Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 50
  1. #1
    Newbie
    Join Date
    June 17th, 2005
    Posts
    2
    How to stand out from the crowd and still use data feeds.
    When I heard all of this talk about data feeds I thought wow, this sounds awesome! But now I ask...How does one stand out from the crowd with a data feed website and rank higher in search engines than the other affiliate websites that were created from the same merchant's data feed? Sounds neat to be able to create a 4000 page website in a few minutes but what is the value of that if 100 other affiliates are creating data feed websites with the same data feed content?

  2. #2
    Resident Genius and Staunch Capitalist Leader's Avatar
    Join Date
    January 18th, 2005
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    12,817
    A way to unique-ize the content from feeds is the Holy Grail of feed-runners.
    There is no knowledge that is not power. ~Hemingway

  3. #3
    Moderator MichaelColey's Avatar
    Join Date
    January 18th, 2005
    Location
    Mansfield, TX
    Posts
    16,232
    The trick is that you have to find a unique way to use the data to add value to the customers.

    As an example, consider the merchants that sell rugs.

    The "simple" thing to do would be to create a site that mirrors all of the merchant sites or even one that combines all of their products onto a single site. This is not useful or helpful at all, and search engines will quickly filter those pages out. It doesn't do the shoppers any good. It doesn't do you any good. It doesn't do the merchants any good.

    The "useful" thing to do would be to load all of the data into a database, assign colors to each rug, extract all of the dimensions, and build a "rug finder". Let the customer enter a share, a range of dimensions, and a primary color that they're looking for. Pull up a list of all matching rugs. Let them further refine their search. A site like this would take considerably more work to build and maintain, but it would be far more useful.

    These are a multitude of other unique things you can do with datafeeds. These unique uses of datafeeds are the types of sites that will succeed and thrive.
    Michael Coley
    Amazing-Bargains.com
     Affiliate Tips | Merchant Best Practices | Affiliate Friendly? | Couponing | CPA Networks? | ABW Tips | Activating Affiliates
    "Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world." Nelson Mandela

  4. #4
    Resident Genius and Staunch Capitalist Leader's Avatar
    Join Date
    January 18th, 2005
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    12,817
    I disagree with the specifics of that assessment.

    THIS
    "It doesn't do the shoppers any good. It doesn't do you any good. It doesn't do the merchants any good."

    is ONLY true because of THIS:
    "search engines will quickly filter those pages out."

    It IS a very valuable service to get a site of that nature (a site that "just" lists all the rugs available) to the top of the engines. Just ask any merchant whose own site's product pages are buried in obscurity, and who, because of a site like that, does NOT have to lay down thousands of $$ up-front to an SEO firm just to have some hope of being seen (let alone sell anything).

    Or ask any customer who couldn't find what he wanted before and now can, because some feed SEOer managed to get the desired item into a findable location!

    Simple is good.

    The "useful" thing to do
    That's the complicated thing to do. But it's not really any more *useful* than the simple site! After all, if you didn't offer the search on your site, the customer would just do it at the merchant's.

    And if s/he did it at the merchant's, s/he'd already be there instead of trying to decide whether to go to Merchant A for Rug 1, or Merchant B for Rug 2, or deciding to go to the local store for a closer look and leaving you out of the loop altogether!

    Also there's the issue of the ones who wants 2 (or more) rugs, and finds 2 they like on your site--only to find that they're at two different merchants. That often means two shipping fees, and therefore causes immense indecision on the part of the customer (at least if they're like me--and I think most people would agree that they try hard to avoid paying more shipping! I also think most would agree they don't want to "shop twice" even if all it really takes is a couple more clicks and some extra typing.).

    In any case, taking some of the merchant site's functions to your site doesn't make it more "useful," that's just moving what the customer would have to do anyway, over one step.
    There is no knowledge that is not power. ~Hemingway

  5. #5
    ABW Ambassador Snib's Avatar
    Join Date
    January 18th, 2005
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    5,303
    I think some of the best examples for this are Shopping.com, Shopzilla.com, Pricegrabber.com and Bizrate.com. This is what you're up against and these are the sites you'll need to steal traffic from. They all update their products and inventory on a regular basis and compare prices and specifications. They allow you to search for dimensions like Michael described. Some key factors that many people ignore is maintaining this data. Sure it can take a few minutes to create these pages and put them online, but what if a product sells out, the price changes or category name changes. You need a robust system to handle all of this and it's a bit of a task to build.

