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  1. #1
    Web Ho - Design B!tch ~Michelle's Avatar
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    Before affiliate marketing?
    I was just sitting here thinking about all the jobs I have had in my life and it made me curious as to what everyone has done for work in addition to affiliate marketing.

    My first job as a teen was cleaning motel rooms, which I hated. I quit that and went to work at a local restaurant starting out as a dishwasher for a few weeks, then I moved up to being in charge of the prep area and head bus person. After I tired of that I worked at a party store as a cashier/manager.

    I got married 4 months out of high school.

    I then started my own house/office cleaning business as well as a lawn care business with a neighbor. I did that for a couple of years.

    My next job was as the head bartender in a wild and crazy bar. I made mad tip money! I loved it! Then we decided to start a family, so I left there and went to work as the manager of another party store which I did for quite a few years until the business sold.

    After that I started my own web design/graphic design business, which I still do. I also do computer diagnosis and repair, as well as build new systems from scratch, I do database entry & typesetting a few days a month for a local newspaper and for my own clients as needed, and finally, affiliate marketing... of course. All from the comfort of my home and I wouldn't have it any other way. Nothing like being your own boss. After all the years I spent in management positions, basically running the last store I worked at, I knew then there was no way I could ever go back to being someone else's slave. *LOL*

    So, what jobs have you held in your lifetime?
    ~Michelle
    "All I ask is a chance to prove that money can't make me happy."
    "Work to become, not to acquire." -- Confucius

  2. #2
    ABW Ambassador
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    Putting up flyers all over Heidelberg for my dad's club. He was a club manager in the Army. Up and down stairwells, taking buses to different sections of the city. Started about 10 yrs old and did that whenever they had some flyers for me to distribute.

    One summer worked at an Army Map Depot in Germany, about 15 yrs old. Most fun i had at work. 4 of us just goofing off since we had 20 yr olds in charge of us, when they were around. We put in about 1 - 2 hrs of actual work a day.

    In HS did some bagging of the groceries, Orlando then Upstate NY.

    Then college, starting working at a grocery store, up and down and about thru the company and that lasted 13 years. Then quit and here I am

  3. #3
    Crazy Cat Lady Heidi's Avatar
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    I worked at a cemetary with my Dad as a teenager doing lawn maintenance. After high school I worked in a computer components factory. After that I worked at fotomat for a few years sitting in one of those kiosks in the middle of parking lots. Got married, had a few years of being a stay at home wife and later a mom.

    Left my husband and ended up working at arby's for 2 days before I quit, from there I worked at a supermarket in the fresh salads and other food area making the dishes and learning how to create cool garnishes with food. From there I worked for awhile in AM/PM mini-market/gas station. Eventually I became the manager of a local pizza place and also did a 6 month run at K-mart in the restaurant area.

    We moved to NJ in 1994 and after that I didn't work as I had 2 kids by then and no longer had family for cheap child care nearby but became addicted to the internet and built my first websites in July 1996. I've been the full time bread winner of the family since about 2000 doing affiliate marketing.

    The one thing I discovered while working other jobs is that I can't STAND working for other people or with other people. Most of the jobs I left because the boss pissed me off and I'd lose my temper and walk out and quit - LOL

    Damn good thing I found affiliate marketing
    Heidi
    "Happy are those who dream dreams and are willing to pay the price to make them come true"

  4. #4
    More Cheesier Than Ever Cheesehead's Avatar
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    Picked Vegetables (age 10)
    Farm Hand
    Fry Cook
    Car Wash Worker
    Dish Washer
    Paint Pad Factory Worker
    Food Service Asst Student Mngr
    Jelly Factory Assistant
    Apartment Maintenance
    Quality Control Engineer
    Plastic Wrap Factory
    Handyman
    Yard Work
    Process Engineer
    Reading Books For Blind
    Head Camp Cook
    Painting Buildings
    A bunch of other odd jobs
    Current Job (not in aff mktg full time)
    This World is Not My Home
    We're gonna go inside, we're gonna go outside, inside and outside. . . And then we're gonna go go go and we're not gonna stop til we get across that goalline! Quotes from the movie Rudy, 1993

  5. #5
    Member sendmemybill's Avatar
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    I will love to read this thread, I already love that!

