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  1. #1
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    Hi
    Have been reading this forum a lot and am so glad I found it. I get great boosts of confidence (and bouts of depression) reading all of the wonderful posts. I have one site making money now (started last October with my first affiliate site) and a couple more waiting to hit the search engines. I figure that on current income, I would need 10 - 15 sites making a similar income to my first if I was to do this full time.

    OK, so my questions for anyone prepared to answer them:

    Are you full time, or does the money only supplement your day job?
    How many sites do you have/did you have when you went full time?

    Thanks

    Andy

  2. #2
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    1 site/working on 2nd or 3rd. I have a second one built but haven't decided yet whether or not to put it up yet. I basically do this full time but make a part time living LOL.

    Mike

  3. #3
    Resident Genius and Staunch Capitalist Leader's Avatar
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    THIS is it. Employment, pblhhhhh [img]tongue.gif[/img]

    To give a quickie answer to "how many sites did I have" when I ditched employment wouldn't give the whole picture...being "financially ready" was never a criteria when I decided to quit a job! It's more like, "I CAN'T STAND THIS JOB ANYMORE, BUH-BYE!!!"

    So...Technically the answer would be that I quit working when I had one site. Fortunately, that last one was the FINAL job! But, I was living at home so aside from some nagging there wasn't a Threat hanging over me... some credit card bills and car insurance but I didn't have to worry about having to move to Suite One, Cardboard Box Apartments.

    HOWEVER, I now have Seven fully launched sites--and now I am making enough to pay all the bills associated with a household. The threat of further employment has been eliminated--and I DON'T have to listen to "you should get a job" anymore !

    By "sites" I am referring to virtual malls with many kinds of products available--NOT single-product or themed sites! I figure it would take more single-product/themed sites (unless you can pick 100% ultra-winner products)...

    The performance of the sites varies--it's hard to predict how many sites it'll take to make X amount of money. Some sites may make you only a little while others will blow you away with their awesome figures when you check your stats...

    Also remember that this is a spikey business, things come up and s--t happens (read some of the Google threads)--so you'll probably want to have some money in the bank before you bolt for the gates...

    [spelling]

    [ 02-23-2002: Message edited by: Leader ]

  4. #4
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    I was a stay-at-home mom when I started, so everything I've ever earned is "extra" money.

    My hubby still considers this my "Hobby" although he is building his first site (must like the checks that come in like clock work!).

    I make much more with my sites than I would working outside the home, especially if I factor in clothing/child care/transportation and such.

    I hit $1000/mo (Sept I think) with 3 single product sites. I keep building and like Leader said, sometimes a site just adds a $100 to the monthly total, others add much much more!

  5. #5
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    Hi!

    I'm full time, since - not sure, probably around October - November. This was one site, and I'm currently breaking it up into smaller sites.

    There was no risk involved in going full time as I've always worked freelance. If I need my old job back I can switch my phone on again, and seeing as everyone will have learned to appreciate me in my absence, I could probably double my charges!

    But I won't go. I'm bored with that now.

    If I get bored with my *website*, I can ignore it. Perhaps even call it some rude names! It won't make much difference and the checks will still turn up :/

    Heh. Try that in an office.

    There are dangers to this kind of 'work'. For instance - a creeping sense of social superiority no amount of Hail Marys is gonna atone for. When other people talk about their 'tough day at work' you look at them as
    if they are from Mars etc. That kind of thing.

    When 'income' is derived from your talents at statistical analysis rather than effort - the rest of the human race all seem a little strange, they have this curious obsession with 'work' and 'graft' and the holiness inherent therein, and its relationship to 'respectability'. Once you tie income to IQ rather than effort, you are as the English say - Cookin' With Gas.

    The chief hazard of this job is it turns you into a sociologist :/


    To return to practical matters - perhaps due to the safetly net of previous customers still willing to pay for my services - I feel reasonably OK with the fact my income is 70% derived from two merchants. There are other merchants that show promise, but I'm only one person (heh - at present).

    Can I give you some advice?

    Find a merchant that converts for you (and pays up) then spend a short while pretending they are the only merchant on Earth. Every single way of describing this merchant must be found and presented to Their Public as if you will never be allowed another merchant and your kids are starving.

    I wouldn't spend more than a week at this unless you are very sure of the company, but the approach works for me. It was a gamble, but a calculated one. (Now I'm less up for gambling and more up for consolidation.)

    I've also found merchants everyone else says are crap and got them converting at EPCs ten times the rate other people do, because I bothered to go through their site and optimize for what they sell, rather than what the *say* they sell. I'll be spending more time on some of these.

    Its also a mistake to believe you need to know anything about your subject. I sell a fair amount of memory to people who don't even know how many pins their simms need! I present the info in the way I would like it presented to a know-nothing like me. Your innocence/ignorance of a subject is something the merchant themselves long since left behind, and is your chief asset.