    If you don't want to provide a useful service, you can go the Webmerge path and build static pages that *might* rank well in the engines for a period of time, but they won't last. This is the quick money route and it's the least stable way to go. If you want stability with datafeeds, be prepared to do a lot of programming and database work. It's a huge undertaking, but it can be done right. Start small and work with a few products in a reliable feed. Organize them well and add considerable value and you might stand the test of time.

    - Scott
    Hatred stirs up strife, But love covers all transgressions.

  6. #6
    Super Sh!t Stirrer SSanf's Avatar
    Join Date
    January 18th, 2005
    Posts
    9,944
    You can pick a certain subject and build a site around that which tells about any and all the products you can find that relate to that subject. Saves the customer from having to search hither and yon to find the products. They are assembled at one place. And, that can be a big time saver for the shopper.

    Take incense. Everyone (almost) sells it. You could have a mega incense site that features every merchant you can find who has any at all. There are tons and tons of merchants. And, the site would include, of course, everything you need to make your own, along with instructions and supplies on how to make it. You would isolate all the incense products from all the merchants in your feed and there you go. Incense alone lends itself to so many subcategories that it is mind boggling. For instance "Incense of the world" showing the different kinds from other places. Or, "Magickal usage" telling what kind to use for what purpose.

    The list of subjects you can pull off your master feed are endless.

    You can break this up into small catagories in a mega mall or make numerous mini sites which could have a better chance as stand alones. Or, do both.

    But, you need to organise your feed in a different way than others.
    Last edited by SSanf; June 18th, 2005 at 07:13 AM.
    Comments are opinion unless otherwise noted. Remember, pillage first. Then burn. Half of all people in the world have IQs under 100. You best learn to trust ol' SSanf!

  7. #7
    ABW Ambassador Snib's Avatar
    Join Date
    January 18th, 2005
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    5,303
    Some good advice there. Don't use all the data you can find and be very picky and careful with the information you use. Shoot for automation as much as you can here. Sometimes using the entire thing can be counter-productive. It's a lot easier to manage a smaller piece so you can better focus on a niche.

    If you're a dreamer, leave room to expand though. Don't want to confine yourself to a brand that can only sell a very particular type of product or service. This can be a problem if you use a domain like blue-widgets-for-your-home.com. I'd rather have a general niche to move into later as things progress. Here's some inspiration:

    http://forum.abestweb.com/showthread.php?t=59620

    It's a long way to go, but you gotta start somewhere.

    - Scott
    Hatred stirs up strife, But love covers all transgressions.

  8. #8
    Super Sh!t Stirrer SSanf's Avatar
    Join Date
    January 18th, 2005
    Posts
    9,944
    Big clue. Make a master feed of all the merchants you want to do business with and go from there. Ideas will jump off the page at you.
    Comments are opinion unless otherwise noted. Remember, pillage first. Then burn. Half of all people in the world have IQs under 100. You best learn to trust ol' SSanf!

  9. #9
    Resident Genius and Staunch Capitalist Leader's Avatar
    Join Date
    January 18th, 2005
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    12,817
    Some good advice there. Don't use all the data you can find and be very picky and careful with the information you use.
    I disagree. Mall sites still rule. Not only are they naturally more resistant to algo changes (algo/filter changes for one category? There's 49 others still running), but if some merchant does something stupid like sticking AdSense on its own pages, you can delete 'em without hesitation and there's still a site left! I see many, many more niche siters crying that they "have to have" [insert dud merchant here] to avoid having a gaping hole in the site.

    The only thing you really have to watch out for with mall sites is to make sure you don't get the mindset that you "have to have" everything! You don't need "everything" on a mall site. Physical malls do not have "everything" and you don't need it either. If a merchant gives hash, drop it like yesterday's news.