    Here is my story,

    From my child life to my mid-adolescence, I was a paper boy and earned some good money that I spent on week-ends, these week-ends was so fun! From the end of my teenage life to 23 years old, I was studying and did a big mistake by spending all my father hereditary succession money.

    Then I worked 2 full years as a graphic designer until a big depression at 25 years old. I felt like a slave and that something was wrong and started a comic book project, illustration business, and now here I am, almost 1 year of affiliate marketing and I am 28 years old, so much to learn!

    I never felt better in my life than at the present, I'm accomplishing some so very extraordinary things, I can't believe it myself.

    Still learning english though...(I love WordWeb)
    "Effective people are not problem-minded; they're opportunity minded. They feed opportunities and starve problems."

  6. #6
    Internet Cowboy
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    Retail sales and sales management background here. Spent several years as a Kinney Shoe Store manager. Kinney was such an awesome company. They taught me things that I still use every day in my affiliate marketing business, and not at all just about shoes, about consumers and their instincts and habits, about merchandising in general and lots more. Kinney is gone as is the family shoe store in America nearly gone, but Kinney lives on strong in the form of Footlocker and Lady Footlocker, Champs and several other stores that are in most malls.
    In 1998 I had an idea for a web site. I had a small amount of money in the bank and no clue how to make or market a web site. I bought a copy of FrontPage, quit my job, locked myself in my apartment for a month or so and built a web site and have not looked back since.
    I am not rich or getting rich, but I am thankful every day that Al Gore invented the Internet so I could use it to make a living

    That was not a political statement, just a fun poke at Al. Please do not reply with a political retort.


  7. #7
    ABW Ambassador Snib's Avatar
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    Great topic!

    After reading all these replies, I sort of feel like I missed out on some real down to earth jobs. I've never worked retail or service, but I doubt I'm missing too much.

    I got my first job in college as a PHP programmer for the Networking department at UC Irvine. I built applications for students and professors to communicate through the internet. My first system was a course planner for students to maintain their weekly schedule online. I also did the first forum system for the school. This was when PHP first came out and I was really fascinated by it's ease of use and structure. My background was all about perl, so it was exciting to start working with something new. During the same time I took a part time job doing perl applications for a dotcom startup. That company fizzled and I went back to working for the university while I completed my undergrad.

    Just before graduating I landed a corporate PHP job as an 'Advanced Programmer'. I worked on incentive and travel websites for companies like BMW, Toshiba, Epson, KIA and Wells Fargo. It was a very cushy job and I made a great living for almost 2 years. The suit and tie, yuppie, money grubbing attitude really started to wear me down after a while, so I started affiliate marketing on the side. After about a year of part time affiliate work I finally quit this job and moved overseas.

    Now here I am in Taipei, Taiwan doing affiliate marketing from home, learning Chinese and traveling. I love it!!

    - Scott
    Hatred stirs up strife, But love covers all transgressions.

  8. #8
    Mama in Charge Anne's Avatar
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    I had a string of jobs:
    Tour Guide Luray Caverns ( va)
    Mcdonalds
    Roy Rogers
    ( those were all high school)
    Pizza hut waitress
    Residential teacher for autistic kids
    Behavioral specialist for Autistic Adults
    Residential counselor for Autistic Adults
    Residential supervisor for CSAAC ( Autistic Adults)
    finished masters in clinical psychology and did some autism research
    had kids.....
    spent too much time online after they went to bed at night....