    Every single merchant needs a little help with presentation. If they didn't, they wouldn't be paying us to sit on our fundaments all day. [1]

    Good luck!

    Oh yeah - two advantages worth mentioning. 1) you can get the check sent to whatever name and location you like, which is handy for a) mischief b) acts of charitable saintliness. 2) You are location independant and can now go live in whatever climate suits you best without a work permit or a green card.

    Heh. Future generations will probably count the day Modern Civilization came about from the date CJ was incorporated.


    I

    [1] This does not mean you need an award winning website - mostly just a visit to Overture's 'search suggestions' page.

    [ 02-23-2002: Message edited by: Icicle ]

  6. #6
    ABW Ambassador webmarm's Avatar
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    Not as much time as I'd like, life keeps getting in the way [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif[/img] . WWill have a tough time meeting my June goal of 10k$/month, but I'm not giving up.

    A small array of sites. Some malls, some themed, still playing with it. Most make money, osme more than others.

    Need a raise. Gotta make some more patges...

  7. #7
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    Full time here...

    My income is not important now but it's increasing each mounth, so I'm an optimist...

    I have 4 sites now (in Spanish, English, German and French) but my goal is have more sites in the future.

    [ 02-23-2002: Message edited by: Sve ]

    [ 02-23-2002: Message edited by: Sve ]

  8. #8
    ABW Ambassador mousejockey's Avatar
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    Full time, I wouldn't really call it fulltime, I don't know about the others
    but I do goof off a bit, especially now I've a digital camera, yeap, mouse has a new toy [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif[/img]

    I love messing around on the 'puter and tweaking sites, so you don't count the marathon 7am to 2.00am sessions when
    I get inspired. If I is wasn't doing this for money, I'd still be doing it for play [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif[/img]

    Does the money only supplement...
    No, that's it, no other source of income
    and I'm very happy with the pay.
    If I want a raise, I just put the thinking cap on and build another site....but that's only partially true, because most of the time I build a new site, because I love doing it.

    How many sites do you have/did you have when you went full time?

    I started buying and selling domains in '98 with one site, realized the potential and built 5 more sites, it's been my sole source of income since then.

    One virtual mall, one themed mall (another on the drawing board) and four niche product sites.

    I find by having various themed sites one compensates for the other during the quiet times.

    This is the most rewarding business and my only fear is one day I'll wake up and find it was all a dream and the "net" will be gone!!!!

  9. #9
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    I'm full time but I don't consider it "work" in the traditional sense.

    It is "work" more defined as an artist who loves his craft and spends his time doing what he loves.

    Believe it or not we are all commercial artists.

    One site can easily provide a full time income, and more will only add to your riches.

  10. #10
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    Full time.

    As for the second question, I consider myself full time (I am), but I never quit my other job.

    Out of college I started a web design company with a friend. As a hobby we ran a couple of non-commerical resource/news sites and eventually put up some relevant affiliate links. We made about $1000 a year promoting books and videos, but not enough to make us think much about affiliate programs as a way to generate much revenue.

    Surprisingly All Advantage was what got me into affiliate programs. When I started making $1500 a month, I was hooked.

    When All Advantage started to look like it would soon be gone, my business partner and I decided to start to creating small information based, but affiliate sales focused sites. We created one site for each potentially area that we thought me might do well with.

    We found a couple of areas that had lots of good affiliates, so we focused on creating more sites on similar topics.

    And we have never looked back.

    We still run our web design company, but mainly to service our old clients.
    Affiliate sales are were it is at. But expect volatility. Because of a number of factors, our profits are down 50% this month from November. But if your numbers are big enough, you can even face setbacks.

    By the way, Icicle had some great advice. I have printed it out to keep me focused.

  11. #11
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    I'd have to agree with everything that Leader said about the business and earning income.

    I am currently doing this part-time - however making full-time earnings from it. I have 50 sites up and running. :eek: However, I'd have to say about 30 are the true money makers.

    I like Ivandollar have not yet quit my day job. Keywords "NOT YET". I plan on doing so by October of this year - that will be my 4 year anniversary at the job. My full-time jobs salary looks like part-time income compared to what I make doing Affiliate marketing. Right now I'm using the income from my job to pay bills while I save all my Affiliate commissions for the down payment on my new house. After I move in May though - I'll have to set a date to resign. Like Leader said - employment - Plgghh!!! LOL!! I can't take it another year. LEADER - I think of you when I'm scrapping the ice off my car windows in the morning. LOL!!

    I will be able to live VERY comfortably with my Affiliate income after I resign. I might pick up a fun Part-time job somewhere just to get out the house 2-3 days a week. But NO longer will I be anyones work slave. [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif[/img]

  12. #12
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    Great post Icicle !
    Sound advice there.
    I've just really realized that I'm not making use of 80% the potential I have to earn from my current good merchants I promote.