    TomCat--As for site-making in general:

    Remember that your objective is to make money, NOT to be "useful" or any of that other pretense that keeps invading these threads. A million hits an hour is worth nothing if you can't get 'em to buy (unless you're running CPM ads).

    Plus I disagree with the aforementioned definitions of usefulness anyway. To me, those darned comparison sites are exactly as useful as an extra butthole. I can make up my own mind, thank you!

    Even for products with a confusing array of possible features/configurations (like techie gadgets), a comparison site is NOT where I'd go. Comparison sites like B*zRate have lots of opinions, usually of dubious merit, but they don't really *explain* the features that are the source of the confusion. Some reviewers will hate Feature X, while others will buy the product precisely because it *has* Feature X! That's of no use at all for someone trying to decide whether Feature X would be good for their own purposes.

    In a real-world example, I was killing some time looking at printer reviews on Amazon last week. First clinker: I didn't buy a printer! Cluueee (reviews aren't conversionary)... Secondly, I noticed a lot of poor reviews and complaints of "blurriness" on the cheaper printers. But then some poster leaked it that they had been trying to print processor-quality color photographs!! And a closer read let me know that the others had been doing that, too. So, those reviews are totally useless to anyone who just wants to print out the occasional letter.

    So needless to say I don't think review sites are good examples. Unless you're aiming at people who aren't ready to buy (and still won't be after they waste your resources milling around your site)!

    Personally I prefer to aim straight for the person who has their CC balanced on their keyboard and has typed the keyword for what they have already decided to buy into their favorite SE. Then I just tell 'em WHERE to get it and what makes My Pick a good place to get it from.

    And no, I don't think it's somehow superior to have "outside" reviews. *I* said Merchant X is fine--and my opinion is at least as good/meritful as that of some yutz on BizRate!
    Last edited by Leader; June 18th, 2005 at 09:46 AM.
    There is no knowledge that is not power. ~Hemingway

  10. #10
    ABW Ambassador Snib's Avatar
    Join Date
    January 18th, 2005
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    5,303
    If the going price for a comparison site is between $500 and $600 million, I'd say a good chunk of the internet finds them useful. When I'm looking for something expensive like a digital camera or computer component, I'm going to first seek out all the reviews I can find then I'll compare prices and merchants everywhere for the lowest price. I use these resources just as many other millions of shoppers. I want to know I'm getting the absolute lowest price for the absolute best quality merchant. I won't take any one affiliate's word for it until I've seen all of these sites and all the merchant reviews. Everybody shops differently and the more people you can accomodate, the better.

    - Scott
    Hatred stirs up strife, But love covers all transgressions.

  11. #11
    Full Member dak142's Avatar
    Join Date
    January 18th, 2005
    Posts
    386
    To me, those darned comparison sites are exactly as useful as an extra butthole.
    OMG!!! I have been laughing alowd for about 5 minutes now! Now my wife is really looking at me funny and I can't stop laughing to tell her what it is about... GOOD ONE!!

    I also agree with Leader, I once read a thread here about throwing poop against the wall and it has serveed me well ever since, I am sure there are those there who are familiar with strategy. Many who disagree with it as well.

    Secondly I also argee with Leader on another point made and here is why. I recently bought a new laptop. I went ( physically to the store ) Best Buy and Circut City, tested and priced the laptops based on the features I wanted, narrowed it down too 2.

    Came home, went online ( I WAS READY TO BUY ), and typed in the exact model numbers of the laptops. First 3 sites up were 2 affiliate sites and Tiger Direct. The two affiliate sites also LED to Tiger Direct. Of course I then went yo my own site and clicked throught to TD, and made my purchase. But my pont is I went online knowing what i wanted.

    By the way TD was more the $200 less than Best Buy AND since it was online in a state other than my own, I did not have to pay the 6% PA sales tax, Saving me another $70!

    dak
    Last edited by dak142; June 18th, 2005 at 10:36 AM.

  12. #12
    Resident Genius and Staunch Capitalist Leader's Avatar
    Join Date
    January 18th, 2005
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    12,817
    @ Snib--But a comparison site does NOT accomodate as many people as possible. They specifically alienate and irritate those who have a mind of their own! Also they don't accomodate those who want to AVOID the hassle of looking for the "absolute best price." And I do think it is a hassle--to find the "best" price usually costs more in spent time, than the micro-difference in dollar amount is worth. Just general knowledge is usually enough to be able to spot when a price is WAY outta line...