  9. #9
    Moderator MichaelColey's Avatar
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    I had a many diverse and interesting jobs before I started doing this full time 5 1/2 years ago. My first job was delivering Penny Powers in my early teens. When I was in high school, I got a job at KFC. I worked there for about three years. Then I got my first computer job (full time) while I was still going to college full time. (I worked full time all the way through college.) It was at a remanufacturing company run by a true entrepreneur. While I was working there, I got a part time job building a commercial trucking package. My next job was building a commercial engineering package to design radiant heating systems. There, I worked with a Turkish physicist, probably the most knowledgeable person in the radiant heating field. My final series of jobs were in the office products industry, first at a software consulting company, then one of their clients, then the national headquarters for the client. The jobs certainly prepared me well for where I am today.
    Michael Coley
    Amazing-Bargains.com
     Affiliate Tips | Merchant Best Practices | Affiliate Friendly? | Couponing | CPA Networks? | ABW Tips | Activating Affiliates
    "Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world." Nelson Mandela

  10. #10
    Resident Genius and Staunch Capitalist Leader's Avatar
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    I've had too many j*bs. A couple of years ago, I made a page with a lot of them HERE. (Scroll down past a couple of paragraphs of anti-empl*yment rant, and the list starts.) What sucked and/or was eyepoppingly whacked-out about each one is detailed, too...

    But in short:

    Delivering papers as a grade-schooler (quickly foisted that off on Ma...)

    After 18 (not necessarily in chronological order). This includes some "temp" j*bs:

    Making and selling cookies in a mall place
    Dishwashing
    Food service in various places
    Plastic factory. If you have any illusion that w*rking in a plastic toy factory would be fun...DUMP IT! Worst j*b ever! Wasn't *supposed* to be temporary, but...
    Different plastic factory. One day there...(temp, shouldn't have touched it in the first place, plastics plants ARE all the same: HORRIBLE!)
    Bagging groceries.
    Cashier in grocery store.
    Inventory (various temp places)
    Packing & shipping (various places)
    Packing coupon pads. This one meant counting to about 25, over and over again, all day. And they wanted me to keep my WHOLE attention, on THAT! Talk about DULL! They offered to have me stay permanently. Uh, no thank you
    Filing
    Disassembling dud parts
    Assembly (non-auto-plant) in a different place
    Watering flowers (pfftt...total blowoff...not enough pay though!)
    "Finishing Operator." Hard to describe this uber-blowoff. Basically it entailed pulling off little tabs the machines would leave on things. 12-hour shifts though, surrounded by willfully ignorant yutzes. Finally I had to run away screaming, to save my sanity...
    Pizza Delivery
    Getting carts. NOT "bagging." JUST getting carts. All day, in the snow!

    That pretty much did it. I watered some more flowers when the weather heated up, but when that person decided to try to get me to come and do it for only 1/2 hour a day, 2 days/week (Get up and spend gas to make all of $7.00/week!!) that finished it.

    Next stop, internet!

    Check out the link I put at the beginning, it describes all these crappy jobs in hopefully funny detail... there just isn't room here to say what was weird/ridiculous/absolutely crazy about some of these. (I made that page a couple of years ago, but never got around to putting it in the leaders-site nav...)



    I sort of feel like I missed out on some real down to earth jobs. I've never worked retail or service, but I doubt I'm missing too much.
    All you're missing is an up-close knowledge of what really makes customers (as a whole) tick The rest of the experience of empl*yment has been fairly lousy, except as a motivator to not do any more of it!

    I did pick up on how to properly pack things, too. Which is NOT how most places do it. And I for-sure know what's wrong with various styles of management!
    There is no knowledge that is not power. ~Hemingway

  11. #11
    Member Jazz Times's Avatar
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    This is one of the best threads ever. It's a fabulous way to get to know each other!

    When I was 5 and my sister 4, we decided to sell our autographs to tourists. Our father's family had been in our home town (a small coastal tourist community) for 12 generations, so we stood outside the local historical commission building, named for the family and offered "authentic autographs" for 5 cents. Had almost a dollar before dad heard and put us out of business.

