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  1. #1
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    How can I make sure affiliates are marketing correctly?
    Hi everyone. This is my first post and if you don't mind I will get straight to the point...

    My product is just beginning to set fire on ClickBank and I am keen to capitalise on the recent interest that is materialising according to Google Analytics statistics that show an increasing number of referrals from ClickBank affiliates, which I think is great news,

    The only thing is that upon further inspection I have found that most are bidding on ineffective very broad PPC terms.

    I've been doing a lot of PPC myself to market the various products related to my book, and the e-Book itself. I've discovered that some of the most ovbious keywords are extremely competative and I never got a good return on them because the PPC rate is so high, however...

    Other narrowly-focused keywords I've discovered are extremely effective and produce an excellent ROI.

    My question is simply - how can I contact the affiliates (I have their ClickBank user ID's from the Analytics report) and let them know what they need to change?

    PS. Don't tell me I should have collected their email addresses in the first place because affiliates can come straight from ClickBank's "Promote Products" page!

    Thank you in advance, and I wish you ALL the best.
    Last edited by MichaelColey; August 26th, 2006 at 04:17 PM. Reason: merchants -> affiliates

  2. #2
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    Keep in mind that the keyword searched for & the keyword bidded on can be be two very different things.

    For example, a broad bid on the word telephone could have their ad show up for a search for ringtone.
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  3. #3
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    Is that true for Google Adwords campaigns?

    I thought if they bidded on a term like "penis enlargement" (as in this example) that would trigger "penis enlargement e-Book" but not "the VIP Muscle".

  4. #4
    Resident Genius and Staunch Capitalist Leader's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jelqing
    Is that true for Google Adwords campaigns?

    I thought if they bidded on a term like "penis enlargement" (as in this example) that would trigger "penis enlargement e-Book" but not "the VIP Muscle".
    What Enginez is probably talking about is the fact that a bidded term will appear on any search which includes that term. It's not like the engine randomly picks terms to show it on, but sometimes unexpected searches will indeed include your term.

    The example for "ringtone" is true because some people search for "telephone ringtones" or "phone ringtones" --therefore including the original bidded term "telephone" or a direct variant.

    A search for "the VIP Muscle" does not include the words "penis enlargement," or any direct variants, so that search shouldn't trigger a general ad for "penis enlargement." But, if someone searches for "VIP Muscle Penis Enlargement" it will trigger the ad. Same if someone searches for "VIP Muscle information," "VIP Muscle reviews" or the like.

    These off-base search terms can be blocked in your AdWords account. Sometimes you can predict which terms will need blocking. I always block the terms "information," "info," and "free" from triggering any of my PPC ads (I primarily use Yahoo/Overture, but Google also lets you block certain terms from triggering your ads). And for some products, there are other words I have to block.

    Hope that clears things up. If not, just keep asking on the forum and maybe someone else will be able to make it clearer...

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leader
    The example for "ringtone" is true because some people search for "telephone ringtones" or "phone ringtones" --therefore including the original bidded term "telephone" or a direct variant.
    Not exactly. For broad-match searches (no quotes or brackets), Google looks beyond the actual words in the bidded phrase. It looks for synonyms and related terms. Thus, when I bid on the phrase FAMOUS QUOTES, Google would show my ad whenever someone searched for POEMS -- I got a bunch of referrals from searches for "children's poems" on this bid. And that's just for "Google and partner search" -- my experience with "Content sites" is even further astray.

    The "problem" this creates is that when if you use {Keyword:} in an ad, you may be echoing an off-topic search phrase. When people searched for CHILDREN'S POEMS on Google, my ad with the {Keyword:} headline would repsond as CHILDREN'S POEMS and thus would induce a lot of clicks from folks who thought (reasonably) that my ad was relevant to their search. Since the destination site didn't feature children's poems, the conversion rate was nil.

    The ONLY way to track this is to check the referrer field in your log files (or use a log-analysis program that identifies referrers with parameters; most can identify and summarize search phrases).

    After my experience with this particular example, I have changed my practice on using "broad match" search phrases. Now, I usually launch each search phrase in all three modes: broad, phrase-match, and exact match. In other words, for this example, I would create a campaign that includes

    famous quotes (broad match)
    "famous quotes" (phrase match)
    [famous quotes] (exact match)

    as keywords. Then, if the results for the broad match are poor but results for the others are acceptable, then I would remove the first (broad-match) version but retain the phrase and exact match versions.

  6. #6
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    It's called the Expanded Matching Feature:

    With expanded matching, the Google AdWords system automatically runs your ads on highly relevant keywords, including synonyms, related phrases, and plurals, even if they aren't in your keyword lists. For example, if you're currently running ads on the keyword web hosting, expanded matching may identify the keyword website hosting for you. The expanded matches will change over time as the AdWords system continually monitors system-wide keyword performance and other relevance factors. This helps determine which expanded matches and variations are the most relevant to user searches. If you'd like to control which expanded matches will display your ads, consider adding negative, exact, or phrase-matched keywords to your keyword lists. Expanded matching only applies to your broad-matched keywords. This feature doesn't affect keywords you've specified as phrase matches (keywords surrounded by double quotation marks) or exact matches (keywords surrounded by [] brackets). Also, expanded-match terms aren't included in our calculations for your minimum quality threshold; therefore, they don't affect your ad's rank.

    https://adwords.google.com/support/b...36&ctx=sibling

    I have seen some pretty dubious matches come out of this, but mostly it works well.

    Basically, if you have bid on:
    perfume

    ...as a broad keyword, then your ad might show if someone searches for:
    Tommy

  7. #7
    Resident Genius and Staunch Capitalist Leader's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by markwelch
    For broad-match searches (no quotes or brackets), Google looks beyond the actual words in the bidded phrase. It looks for synonyms and related terms. Thus, when I bid on the phrase FAMOUS QUOTES, Google would show my ad whenever someone searched for POEMS -- I got a bunch of referrals from searches for "children's poems" on this bid. And that's just for "Google and partner search" -- my experience with "Content sites" is even further astray.
    I stand corrected--I didn't realize this new "feature" made such far-fetched matches!

    Fortunately I don't let that infernal engine get at much of my money. But even for the little bit I do spend there, I'll start watching my logs very closely to see if they're sending me a bunch of irrelevant junk traffic!
    Last edited by Leader; August 28th, 2006 at 08:25 AM. Reason: too much information

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