    I will give that for some electronic stuff, comparison sites may be good. But, electronics/expensive goods are only one small segment of the retail landscape!

    Although personally I didn't get value out of comparison shopping for either of those items you mentioned. Haiko mentioned the digital camera in a thread, and I went with his recommendation. Sure there were lots of sites that talked about what they thought were "the best" digital cameras, and I did *waste* my time looking at some of them--but since every camera has its own set of avid fans and detractors, those sites had the value of noise. My experience with checking out sites for those is part of what soured me toward so-called comparison sites. What a waste it was--as much value as asking Apple fans what they think of PCs and vice-versa!

    As for computer components--Memory comes right through my own links. And when my CPU fan died, I got whatever BestBuy had that'd fit [forgot the name of it], since it was either that or not have the use of the computer! There aren't many other computer components I have interest in. The printer needs replacing but a cheapie will do--I hardly ever print anything and when I do print, it's never anything that needs any high capability. I picked my monitor by going to one store, and looking at the displays. Best looking one in my price range won. No store-hopping!

    I don't know how you can stand to do all that comparison shopping. I find that entire experience incredibly aggravating and loathesome, whether online or off!

    If the going price for a comparison site is between $500 and $600 million, I'd say a good chunk of the internet finds them useful.
    I'd say that it simply means a new dot-com bubble is here, and nothing more. In the last bubble, people were paying through the nose for all kinds of loser dot-coms, which then crashed.

    I also see a disturbing shift in mindset--back to the same exact "maybe there'll be a profit, someday, content-is-king" iffy-diffy pie-in-the-sky mindset that created the *last* round of F'd Companies!!
    Like the last time, I think some people will get rich at first by making these sucker-sales, but eventually it'll re-crash and someone will be left holding the bag. It won't be me holding it.

    When I'm looking for something expensive
    But most people AREN'T looking for something expensive. They want Wal-Marty stuff (proof? The size of Wal-Mart as opposed to companies that retail expensive things), and only get something expensive on occasion.

    $20 toasters and the like are bought a lot more often than $500-$1000+ cameras, and they need a whole lot less consideration.
    There is no knowledge that is not power. ~Hemingway

  13. #13
    Moderator MichaelColey's Avatar
    Join Date
    January 18th, 2005
    Location
    Mansfield, TX
    Posts
    16,232
    Quote Originally Posted by Leader
    That's the complicated thing to do. But it's not really any more *useful* than the simple site! After all, if you didn't offer the search on your site, the customer would just do it at the merchant's.
    What I'm suggesting is to provide search functionality that the merchants don't provide. This does work very, very well. You get a ton of repeat visitors, recommendations, free links, and word of mouth. I'm making far more from sites that use datafeeds in these "complicated" (IMHO useful) ways than I am from other sites.
    Michael Coley
    Amazing-Bargains.com
     Affiliate Tips | Merchant Best Practices | Affiliate Friendly? | Couponing | CPA Networks? | ABW Tips | Activating Affiliates
    "Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world." Nelson Mandela

  14. #14
    Newbie
    Join Date
    June 17th, 2005
    Posts
    2
    Wow this thread really took off while I was asleep...

    There are a lot of good points here...as a newbie to data feeds the following is a summary of what I learned from the replies thus far:

    1. Some of you are stating that it would be good to design a site that has data feeds from several merchants and offer search functionality on the site that then allows people to sift through the things that they are looking for.

    MY response to this: I am not a web developer I am an affiliate marketer...I can use a lot of different kinds of software and I a savvy user of marketing tools...but I do not know how to code anything...therefore the development aspect of creating the integration that something like this would take seems intimidating to me.

    2. Some of you feel that a comparison site is not the thing to do to make money

    My response to this: I think they can make money, but for an affiliate marketer with limited resources I think it would be an iffy investment of my time and money to build it and see how I come out against the big boys. Not to mention that I would need to pay someone to develop something like this...I can use DreamWeaver and FrontPage like a pro...but when it comes to developing custom front ends for database driven website that is more than I currently know how to do.