    Two months later we opened our vegetable stand (from produce we grew) and ran the biz until I graduated from high school (it paid for two years at UPenn).

    After college some friends and I ran away to Taipei (it was as far away from home as I could get) and opened a business helping foreign students get into U.S. colleges. Two years later (having eaten too much rice and drunk too much tea) I was a economics research associate at Harvard for 5 years. Decided that I needed to get back to the real world. Became a town planner for 12 years. Burned out - started my own research company specializing in municipal growth management. It went bust after 9/11 and I then found affiliate marketing.The best thing that ever happened to me.

    I also work at Barnes & Noble for health and disability insurance. (after some google updates I'm doubly glad to have some $$$ coming in. no matter how small.)

    (I live next door to my sister now, she runs her own ebay biz)

    Again great thread idea, Michelle.

    Jazz Times

  12. #12
    ABW Veteran Student Heyder's Avatar
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    Name anyone that doesn't love to talk about themselves.

    My first work was helping my mom around the house. When I was about twelve my father started a small manufacturing or recycling business. I worked my tail off for an allowance. His business grew and I stayed with it until I was about sixteen. At that point I started working for a supper club washing dishes and cleaning tables. I don't know how long I stuck with that. It was probably only a few months. My next was working in a cheese factory. I busted my butt for the next few years. When I was 19 I got involved in machine tool operation and learned what it was to make a small paycheck that was enough to pay most of my bills but left no room for "extra money". Over the next 3 years I started thinking higher and bigger. My family grew and jobs just don't cut it. I started many small business ideas with limited success. I stumbled into affiliate marketing about six years ago and along with continuing employment in real world sales and marketing, I manage to scrape out a decent living. My goal for this year is six digits. I believe I'm well on my way.

  13. #13
    Lite On The Do, Heavy On The Nuts Donuts's Avatar
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    Had quite a few jobs in several industries...

    Most memorable is the 5 years I spent as a nuclear reactor operator on a fast attack submarine. I've never had closer or smarter coworkers than that.

    I've also taught digital radar signal processing for adavanced fire control and attack systems to engineers and repair technicians and was certified as a Master Trainer (a hard cert to get).

    For a while I sold high speed mail opening and processing equipment... this was also fascinating to me - millions of people mail in their credit card bill every day, ever wonder where it piles up? It doesn't - depositing those checks is crucial to cash flow! There's not rooms full of low paid workers opening all that mail - there's an incredible machine, made by just one company, the exacts, sorts, reads the magnetic ink on the checks and also digitally images the checks and stubs at a rate you would NEVER believe, even if you were standing in front of it! 16,000 pieces per hour! I loved selling it, but the best part was training the customer's team to operate the beast - I'd spend two weeks with them (night and day - usually nights, got to get everything opened before the banks open to gain an extra day of interest!) and it's ungodly how much mail we could process! The biggest banks, lock box shops and credit card companies would have me in for sales and training - the machine was incredible - at the end of a shift, you could tally how much money was processed (as the digital images of checks and stubs were optically read and electronically transferred to the federal reserve check clearing system for speed). I was in a bank one day, a major bank with a huge credit card operation and we processed more than $85 million dollars in deposits in less than 6 hours. Watching the machine do it's thing was jaw dropping! And seeing the stuff people stick in their bill was a HOOT! I've seen fingernail clippings (with a note explaining why), naked pictures of the person who mailed in their payment, locks of hair, a mashed up frito (it stunk), 7 different checks in one envelope (7 guys who all paid a fraction of their cable bill), wedding invitations (yes, plural), prayer requests, shavings, a condom (unopened - person wrote a note and asked the company to wear it since they insisted on f'ing him by charging for HBO when he was "supposed" to get it for free), a tooth, biz cards, timeshare ads, an old broken hearing aid (again, with a note complaining that the company wasn't listening to her and this was intended to help the situation) and a lot more. The machine uses magnetic sensors, metal detectors, thickness rollers with profilers (for different size envelopes, or to detect folded or multiple checks and such) and more to kick out those non-auto-open pieces for manual processing - so the weird shit all got sent to one bin. Here's a picture of it:
    http://www.opex.com/eagle.htm

