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  1. #1
    Newbie bouffoc's Avatar
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    Question Have you quit your day job yet?
    Hi,

    That is to ask, is anyone here able to support themselves, 3 kids, and a spouse SOLELY from what they make as an affiliate?

    I ask because that's my family situation and I'm wondering what it would take to become a stay-at-home dad.

    What strategies do you employ?

    Do you write your own content?
    If not, where and how do you get it?

    How specialized does a site need to be?

    What is your outlay as a % of income in PPC, content, or other traffic-generating investments? (e.g. what's a typical ROI%)

    Thanks,
    Chris

  2. #2
    Lite On The Do, Heavy On The Nuts Donuts's Avatar
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    Yep, I escaped captivity. And I'm happier than even I thought I'd be.

    My best piece of advice is to makes sure you're ready to make the leap - going back would be a nightmare.

    +save up a bankroll nestegg so you can make some mistakes without having to go back to work. have at least 6 months expected income in the bank - the transition is rarely as smooth and trouble-free as you think it will be.

    +have some diversity in your income in case something goes wrong - if more than 1/3rd of your income comes from either a single site or a single niche or a single merchant, one wrong move by something out of your control, can tank you.

    +health insurance is expensive, completely investigate those costs before you leave if you have health benefits in your present job.

    +hard work is needed, real hard work - sometimes, people aren't really ready for that. Make sure both you and your spouse are completely ready.

    +in deciding, it is better to wait (while building a larger nest egg) than to go too early - this opportunity will be here in 6 months and in a year - in fact, it will be bigger and richer then than it is now - it's a growing sector - waiting, while hard, can be the wisest thing to do.

    +there are wonderful feelings of success and contentment waiting for you out here - believe in them - don't give up no matter who tells you it can't be done - it most certainly can - and it takes ALL kinds of people. We are as diverse a community that can be found ANYWHERE in business. There is nothing about you except your own commitment and effort, that can stop you. You are to blame if you fail - and you get ALL of the credit if you succeed. That's heavier than you think right now - in times of toughness, it'll make it hard to breathe. In the good times, it defies gravity.

  3. #3
    The slot machine that IS paid! Billy Kay's Avatar
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    I haven't had a timeclock in over 12 years

    It's not hard to make money here - just tedious - but you have to have the drive and self-discipline

    I just got back from the mailbox 2 minutes ago - there was a check from an Indy for $1400.

    After I give my son his $7 allowance... leaves a lot for a fun weekend

  4. #4
    The slot machine that IS paid! Billy Kay's Avatar
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    oh... and a check for $62.19 from another Indy

  5. #5
    15 years and counting
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    bouffoc - I ask because that's my family situation and I'm wondering what it would take to become a stay-at-home dad.
    If you have a job, keep it.
    It takes years to build a business. First, experiment during your spare time.
    You can make a lot of money but it's not for everybody.
    It's getting tougher year after year. Don't expect to see a ROI during the first month, maybe the first year. You need enough cash in hand to support your family during several months, at least.

  6. #6
    The slot machine that IS paid! Billy Kay's Avatar
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    It's getting tougher year after year.
    Man, someone should start a thread about the good old days: make a link = get money!!!

    Now, besides the fact there are 100,000 competitors with the same exact coupon I have... we have all the people who ... er... find loopholes

  7. #7
    Merchant & ABW Ambassador
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    good tips Donuts, Billy and Zeus.

    You want to keep an eye out for the next big thing or merchant cos that would help you save up for the 6months savings that Donuts is talking about. If you are the first one in, that will give you a slight head start before the 99,999 competitors jump in.

    Anything online, there is no barrier to entry so try to make your money quick before it gets saturated.

    Also have a good business plan and plan for the unexpected.

  8. #8
    ABW Ambassador
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    Another big word of warning. Don't make the decision to jump in after having a great fall. We see this too often, fall is the best season of the year for most affiliates starting out. You are pushing products you know, making sales for xmas. Xmas ends, it all dries up. Make sure you can survive all year round before making the leap.

    Chet

  9. #9
    Newbie bouffoc's Avatar
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    Separate threads?
    Should I start separate threads for the other questions?

    Quote Originally Posted by bouffoc
    What strategies do you employ?

    Do you write your own content?
    If not, where and how do you get it?

    How specialized does a site need to be?

    What is your outlay as a % of income in PPC, content, or other traffic-generating investments? (e.g. what's a typical ROI%)
    Thanks,
    Chris

  10. #10
    http and a telephoto
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    Quote Originally Posted by bouffoc
    Should I start separate threads for the other questions?



    Thanks,
    Chris
    You can find those answers by reading and researching, that isn't the kind of information that is easily available and it is highly specific to each site and your traffic and your products you want to sell or feature.
    Deborah Carney
    TeamLoxly.com BookGoodies.com ABCsPlus.com

  11. #11
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    I have a feeling that very few people manage to quit their day job. I mean you need to earn far more than your day job to have enough confidance this'll last.

  12. #12
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    I quit my day job about 4 1/2 years ago. But I wouldn't suggest quitting with what I was making with affiliate marketing at the time. I quit when I was only making around $200 a month. But I was in a good situation to give it a try. Rent was going to be only $175 a month, car was paid for, no kids, $0 debt so I figured what the hell, give it a shot.

  13. #13
    Member karomesis's Avatar
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    Buoffoc, do you have a business plan written up?

    reinvestment strategies?

    Any business experience?

    In one month I'll probably read about 10-15 business related magazines and the WSJ at least 3 times a week, why? because I can focus on developing trends in various markets and take that to my affiliate marketing strategies.