    3. Some of you suggest that a site have data feeds but focus on a niche market; for example, say I am interested in doing this with the niche "scented candles"...so put up a data feed site that is only scented candles?

    My response to this: This sounds like a good idea...I agree with niche focus...I think that trying to have everything under the sun makes it hard for someone to stand out. How can I find or take only certain parts of a data feed into my site based on the niche that I want to target...how would I be able to pull only scented candle products out of each data feed?

    I want to use a product like WebMerge for this project. I want to create thousands of HTML pages that will get indexed. How can I do this and still stand apart from others that use the same data feeds? Would I need to do on page optimization for every page that WebMerge creates and then do a link campaign for every page too? For 3000 pages that would be quite an undertaking...is there a better way to do this without needing to retouch every page by hand and optimize it after WebMerge creates it?

  15. #15
    ABW Ambassador Snib's Avatar
    Join Date
    January 18th, 2005
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    5,303
    This really just comes down to your goals and ambitions. You can settle for fast cash with the crap on the wall technique or you can be a little more forward thinking and plan for the future. Some of us are more comfortable with fast cash while others aren't comfortable with the turbulence. You don't have to do price comparisons, but it is considered a big league datafeed vehicle. There are numerous other ways to market datafeeds, and you may never need to implement a comparison depending on your niche.

    Michael has some great ideas for datafeed implementation and ideally you want to incorporate everything possible. A site that does comparison, product reviews, price alerts, wishlists, detailed searches, coupons, merchant reviews, guides and articles will definitely do better than a site that doesn't do these things. It's getting to the point where you need to start doing at least one or two of these things. The search engines are getting much more picky about who they'll link to and simply throwing a datafeed up in full won't add the kind of value necessary to last in the search results. Eventually buying a cheap domain with a static datafeed will only get traffic through PPC. If you're great with PPC, by all means build a static datafeed site. But if you want long lasting consistent free search engine traffic, you need to add substantial value.

    If I wasn't a programmer, I'd do a site one guide, article or review at a time. I wouldn't even mind buying the product so I can write a detailed review with usage instructions. There are some very successful websites that make their living writing detailed reviews about each new product as it comes out. This works great for electronics, outdoor products, computer parts, and even toys.

    I think we're getting to the point where it's much more valuable to build a site without datafeeds than with. The search engines don't want more datafeeds, so it's an uphill battle trying to squeeze even more into the results.

    - Scott
    Hatred stirs up strife, But love covers all transgressions.

  16. #16
    ABW Ambassador
    Join Date
    January 18th, 2005
    Location
    Nunya, Business
    Posts
    23,684
    "Plus I disagree with the aforementioned definitions of usefulness anyway. To me, those darned comparison sites are exactly as useful as an extra butthole."

    To you, but you would find the most successful sites that use feeds are comparison sites. They seem to be being bought up for 100's of millions nowadays. I never use them either, i just find the lowest price from a set of my favorite merchants but a lot of other people do. But i think we all know by now feed sites that are nothing but repackaged merchant catalogs have taken the big slide. A small percentage of affiliates actually know how to work them right.

  17. #17
    Super Sh!t Stirrer SSanf's Avatar
    Join Date
    January 18th, 2005
    Posts
    9,944
    You can settle for fast cash with the crap on the wall technique
    Hardly sounds like settling to me.

    I will opt for the fast cash today. Then, I will opt for it again tomorrow, and the day after and the day after and the day after.....
    Comments are opinion unless otherwise noted. Remember, pillage first. Then burn. Half of all people in the world have IQs under 100. You best learn to trust ol' SSanf!

  18. #18
    ABW Ambassador Snib's Avatar
    Join Date
    January 18th, 2005
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    5,303
    Smile
    My problem with the fast cash technique is I develop an attachment to my sites. I put so much heart into them that I can't simply ignore then and start another from scratch. I feel like I'm littering the internet if I build something new every week and disregard my failing sites. Searchers don't like it and search engines don't like it. It feels a little underhanded and I have no pride in creating a temporary money maker. This is what fuels my passion for content and community oriented websites. I really just want to make an impact and develop a reputation as a top notch site builder.