    If I work on it I should have my goals for 2002 concretized in a few weeks.

    If only I can leave the nitty gritties in being pulled over to small biz's & administering them !

  13. #13
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    I'm doing this 'part time' as my hobby.....
    I love doing my daily job, so not sure when I will go 'full-time' doing this.....
    [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif[/img] [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif[/img] [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif[/img]

  14. #14
    ABW Ambassador Abigail's Avatar
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    I am at this full time now - I have been thinking about making the leap for about
    6 mos, teetering yes no yes no, and then I got a sign, a meant to be - I was invited to leave my employed position (new structuring, you know the drill) exactly 1 month today. I took it as fate and here I be.

    I started with content based sites and have been throwing up product pages for a few months now, I have over 100 content based pages, an opt in 4500 subscriber weekly newsletter and have now 16 product pages.

    I have been earning between $500 and $700 per month for over a year doing this part time. My goal is to boost that up x3 at least over the next few months.

    I am an ardent fan of Leader and Jada and Haiko and everybody else on this board. It's a great place to be!

    [ 02-25-2002: Message edited by: Abigail ]

  15. #15
    ABW Ambassador erninator's Avatar
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    Part time for me. As for my real j*b, I'll never leave it since I've been a self-employed architect since high school and love it. If it wasn't fun, I wouldn't do it. I started one website in '99 at the peak of the local construction boom because I knew the good times wouldn't last for ever. It was a way to offset the ups and downs of the business. The site has grown steadily to the point where I can work at either one I choose. Now that construction is slowing down around here I just spend more time on the site and watch it grow each day. Yes, there are the ups and downs, but if you stick with it long enough the road gets less bumpy.

  16. #16
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    This is a no-time job for me with a full-time blitz every now and again. I didn't touch any of my sites from december through mid feb preferring to enjoy an extended holiday, and have now started adding more sites. I presently have over 90 sites which produce a combined 5 figures a month.

    I never really quit a job to do this, but I did put other people in place to run my offline businesses rather than working there myself. I did this after my first affiliate site was introduced to Google and produced close to 4 figures in the first month. This site showed me the light.

    If you want to quit a job to do this, here's a few little notes others have put forth that keep me motivated.. Remember these are not mine, so if you wrote these originally, come and claim them..

    1. Wash, rinse, repeat.. If a site works, do it again.. Best to target a close variant of your keyword or other related keywords or phrases. - e.g. Site A = Widget, Site B = Widgets.

    2. An affiliate marketer who makes less than $2k a month is a beginner. Between $2k and $10k a month are emerging affiliates. $10k plus a month have finally got it together.. I used the fact that I was only classified as emerging to work a lot harder.

    And now some notes of my own.. don't ever put all your eggs in one basket.. If you select a merchant, be sure there are a number of backup merchants ready to substitute in their place. Draw your own opinions on what everyone on these boards has to say and create your own formula from it. Some of the advice thrown around here is top notch whilst some is complete horse radish. You need to sift out what really works and what doesn't. Also, create a two tier approach to building sites.. the first are the quick 5 hour sites which produce sensational incomes whilst they are ranked in the search engines. Build a lot of these and you'll be sleeping in piles of cash. Secondly, build solid long lasting sites suitable for branding, inclusion in Yahoo, and providing repeat visitation. If everything falls over with your mini sites, you'll always have these to fall back on.

    Regards,
    TK

  17. #17
    ABW Veteran Student Heyder's Avatar
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    Nice post TK<IMG src=http://www.abestweb.com/ubb/icons/icon14.gif>

  18. #18
    Assistant Regional Manager Rik's Avatar
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    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>And now some notes of my own.. don't ever put all your eggs in one basket.. If you select a merchant, be sure there are a number of backup merchants ready to substitute in their place.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    I hear that!

    It took me about four months to figure that one out and that was after learning the "Sell Sell Sell" philosophy from Leader and Haiko.

  19. #19
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    WOW!!!!!!! What a wake-up call. <IMG src=http://www.abestweb.com/ubb/icons/icon18.gif> I have ONE niche product site and I've been slaving over it. I've seen sales go up and learned the VERY HARD way what doesn't work. But reading this info tells me I definitely need to rethink my long-term strategy. Y'all make it sound so easy: I must be way overthinking this stuff.

    Anyone have a good book to recommend or easy-to-implement advice? The net abounds with books, all promising the ultimate solution....

    I know it can be done. Y'all are doing it, others have done it, and I must be nuts because the rewards have been so incremental respective to my efforts.