    This is not a 9-5 grind where you leave for the day and you focus on life. The business IS your life, and when something goes wrong there is no one to take the fall except yourself.

    It's good to have computer/programming experience, but to be honest with you, it's far more important to have the right attitude about making this work. There are plently of really smart programmers out there making ends meet, but they're far from rich, it's all about having the "can do" attitude and not giving up.....ever.

    As machiavelli said..."where the will is great, the difficulties cannot be great".

  14. #14
    Moderator MichaelColey's Avatar
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    6 1/2 years and counting.
    Michael Coley
    Amazing-Bargains.com
     Affiliate Tips | Merchant Best Practices | Affiliate Friendly? | Couponing | CPA Networks? | ABW Tips | Activating Affiliates
    "Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world." Nelson Mandela

  15. #15
    Lite On The Do, Heavy On The Nuts Donuts's Avatar
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    You're way ahead of me MC, but I'm 110% sure that I'm WAY more annoying about it than you could ever be! My friends outside of aff marketing can't stand it when someone brings up my escape from captivity. I go off for hours about being free.

  16. #16
    Merchant & ABW Ambassador
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    . I quit when I was only making around $200 a month. But I was in a good situation to give it a try. Rent was going to be only $175 a month, car was paid for, no kids, $0 debt so I figured what the hell, give it a shot.
    Hopefully, you do not fall sick cos it's gonna cost you an arm and a leg

  17. #17
    ABW Ambassador
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    Quote Originally Posted by FairFieldGetaway-EricEwe
    Hopefully, you do not fall sick cos it's gonna cost you an arm and a leg
    That's what insurance is for.

  18. #18
    Newbie Jedi's Avatar
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    Insurance can't run your campaigns and do marketing for you though.

  19. #19
    ABW Ambassador
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    What? You buy health insurance in case you get sick or hurt.

  20. #20
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    I've been doing this for 20 months now. I'm "lucky" in that I was already self-employed when I first started, in a fairly lucrative field, but the downside is that my other work sucks up a lot of my time, so I'm nowhere near ready to jump totally into affiliate marketing yet.

    Right now I make roughly 20% of my income online. I need to get it up to about 50% before I feel confident enough to shift my focus, turn down more clients, spend more time on my sites. But it's going to happen, I know it.

    The one thing I've discovered is that opportunities pop up all the time. When you can, take advantage of them - they'll take you forward every time. And I love that, unlike my other work which is fee-based, every time I do something - put up a new link, a new page, a new site - that link, page or site has the potential to keep earning day in, day out.

  21. #21
    Newbie Mr. Krabs's Avatar
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    What is your outlay as a % of income in PPC
    Just a piece of practical advice about PPC:

    Unless you have found a great keyword niche, be VERY careful with this. Costs can run up quickly if you don't keep track of your conversion. Besides, if you plan to earn money, why not save on PPC, by creating content instead? In my opinion, PPC advertising other than niche is dangerous, one has a little control of, and unstable. On the other hand, a good content is more predictable (traffic-wise) and relatively prone to fluctuation.

    Anyone, please feel free to correct me if you think I'm wrong.

  22. #22
    Crazy Cat Lady Heidi's Avatar
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    Hmm I haven't had a job with someone else since about 1994 - been building websites since 1996 - I admit I was "lucky" because I was a bored stay at home mother/wife when I stumbled into affiliate marketing but I have been the full time supporter of my family since about 2000.
    Heidi
    "Happy are those who dream dreams and are willing to pay the price to make them come true"

  23. #23
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    I quit may day job in March and things have been off to a slow start. I am with a partner on sites and that seems to help me quite a bit. It was pretty easy to scale up but we have combined 7 years or more of experience doing this, just the first time we are doing it full time.

    We both knew what we were getting into way before we jumped into and had a good year of income saved so we could pay bills w/out taking on a job. Also we supplemented the jump by having consulting clients (arguably just as bad, if not worse then a day job).

    We planned for a year and made goals of where we want to be, 25 a day, 50 a day, 100 a day, 250 a day, 500 a day...

    7/8 months later we have a full time programmer an on call designer and 20 or so built out sites... so things are going as planned. Still we are well shy of our income that we had at our day jobs last year, but the freedom we now have more than makes up for it. We have been lazy though and enjoy not having bosses. We were able to fire our annoying clients and cherry pick any leads we get.

    There is big money in this industry but you have to work hard to get it.

    I would suggest working the day job (current gig) and the night job (aff) until the night job surpases the day income for 3 consecutive months. Also I would make sure the income is diverse and not just from one site, unless the site can generate income if your main source of traffic goes away (think SE algo change).

    Just remember that your knowledge is scalable in this industry, if you can make 1 site makes money and you know how and why, you can scale it to 5+ sites or 50+ sites if you know how to replicate why it worked in the first place.

  24. #24
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    Also to make thing fare, my partner and I are both young, single with zero dependants, so I was at much less risk to make the jump.

  25. #25
    ABW Ambassador erninator's Avatar
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    Mostly independant since 1970 with both online and offline home businesses. During tough times I had to get a day j*b, but kept the home business going by moonlighting. Last j*b ended in 1981. Diversify your online business to avoid the ups and downs. Don't give up the j*b until you can save up 6 months income. When you quit, many friends and family will think you have it made, but actually you'll spend more time and effort working at home. Don't expect anyone to understand it. Just do what works and stop doing what doesn't work. Keep truckin'.
    ~Ernie

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