    - Scott
    Hatred stirs up strife, But love covers all transgressions.

  19. #19
    Resident Genius and Staunch Capitalist Leader's Avatar
    Join Date
    January 18th, 2005
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    12,817
    I really just want to make an impact and develop a reputation as a top notch site builder.
    And therein is the difference!

    We're in business to make MONEY, not an "impact!"
    There is no knowledge that is not power. ~Hemingway

  20. #20
    ABW Ambassador Snib's Avatar
    Join Date
    January 18th, 2005
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    5,303
    Everybody I admire who's made an impact has made millions, so I wouldn't say making an impact isn't without a reward

    - Scott
    Hatred stirs up strife, But love covers all transgressions.

  21. #21
    Resident Genius and Staunch Capitalist Leader's Avatar
    Join Date
    January 18th, 2005
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    12,817
    How can I find or take only certain parts of a data feed into my site based on the niche that I want to target...how would I be able to pull only scented candle products out of each data feed?
    As for niches, I've done a few so I know how to get the data apart. But, the dead-easiest way to get a niched feed is to sign up with a niche merchant! If you sign up with a merchant that only sells "scented candles," that's all that'll be in their feed (they may have some holders as well, I suppose, but holders on a candle site would make sense).

    But for the larger merchants:
    Manually, it's easiest to use a spreadsheet to sort each feed by category. Then cut/paste the stuff you want into a new spreadsheet.

    Programatically, a SELECT statement in MySQL works wonders under the right conditions. But with code, it can be a pain because all merchants seem to call the same stuff by slightly different names. What's "scented candles" to one, is "candles_with_heavy_perfume" to another. So unless you're dealing with a large number of feeds, it's often easier to go manual and let your brain do the thinking--humans can easily interpret meaning and naming variances.

    but I do not know how to code anything...therefore the development aspect of creating the integration that something like this would take seems intimidating to me.
    I'd advise getting a domain and cheapo hosting and just using that as a test site. I've got a robots.txt'd domain where testing code and learning new code is all I do with it. Nobody sees the parse errors but me, and with the robots.txt, it won't be popping up anywhere important (like Google) by surprise.

    If you don't want to invest, just wait a while--this business seems to result in people getting the "domain bug" eventually (resulting in the buying of every domain that sounds cool and is available), and once you get it, you'll have extra doms to play with. I suppose you could use a testing folder on an existing site, but personally I hate to practice on any domain that's open for business...

    I want to use a product like WebMerge for this project. I want to create thousands of HTML pages that will get indexed. How can I do this and still stand apart from others that use the same data feeds?
    Look for the thread on Ssanf's upcoming program. It seems to be the best bet I've seen in ages... I've also seen people talk about using find/replace in spreadsheets, but of course they don't get specific about that.

    I develop an attachment to my sites. I put so much heart into them that I can't simply ignore then and start another from scratch.~Snib
    I'm attached to my sites, too. They're ALL my children! As you've seen, I'll defend them in all their datafed glory.

    I've only got 2 sites where they really didn't work, and they're both niche sites. One was a dud from the start (no quick bux there!), and for the other one, the merchants in the category died off one-by-one until there were none, or at least none that I know of that are of any merit. Still, it'll be a sad day when I run my first domain sale and "adopt them out."
    There is no knowledge that is not power. ~Hemingway

  22. #22
    ABW Ambassador Snib's Avatar
    Join Date
    January 18th, 2005
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    5,303
    Leader has a good point about building a development environment. I developed and FTP'd my code for a couple years before I realized I could do it all locally. As far as productivity is concerned, it's saved me hundreds of hours. It's much better to install Apache, PHP and mySQL on your local machine and build fake domains that are tied to your localhost. I recommend Apache2 Triad for Windows users:

    http://sourceforge.net/projects/apache2triad/

    This will install everything you need instantly and you can start building PHP sites on your hard drive. http://localhost will load pages from c:\apache2\html. I modify the httpd.conf file and add named virtual hosts. That way I can build a document root for each of my sites and alias a fake www.sitedev.com domain to each of them. This has been one of the best changes I made in my development cycle.