    I bow down to those of you who have successfully taken it as far as you have, and eagerly sop up whatever suggestions you offer. Thanks.
    Jujubee6

  20. #20
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    Hello All,
    I am new here. I have been lurking around reading all your great post and gaining some valuable information. I just registered my 1st domain name. I wanted to say you all have inspired me. I have always thought of creating a website. I've been an internet junkie for a long time and what better way to make money then doing what I love to do.

    Icicle writes
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>If I get bored with my *website*, I can ignore it. Perhaps even call it some rude names! It won't make much difference and the checks will still turn up :/ Heh. Try that in an office.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Great post Icicle very inspirational...

    Melanie [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif[/img]

  21. #21
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    I've been on and off full time/part time, but now full time, and permanently so. My income is nearly twice what I could hope to earn working for someone else and the sky is the limit.

    There's a lot of money to be made in this business but it takes a few years of hard work and risk and you have to expect some setbacks along the way.

  22. #22
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    Great post Icicle. I have an obsessive personality which often leads me to focus 100% on a new site just like you described. For about a month I pretend it's the only thing on earth that will bring me an income. By the end of the month if it's standing on its own then great. Otherwise, I shelf it.

    This is part time for me but with what some would consider a full-time income (about $3,500/month profit and climbing). I live on Long Island. With our high taxes, gasoline electricity, heating oil, etc... it's one of the most expensive places to live. We have a love-hate relationship with the Island. My wife and I both grew-up here so it's tough to leave despite the fact that it takes a household income of over $100k to own a house and raise a family the way that we desire.

    To describe my success I need to tell you all about failure. You see, I fail about 75% of the time. Sounds crazy, but it's true. 75% of all of the sites I build don't last more than a month before I take them down. However, the other 25% that succeed are GOLDEN.

    It's the GOLDEN opportunities that I seek. I am willing to accept failure 75% of the time because I know that it's the only way I can find success. Now here's a formula to rattle your brains;

    If 75% of the time I lose twice as much as I profit the other 25% of the time, Over a 12 month period my earnings will be DOUBLE my losses if I give each new site no more than a one month deadline to succeed.

    Here's an example of the math...

    During a year you start 100 website.
    75 fail.
    25 succeed and earn $250/month each.

    Over the course of 12 months I would profit $75,000 from the 25 sites(12 X $250 X 25).

    If the sites that fail lose twice as much as the sites that succeed, each would lose $500/month. If you only allow the failures to stay around for one month each, over the course of a 12 month period you would lose $37,500 ($500 X 75).

    $75,000 - $37,500 = $37,500 (50% difference between annual losses and annual gains)!

    This math also works if you start just 4 websites over a 12 month period. Let's use even smaller numbers.

    If the one that succeeds profits $50 a month, it will earn $600 over the 12 month period.

    3 failures x $100= $300

    $600 - 300 = $300 more profit than loss.


    As you can see, I'm proud to be a failure because the more opportunities I creat to fail, the more money I make!

  23. #23
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    TK - EXCELLENT and Solid advice - I couldn't have wrote it better myself. This business is what's up!!! I couldn't think of a better business to be in. It's enabled me to not only dream - but live the dream!! And it doesn't get any better than that. Just last June I was bearly getting a check and still struggling. Then thanks to the boards - I'm not wantin for nothing anymore!! Screw child support. I wish they could see me now.

    It takes a lot of hard work and dedication but it can be done if your determined. Listen to what people say on these boards - we have true pros in this business right here on the boards - Leader, Haiko, TK and so many more. I Love aBestWeb - Just love it.

  24. #24
    Resident Genius and Staunch Capitalist Leader's Avatar
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    TK invited people to claim their "copyrights"...

    "Wash, rinse, repeat.. If a site works, do it again.. Best to target a close variant of your keyword or other related keywords or phrases. - e.g. Site A = Widget, Site B = Widgets.~TK"

    It actually seems that you have two pieces of advice combined in that one statement: As I recall, Don C Steitz is the one who advocated targeting different variants (for the same product) with different URLs. He put more of a concentration on a single merchant than I would...

    But I have said "Repeat Until Rich". Fred calls it "wash, rinse, repeat", but I do believe he was paraphrasing the idea behind "Repeat Until Rich". That idea is to use the same basic formula that had worked before to sell more (but different) products...

    I don't know whose figures those are for the Beginner, Emerging, and Arrived affiliate...

  25. #25
    ABW Ambassador
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    TK

    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by TK:
    2. An affiliate marketer who makes less than $2k a month is a beginner. Between $2k and $10k a month are emerging affiliates. $10k plus a month have finally got it together.. I used the fact that I was only classified as emerging to work a lot harder.
    TK
    <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>


    Inspiring post. All I can think of is - I wish I was a top beginner. That would be enough for me to live confortably here, and something to build on for the future.


    Andy :eek:

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