  14. #14
    ABW Ambassador erninator's Avatar
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    I started out at 14 mowing lawns, baling hay or whatever I could find. A year later my father hired me to draft the plans for our new house and then worked for the builder. I met some other builders and started drawing their house plans and started my first freelance business before I got my driver's license. I worked as a carpenter and did drafting and commercial art to pay for college.

    For 35 years I've been designing custom homes, restaurants, prisons, fast lube stations, horse riding stables, mini-warehouses and city parks and currently specialize in log home construction projects. I had to get other jobs to supplement my income during slow times. I was a magazine art director, photographer, civil engineering draftsman, Regional Land Use & Housing director, realtor and housing development planner.

    During the late 80's I was co-founder of American Correctional Systems, Inc. and partnered with Bechtel and Daewoo to build my modular prison designs around the world. This led into the wierd world of brokering multi-billion dollar international bank transactions as well as dealing in large scale precious metals sales. I had to walk away from it when my life was threatend (long story).

    Tired of the rat race, stress and wearing a suit and tie, it took about 5 minutes to decide to try affiliate marketing and had my 3 page site up in one weekend. It sure sucked! Been tweaking it for 5 years this month and my main site brings in more income than I need.
    ~Ernie

  15. #15
    Affiliate Manager William's Avatar
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    Talking
    Quote Originally Posted by Donuts
    Had quite a few jobs in several industries...
    Here's a picture of it:
    http://www.opex.com/eagle.htm
    I was hoping to see the bin of all the stuff collected.

    William

  16. #16
    Eternal Optimist Look4's Avatar
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    OK, first of all, there is NO WAY I can compete with Cheesehead:
    Jelly Factory Assistant
    but I'll give it a try...

    First real job (with a schedule) at 15 cleaning toilets and waxing floors at the local nursing home (The first time you run the big buffer, you learn alot about rotational dynamics)

    At 16 I got a job at KFC (Yeah Michael) and got permanent scars on my one arm from boiling oil

    At 17 I got an evening job collecting delinquent student loans from people who dropped out of beauty school and MTA truck driving school. I used a psuedonym for obvious reasons.

    When I went to college I got a job at a local toy store that also sold Apple clones, TI99's, and Commodore 64s. I was "the computer guy"

    Dropped out of college in sophmore year to work full time for Entre computer store. That lasted about a year, then they folded.

    Got my first real programming job for a firm in Lancaster PA, and was immediately put on an assignment as temporary administrator and on-site programmer for one of their clients in Washington DC. Spent a year and a half commuting and living in hotels before I saw the light and went back to college.

    Were I went to work for the toy store again. I forget what kind of crappy computer I was pushing at this point. Wasn't there a Commodore 128 for a little while?

    Finished college and moved to North Carolina with my fiance (wife 2 months later), and worked for a healthcare software company. 4 years as a support manager, 4 years as a product manager, 2 years as a QA manager. I learned more at that company than anywhere else I've ever worked. Marketing, customer relations, proper design and quality control - and most importantly how they are all interdependent. I left when the founders retired and turned it over to some outsiders who proceded to ruin the company.

    Got a dream job as director at a 3D software company - Oversaw QA and Customer support, and when we lost one of our product managers took on that role too. We made 3D games and 3D architectual tools. QA was a blast, but customer support was a headache. 3PM on Tuesday and Thursday we all stopped work and played multi-player first person shooters until everyone went home. Spent 2 years there before I...

    Followed my wife to NYC, and got a job building up a QA dept for MTV Online. An absolute circus. I took on Nick online too, and that was easier to manage, and eventually we split into 2 groups. I kept MTV and my best teamleader took Nick. Spent about 2 years there. During this time I went to night school and got my MBA too.

    Joined an Austrian marketing/web design firm that wanted to open a NY office. Flights to Vienna for board meetings once a month. We opened 8 offices in 7 countries in 3 months. We blew through almost 25 million in a year. Bankrupt and closed the doors. Yes, I'm a Dot.Com refugee too.

    Spent 6 months drawing unemployment until we moved to Berlin for my wife's transfer. I spent those 6 months building my first real web site, with my own CMS to manage it. Had a few CJ links built in, but viewed it more as a learning opportunity than a money making one.

    Moved to Berlin 4 years ago and got a job in International IT strategy. Traveled all over Europe and the head offices in NYC. Learned more about politics and cultural differences than I ever could have imagined. While not traveling I continued developing that original web site and started a few more project sites.

    First it was great when the "projects" covered the hosting fees. Then it was great when they provided some extra eating out money. Then it was great when they let me start covering my mother's house payments. Then it was great when they let me buy a used Alfa Romeo. Then it was great when they let me trade the Alpha in on a Mercedes. Then it was great when they let us take a dream vacation to Australia.

    Then I started making more than twice from my web sites than I was making from my high-stress, "day" job. I finally made a deal with my day job employer to let me be their consultant on retainer for special projects. I work about 25% for them, and spend the rest of my time on my AM and other sites. I don't work in lounge pants yet, but it's looking pretty likely I'll get there soon.
    Tom C.
    [URL=http://www.cafepress.com/simplesignshop]Simple Sign Shop[/URL]

    Every day leave someone or something better than you found it.

  17. #17
    Canadienne extraordinaire Susan's Avatar
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    The earliest job I remember is working for my Dad out of our basement. He's an electronic engineer and when he came over from Holland (with my mom on their honeymoon) he started out fixing television sets, radios and the like. Being the youngest of 5 kids, I was always eager to be my Dad's pal so he showed me how to drill press circuit boards. There I sat, at the worktable, with squinting eyeballs, delicately lowering the drill press into pre-determined spots. I must have gone through thousands of boards as part of the assembly process of building TVs and radios. Next came using a soldering iron (ouch and more ouches) to attach the various wires and thingamajigys to the boards. It's kind of cool to think that at 10 years old some of my work may still be inside these radios and TVs (okay maybe only a few after all these years!)

    From there I worked at my Dad's business keeping the books, this was way before computers landed and whiteout was my best friend. This is pretty much where I discovered my entrepreneurial spirit. I also came to admire and respect my Dad's work ethic and integrity - always be upfront and honest with your customers, do what you say you're going to do and do the job right.

    When computers came into being, my Dad, even though he was in his 50's at the time, convinced me that this was the future and I never looked back. I breathed, slept and ate technology and was usually the early adopter for every gadget and software that came onto the market.

    When the market crashed in early 2000, I almost, almost gave it up entirely to run a Spa but after two years of dealing with customers feet, nails and skin, I jumped at the opportunity to work with a number of organizations that were creating some waves in the online dating industry.

    Last year, Dad almost passed away and sitting next to his bed in ICU, I realized that I needed to make some serious changes in life. Being closer (physically and emotionally) to family was what I needed to do to enjoy life and slow down to smell the roses!

    So, I moved (kids and all) back home (to Montreal, Canada) joined the Affiliate Marketing company that managed my dating affiliate programs just this year and I'm loving it!

    Now, my Dad (who is now 75 years old and who still builds computers and software programs) has recovered nicely, I can't complain much.