    Recommended for everybody that uses PHP.

    - Scott
    Hatred stirs up strife, But love covers all transgressions.

  23. #23
    Moderator MichaelColey's Avatar
    Join Date
    January 18th, 2005
    Location
    Mansfield, TX
    Posts
    16,232
    Quote Originally Posted by Snib
    Everybody I admire who's made an impact has made millions, so I wouldn't say making an impact isn't without a reward
    I would strongly agree. Leader is implying that you either make an impact with a site or make money. What I've seen is that is a very strong correlation between useful sites and the sites that make the most money over the longest period of time. Look at all of the most profitable sites out there (Shopping.com and Shopzilla.com come to mind with their recent sales for a combined billion dollars!) and you'll find sites that took a lot of work to build, but that were very useful.

    For the time I'm spending on sites now, I would like to see returns for five years, ten years, and more. I don't want to have to continually build new sites every few months to get around the latest search engine filters.

    The need for affiliates to add value was one of the recurring themes I heard at the Affiliate Summit. I've long been a proponent of that, and was glad to hear many others echoing the same sentiments.
    Michael Coley
    Amazing-Bargains.com
     Affiliate Tips | Merchant Best Practices | Affiliate Friendly? | Couponing | CPA Networks? | ABW Tips | Activating Affiliates
    "Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world." Nelson Mandela

  24. #24
    Resident Genius and Staunch Capitalist Leader's Avatar
    Join Date
    January 18th, 2005
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    12,817
    But what impact do any of those shopping sites cause? If you chucked out any single one of them, nobody would mourn except its owners.

    Everybody I admire who's made an impact has made millions, so I wouldn't say making an impact isn't without a reward
    The one I admire who's made an impact and made billions has done a major part of it by making sure the competition doesn't get much of a chance: Bill Gates.

    I like the way he operates (most of the time, anyway). Don't worry about Google, just KILL 'EM by developing MSN Search! Now *that's* the ultimate way to take care of all algo questions: Be the one in control of the algo! Granted, MSN's not the biggest search engine...YET...

    As for the development environment, I knew before I started doing any coding that it was possible to do it all locally (Dreamweaver has a few clues...not enough though IMO!). But I figured it'd be less frustration to me to just use a domain I had kicking around than to do a local setup.

    But I did get MySQL running locally fairly quickly (long before I knew any PHP), so I could do data manipulation with my CJ feed without wasting hours trying to upload the thing. At the time I had shared hosting and no shell access, so the only way to get all that data to the site was to send it from here (rather than server-to-server FTP)...no thanks! One thing good came of it--that ended up making it a lot easier to do a PHP site, because I didn't have to learn a bunch of MySQL at the same time.

    As for your package, it may be good for an install from zero, but I'd hate to overwrite my current copy of MySQL or my current databases, or end up stuck with infernal PHPMyAdmin. I've already got Perl, too (thank Cusimano's allposters script, that won't run without it ).
    There is no knowledge that is not power. ~Hemingway

  25. #25
    Super Sh!t Stirrer SSanf's Avatar
    Join Date
    January 18th, 2005
    Posts
    9,944
    I develop an attachment to my sites.
    That's what hobby sites are for.
    Comments are opinion unless otherwise noted. Remember, pillage first. Then burn. Half of all people in the world have IQs under 100. You best learn to trust ol' SSanf!

+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. HELP! Affilliate Data feeds Don't Have All Data Needed?!
    By garyaggregator in forum Programming / Datafeeds / Tools
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: July 22nd, 2011, 04:40 PM
  2. Replies: 2
    Last Post: October 9th, 2010, 08:59 PM
  3. Data Feeds / Product Feeds
    By doogie18 in forum Commission Junction - CJ
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: December 29th, 2008, 06:23 PM
  4. new data feeds
    By markschok in forum ShareASale - SAS
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: September 29th, 2003, 08:05 AM
  5. Where do we stand now with CJ data feed?
    By Kcedit in forum Commission Junction - CJ
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: February 18th, 2003, 07:48 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •