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  1. #1
    Moderator BurgerBoy's Avatar
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    Talking Static HTML or PHP MYSQL?
    With all of the search results bouncing around all over Google - How about some comments on which type sites are managing to keep getting the best results in G.

    It is Static HTML sites or is it PHP MYSQL sites.

    Any comments please? What do you think?

    Which way would you use to build a new site if you were building a new site?

  2. #2
    ABW Ambassador AddHandler's Avatar
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    I run both types of sites - I really do not see any difference in the SE's reaction to either one. It all depends on what's on them and how they are set up. IMHO

    They are ALL "indexed extensions" - I do not think Google or any other SE's cares what the extension is - only whats on the page and the regular stuff linking - interlinking - keywords - content....

    BUT
    I would also like to know if anyone else here see's any difference..??

    I AM NOT A SEO.. Pro..
    so take what ever I say with a grain of salt and preferrably a little lime..

  3. #3
    ABW Ambassador Ron Bechdolt's Avatar
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    I agree with AddHandler. I get more sales per day from my HTML pages, but they are my oldest sites.
    Ron Bechdolt | Affiliate Program Management Consultant
    7 Days A Week Marketing

  4. #4
    ABW Ambassador Sam Bay's Avatar
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    Problem with the static pages is that search engines can determine how often you update them. They like fresh pages so they go for the "freshest" pages in their SERPs, in my experience.

    With dynamic pages, however, robots cannot determine when they were updated so they always looks fresh to crawlers.

  5. #5
    Full Member Tech Evangelist's Avatar
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    Search engines don't care what the page extension is. They only see the HTML that's delivered. Some search engines slow the search if they detect an extension that indicates a dynamic page.

    Excessive amounts of name-value parameters will hinder search engines. It's generally safe to use up to three parameters, but any more will likely create indexing problems.

    From Google Webmaster Guidelines page: "If you decide to use dynamic pages (i.e., the URL contains a '?' character), be aware that not every search engine spider crawls dynamic pages as well as static pages. It helps to keep the parameters short and the number of them small."
    http://www.google.com/webmasters/guidelines.html

    I run several sites with both static and dynamic pages and they all index well if the site is designed properly.

    Also from the same Google page: "Make sure your web server supports the If-Modified-Since HTTP header. This feature allows your web server to tell Google whether your content has changed since we last crawled your site."

    Google uses this header info to determine the last time a page was saved.
    There's good, fast and cheap. Pick any two.
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  6. #6
    Resident Genius and Staunch Capitalist Leader's Avatar
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    But with a dynamic page, what's actually on it can be fresh even if the last time anything was actually saved was years ago. The page's header info doesn't tell how old/new whatever's in the database is...
    There is no knowledge that is not power. ~Hemingway

  7. #7
    Newbie RefreshingMedia's Avatar
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    Talking Best of Both
    Why not use the best of both?

    Dynamic pages obviously have the advantage over static for their ability to stay current through various methods.

    My suggestion would be to learn the benefits of the apache module mod_rewrite which can rewrite dynamic urls to static ones of your choice.

    example: /affiliate/clubhouse/index.php?affid=69&productid=911
    would become:
    /golfbag/yamaha/69/911.html or something SE friendly.

    I also agree with Tech Evangelist "if the site is designed properly."

    If you are new to creating sites and pages. Learn xHTML transitional and css. not old bloated table based html with font tags. The markup is clean and tags are used properly. H1's act and are weighed like Heading 1 tags. xHTML allows you to make pages that are read easily by the search engines and formatted nicely for the user. besides, there are some great hidden options with xHTML like 'a href's' rel tag and others that the search engines love. Why do you think google bombing became so big with blogs?

    Those two and a half secrets alone could boost your ranking well above the rest and virtually no one is doing it yet.

  8. #8
    ABW Ambassador Snib's Avatar
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    Smile
    I don't think Google really cares if your page is static or dynamic. What seems to matter the most is your content and links. You need to have unique content and a freqency of relevant and recent links. If blogs and forums are linking to you, you'll do well. Hard part is getting people to comment on your site through these mediums. Link exchanges in my experience don't seem to work as well as they did in the past. You need to be part of the primary internet and become newsworthy. If you can get a blurb in an online news article or popular blog, you'll definitely see an increase. It's just a matter of getting into the limelight and stirring some interest in what you have to offer.

    - Scott
    Hatred stirs up strife, But love covers all transgressions.

  9. #9
    ABW Ambassador mailman's Avatar
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    Snib. Any suggestions of the best way to start a blog and were?

  10. #10
    ABW Ambassador Snib's Avatar
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    I suggest Serendipity. Search Google for 'download Serendipity'. It's a free PHP script that looks very nice and has an excellent following. You just need a PHP webhost account with mySQL and you'll be good to go.

    - Scott
    Hatred stirs up strife, But love covers all transgressions.

  11. #11
    Full Member Tech Evangelist's Avatar
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    Snib is right. Content and "quality" inbound links help tremendously with G. Reciprocal links and paid site-wide links (links to your site from every page on another site) are not quality links. A thousand links from one site may now count as one link with G. You are far better off having single links from a hundred sites. Sites related to your industry are the best quality links.

    The last Google updates changed the way inbound links are viewed. I know of one site that had over 300,000 links to their site all focused on two or three keyword phases. They held top 10 positions but were wiped out in G in the January update. Same story with the guy who owns SEO-Guy.com. He had a firm hold on the #1 slot for "SEO" due to hundreds of thousands of links, all of which said simply "SEO" in the hyperlink. He is also gone from G for that search phrase.

    Fior inbound links I focus on listings in free Web directories. There are thousands of them on the Web. You can find them by searching for "free directory" or "free directories". The following link contains a good starter list, along with tips for submitting to free directories. http://www.alpha-ebiz.com/directory-list.php

    By the way, site-wide links and other linking programs still appear to work well with MSN and Yahoo.

    I have not heard of Serendipity. I've been looking for a blogging program and I'll check it out.
    There's good, fast and cheap. Pick any two.
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  12. #12
    notary sojac Herb ԿԬ's Avatar
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    not necessarily related to this subject, but an observation . . .

    on one site I changed the page extensions over from .htm to .php (for a reason) and for a long while, both page types were on the server. After a while, google only admitted to knowing about the .php pages.

  13. #13
    Lite On The Do, Heavy On The Nuts Donuts's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tech Evangelist
    Also from the same Google page: "Make sure your web server supports the If-Modified-Since HTTP header. This feature allows your web server to tell Google whether your content has changed since we last crawled your site."

    This is how I understand these things to work - and I'm VERY likely wrong on some important points. Chime in with corrections PLEASE!

    1) HTTP Header Viewer
    http://www.webmaster-toolkit.com/htt...r-viewer.shtml
    http://www.rexswain.com/httpview.html
    http://www.forret.com/projects/analyze/
    http://www.vipsem.com/http-header-viewer.html

    Use any of these tools - they're all very similar. If your server saves (and serves up) the last modified date, you're fine.

    2) Explanation of what happens:
    http://www.15seconds.com/issue/970911.htm

    3) You can also check your logs for "Status/Errors" page codes served up.
    If your logs show any "304: Not Modified", you also know your server is interacting with requests and properly telling those that inquire about if-modified-since data.

  14. #14
    Lite On The Do, Heavy On The Nuts Donuts's Avatar
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    And the 15seconds.com article says if you're using asp, the web developer has to set the last-modified date. So if you're using dynamic pages, I think you should consider giving a close read to that article:
    http://www.15seconds.com/issue/970911.htm

  15. #15
    Lite On The Do, Heavy On The Nuts Donuts's Avatar
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    Here's how I explained it to a buddy who emailed me about this issue...

    Hopefully, your server sets the last-modified date.

    When a visitors goes to your site, it first checks it's own cache - if the page you're requesting is cached (stored on your PC), it wants to check to see if a newer version exists at the site before bothering to download the page again. So it (the client / visitor) sends a header request called if-modified-since (it's asking if the page on your server is newer than what it has cached).

    If the last modified date is newer than the cached page, it knows to download the page cuz it's changed. Or in the case of a crawler, it knows to read your page again cuz there's been changes made - and they love the freshness!

    If the last modified date is the not newer, your server returns a 304 status code to tell the client that serving up the cached version is fine since there's been no changes. Or in the case of a crawler, no need to re-index your page cuz there's been no changes to it - stale.

    And if your server doesn't do all this correctly - clients always have to reload your pages (eats bandwidth) cuz they can't do the checking. And search engines might assume there's been no changes - cuz hey - your server isn't smart enough to announce there's newer stuff available.

    And lastly, the above is a generalization - cache settings on the client (In IE, Tools - Internet Options - Temporary Internet Files - Settings) can change the default way that a browser does the checking for "freshness".

  16. #16
    Full Member Tech Evangelist's Avatar
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    Your buddy's explanation sounds about right. That's the way I understand it to work.

    One thing I should mention is that I re-copy all of my PHP scripts to my servers on about a weekly basis. I usually make script changes about that often, and I re-copy everything just to reset the If-Modified-Since header info. I don't know for certain if it helps, but it appears to keep Googlebot coming back.
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  17. #17
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    Google is smart enough to know if the content on the pages has changed, it doesn't make a difference if the page code itself has not changed.

  18. #18
    Full Member Tech Evangelist's Avatar
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    If you are referring to the PHP or ASP code, Google never sees it. Google can only see the header and the HTML code and content. But it uses the header to check for the last change to the script code. If it never gets past this, it might not see the content changes. I suspect Google only uses this to make their searching more efficient. I've seen lots of sites whose servers are not configured to support the If-Modified-Since in the header, but still get indexed regularly.

    When it comes down to it, everything with search engines is a black box and we can only speculate about what's inside. I've focused on Google rankings for more than 6 years and the only completely consistent issue I've found is their apparent inconsistency.
    There's good, fast and cheap. Pick any two.
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