    Life is good!
    Susan Arts
    Senior Vice President, Marketing
    Moxy Media

  18. #18
    Full Member BrattyKitty's Avatar
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    I've had alot of oddball jobs

    Started off as an insurance secretary for a broker while studying law.
    Quit the job and went into retail management, more money, lousy hours.
    Quit law studies (took up other courses - finished most - no degrees - quit..... )

    Went from one management job to another and then started my own business.
    Too much pressure and lack of sleep made me cranky
    I went into semi-retirement followed by a stint as a strip club manager.
    Then the computer came into my life and the rest, as they say, could be history (or not)



    Quote Originally Posted by Anne
    I had a string of jobs:

    Residential teacher for autistic kids
    Behavioral specialist for Autistic Adults
    Residential counselor for Autistic Adults
    Residential supervisor for CSAAC ( Autistic Adults)
    finished masters in clinical psychology and did some autism research
    Anne, your studies and work experience fascinates me!
    I have a son with Aspergers and you probably know all too well how much fun that is to deal with LOL!
    Never argue with an idiot.
    The person watching, may not be able to tell the difference!

    :female: :star: :envelope: [url="http://www.bridalbasics.ca/"]:weddingca[/url]

  19. #19
    Half Crazed Mommy stephfoster's Avatar
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    My first non-babysitting job was taking orders in a pizza place. Went to college and got hired by the cafeteria to make sure no one put ice cream from the soft serve machine into cups - they were only allowed to use bowls or cones. Yes, I did feel pretty silly, especially since I knew full well people took a few steps away and dumped their cones into cups.

    Next job was at a jewelry store. Spent six years there, generally one of the top 3 salespeople in the chain (9 stores). Company went bankrupt and I learned a lot about how NOT to run a business. The owner made amazingly stupid mistakes and the company was notorious in the area for a time. But, they let me do my physics homework when there weren't any customers, so I hung around.

    Then I went to work for the phone company. I was heading back to college and was hired understanding that they would work around my schedule. Had to leave after a year because the union told them they couldn't.

    Next was Home Despot..err, Depot. Started as a cashier, then into the paint department.

    Next I started working at home in medical transcription. I kept getting asked how to get started in that field, so I made a website to answer that question, which lead me to affiliate marketing.

  20. #20
    ABW Ambassador meadowmufn's Avatar
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    Snib, a fellow anteater! Zot! I too graduated from UCI, with a degree in Computer Science.

    I worked as a math/language tutor in high school. I had a short stint as a shelf-stocker/cashier at a bookstore in college. That lasted about 2 months. I hated retail. After college, I bounced around to several software/web development jobs. I'm a software tester now, but I still do web development on the side for myself and friends.

    -M

  21. #21
    Member
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    January 18th, 2005
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    I started working in high school through their work/school program doing various jobs (file clerk, receptionist). After graduation went to business school and started working with the AHA as a wordprocessor, moved up to supervising volunteers, students, coordinating social events and the yearly heart drive, also stepped in for the accountant when she was out, got to handle all that money. Boy those people were great and I learned a lot.

    Then moved to Georgia at the young age of 21 with my partner and worked in the medical records department at St. Joe's. Then got preggie at the young age of 25. Moved back to Ohio during preggie of second child. Went back to school after third child was born. Moved back to Georgia and started working as a Medical Transcriptionist. After two years brought my work home, got interested in the internet and a bonafide affiliate student was born.

    Now my kids ask when I'm gonna quit my job, of course, I tell them when they stop eating or get the hell out.

    LeDonna

  22. #22
    ABW Ambassador Snib's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by meadowmufn
    Snib, a fellow anteater! Zot! I too graduated from UCI, with a degree in Computer Science.
    Awesome!! Small world isn't it! My degree is in Computer Science as well, with a minor in Sociology. Were you around after we had eee.uci.edu? I was working on quite a few different programs there including the course planner. And did you have Klefstad or Frost? Those were a couple of my favorites. Took Frost's 3D game development class and loved it. Klefstad was quite a character and am thankful to have taken his class before he quit teaching.

