do this three more times over the course of a year. Thus I had $2000 in loans over a year, that were all paid off on time. After that, I was home free. I always got approved for everything with that, paired with a steady work history. Now there are more options to establish credit but this is an easy way to start. I actually put the mone they loaned me in an account in their bank, so it never left the bank, ha ha!

  8. #8
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    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Anne:
    Not from another country but we all have to start somewhere. When I was 20 ( last year, LOL) I took out a loan for $500.00. I put the $500 in the bank and paid it off over three months. I paid the $500 plus some interest. I was advised by a bank officer to do this three more times over the course of a year. Thus I had $2000 in loans over a year, that were all paid off on time. After that, I was home free. I always got approved for everything with that, paired with a steady work history. Now there are more options to establish credit but this is an easy way to start. I actually put the mone they loaned me in an account in their bank, so it never left the bank, ha ha!<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    I know someone who did something similar back in England. He took out small loans for years, always paying them off on time. He had perfect credit. He then went on to apply for a massive loan. He got the loan and then left the country, never to return.

    I have thought about taking out small loans that I don't really need, just to build my credit line (I don't intend to leave the country without paying though)

    www.cjshoppingnetwork.com

  9. #9
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    If you took out a loan for $500 and then paid it back plus the interest after a week or so, and did the same thing a few times, would this increase my credit line?
    Or does it have to be spread out over a year or more to be really effective?

    www.cjshoppingnetwork.com

  10. #10
    "An Englishman In New York" TJ's Avatar
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    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>I know someone who did something similar back in England. He took out small loans for years, always paying them off on time. He had perfect credit. He then went on to apply for a massive loan. He got the loan and then left the country, never to return<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>Did he marry an American? (Kidding)

    Just for future reference, my second credit card was Discover

  11. #11
    "An Englishman In New York" TJ's Avatar
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    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by cjshoppingnetwork:
    If you took out a loan for $500 and then paid it back plus the interest after a week or so, and did the same thing a few times, would this increase my credit line?
    Or does it have to be spread out over a year or more to be really effective?<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>I think the longer the better, making regular payments gives the people issuing credit more confidence in you!

  12. #12
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    Apply for AMEX green card. Annual fee is worth the credit history you build up. Pay every penney you owe in time. Also try to be a member of a credit union and take car loan from them. Credit Unions are easier if you do not have any credit history. They figure it is better than having a bad one. Try the store credit cards like JC Penney, Sears etc.

  13. #13
    "An Englishman In New York" TJ's Avatar
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    My car loans were with credit unions... but I got refused by Sears

  14. #14
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    This goes back to my younger days, but at least here in Canada, paying for utilities such as phone, electric etc etc usually was a good start that some places could use. Maybe an idea if you have all the bills in your wifes name to change them. Just make certain you pay them on time to build proper ratings.

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  15. #15
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    I had no credit history at all. I applied and applied for credit cards ( I later found out that applying for too many credit cards actually hurts your credit), and was rejected by all of them.

    So what I did was that I took the money I was earning from CJ and saving up to by a new computer, and I took out a secure credit card from my bank. I bought the computer with my new credit card and slowly started building my credit. After I paid all the balance on my secure credit card, the bank gave me a regular credit card. Now I'm inundated with credit card offers, which I toss into the trash can

    I think that worked out pretty well for me. Think about it, it may work well for you too.

  16. #16
    Full Member DianeHeather's Avatar
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    Hello,

    I moved here from the UK about 19 years ago. When I first came over I had the most terrible time trying to get a CC. Thankfully my bank gave me a card and then everyone else followed suit.

    So start off small making sure you pay your balance each month, and you should have no problem.

    Where in the UK are you from? I am from NE Scotland, Aberdeen to be exact. It's so good to meet you, and look forward to interacting with you and the others.
    Diane

  17. #17
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    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by DianeHeather:
    Where in the UK are you from? I am from NE Scotland, Aberdeen to be exact. It's so good to meet you, and look forward to interacting with you and the others.
    Diane<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    I am from Stoke-on-Trent somewhere in the middle of England, in between Manchester and Birmingham.
    Moving from Aberdeen to California must have been a bit of a culture shock

    www.cjshoppingnetwork.com

  18. #18
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    The best credit card in the world to get is SEARS.

    Why you may ask; because they report your credit history every month.

    Buy about $25.00 - $100 a month worth of goods. Within 6 months you will have the same results you obtained as Anne stated.

    That’s how I started years ago and how most accountants tell young people to start their credit history.

  19. #19
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    When I came to the UK a few years back. I called the cc company and told them I was moving and what should I do about my cards.

    They gave me new cards for the UK and transfered my credit limit.

    ----------------------------
    If at first you don't succeed, Click, Click, Click, Click, Click, Click, Click.

  20. #20
    "An Englishman In New York" TJ's Avatar
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    Yeah, I thought something like that would work for me... I had a MBNA credit card, and was told by them that I would be able to transfer it.... they lied

    BTW, my TSB Trustcard was the only card that I could make payments to with a US check!

  21. #21
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    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Tj©:
    I had a MBNA credit card, and was told by them that I would be able to transfer it.... they lied <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    That's MBNA for you. In my experience, not the best credit card company.

    Here's what I have in my wallet right now:

    AT&T Universal Card (MasterCard)
    Amazon.com Visa (First USA Bank)
    American Express Blue

    I love the AT&T and Amex cards, but use the Amazon.com Visa the most. Why? Rewards. I really don't like First USA Bank (Bank One), but I get Amazon.com gift certificates and there aren't any finance charges until this November.

    Michael

  22. #22
    "An Englishman In New York" TJ's Avatar
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    Yeah my wife hates First USA...

    AT&T er... I have a problem with them hehehehe I screwed up that account and have a 29% interest now! LOL

  23. #23
    pph Expert! Gordon's Avatar
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    When I first came to Canada I could not get a credit card I had to use my UK one. This obviuosly cost me more as I had to pay the banks conversion percentage

    I got my t-shirt
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  24. #24
    Full Member DianeHeather's Avatar
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    I have just now seen this message, I wonder why I wasn't notified. Hmm... No worries.

    Yes, when I first came over here it was a culture shock. I went to work for USC on Catalina Island where there was only 100 inhabitants year round. It was strange because we lived right next to the people we worked with so there was no escape.

    I did enjoy my time over there but one can develop what we called "Island Fever" meaning, getting off the island at least once a month became essential in remaining sane.

    Living in Southern California had always been my dream since I was a little girl, and here I am and it was everything I expected it to be.

    I wish you the very best of luck in getting your credit card. Have you tried to get an Amazon credit card, if not perhaps you should try. I have a link at my site if you are interested. I hope your day is progressing wonderfully Julian. *smile*

    Diane

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