    - Scott
    Hatred stirs up strife, But love covers all transgressions.

  23. #23
    Mama in Charge Anne's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrattyKitty
    Anne, your studies and work experience fascinates me!
    I have a son with Aspergers and you probably know all too well how much fun that is to deal with LOL!
    I wanted to be a clinical researcher. I have had my name published a few times in the Journal of Autism and Developmental disorders. I had started PhD work but when I had kids, my passion for working with other people's kids sort of went out the window. I am very familiar with Aspergers, though.

  24. #24
    ABW Ambassador meadowmufn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snib
    Awesome!! Small world isn't it! My degree is in Computer Science as well, with a minor in Sociology. Were you around after we had eee.uci.edu? I was working on quite a few different programs there including the course planner. And did you have Klefstad or Frost? Those were a couple of my favorites. Took Frost's 3D game development class and loved it. Klefstad was quite a character and am thankful to have taken his class before he quit teaching.

    - Scott
    Quite frankly, I don't recall if I had Klefstad, but the name sounds very familiar. I probably took him for an intro programming class. My memory's kinda shot with regards to details like names and faces (I blame years of high stress jobs. LOL). I graduated in Dec. 1997. I *think* eee.uci.edu was just starting out at the time. To give you an indication, I took my intro to programming classes in PASCAL. They didn't start offering Java/C++ in the intro classes til after I took them. I was bummed. Had to learn those languages on my own, but used them for my algorithms class. Wow, just checked the fall CSE schedule and the only name I recognize is Jacobson! Must've had some turnover in the past 8 years.

    I wish I'd taken the 3D game development class! I took 2 years of computer animation at a community college and that's the way I was headed (game development) until I took a detour somewhere... Don't know how that happened. LOL. My favorite class was HCI (Human Computer Interaction) with Ackerman. He said our final project was good enough to be sold commercially with a little work, but I was so burnt out afterwards (sick for a month solid with laryngitis on top of that) that I didn't do much in the way of programming for months after graduation.

    In some little way, I miss those days... hours of studying at the Phoenix Grille and BC's Cavern on the Green, living off Doritos and Mountain Dew in the computer lab, driving home at 1am after 16 hours straight in said computer lab. LOL. Ok, I don't miss those days ALL that much, but those were some good times.

    -M

  25. #25
    Full Member suzie250's Avatar
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    May 5th, 2005
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    Not really in order.....
    Dishwasher and then a counter cook.
    My first real job was working in the office for a machine tool builder. I was a Master at the telex machine!

    I've been a cocktail waitress, sold Tupperware, Avon and Fuller Brush. Worked behind the counter in a bowling alley.

    Shipping and receiving for a Potato Chip company.
    Shipping/receiving/production control for a wood lathe manufactuer

    Finally made it to management in shipping/receiving for a plate glass company and could not stand it.

    Quit that and sold junk at flea markets which eventually lead me to eBay.

    My favorite job was as a seminar planner for a muti-million dollar stock broker. He was the most absolute a**hole I have ever met so I had to leave.

    Easiest job I ever had was driving people home after they dropped their cars off at the service dept for repair. Got to work with my husband, and that was really nice. Most people there said they could never work at the same place with their spouse. We loved it.

    The most physical job was working at a garden center. Though I loved that job, I spent waaaay too much money there.

    The gardening lead me to making paper from plants and I sold my artwork at shows and thru an Art gallery. Worked at the art gallery as a framer. Made my first website to showcase the artwork.

    Quit the art gallery because hubby started traveling and I was always at work when he was home. A lot of alone time = computer time. I'm in the learning curve right now but our plan is for me to travel with him for a few years and eventually make enough for him to quit what he does now. (He's looking forward to being a kept man!)
    I disagree with Kay Jewelers. I would bet on any given Friday or Saturday night more kisses begin with Bud Lite than Kay.

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