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  1. #1
    Affiliate Manager Alan Hamilton's Avatar
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    Working At Home
    Read this article this morning. I was rather surprised with the % of people, who given the option, prefer to work in the office.

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  2. #2
    Full Member RickPlmr's Avatar
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    Not me - I'm working hard to get to the point where I can work from home.... especially since I have severe Restless Legs - it would be nice to be able to work out or walk around when I need to instead of struggling to hold still in meetings when my legs are flipping out (and medication doesn't always kick in when I need it to).

    I'd also love to be able to focus more on family life, and I think by being here at home I could do that easier, and work only when they're in school.

    My original goal was to at least be able to quit my part-time second job, and I'm there this month income-wise... just need to see these kinds of revenues for another few months before letting the side gig go.

    Then the next step will be to focus on replacing my main job, which will be tough since it pays really well. Then again, if the stories I hear on this forum all the time are true (and I believe they are), then I'll eventually be able to make even more than I'm making now working fulltime.

  3. #3
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    When I tell people that I'm self-employed and work at home they usually comment, "Oh I wish I could do that!" My standard response is to ask them if they consider themself to be a "people person." The answer is invariably "yes." At that point I tell them that the isolation of working at home would probably drive them crazy.

    This isn't a good job for anyone who needs a lot of structure or people contact. Fortunately I have the dogs to keep me company but they're lousy conversationalists.

  4. #4
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    It doesn't seem all that suprising to me. Althoguh many of us compalin and say we wish we could work from home everyday, I kind of prefer to be in an office. Back in the cubicle days it made me want an office for pure superficial reasons. Then when I got an office I wanted a bigger one. Then when I got that, I wanted a window one.
    Now I want the corner one with a private bathroom and a butler LMAO, wouldn't that be nice!

    The office environment really helps motivate some of us to continuously push ourselves and achieve more. Although it is fun to work in pajamas, some of us need to see what our peers are doing and use it to motivate ourselves to become better and the best. Depending on the department, we are offered to work from home, however a majority of us prefer to come in everyday. Also as Rhea mentioned, it helps to be social and it is fun to always have someone right nextdoor to go to lunch and take a break with or just to talk to.
    Adam Riemer Marketing, LLC. Online Marketing Blog and Affiliate Management Company
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  5. #5
    Affiliate Manager Alan Hamilton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Liquidate
    The office environment really helps motivate some of us to continuously push ourselves and achieve more. Although it is fun to work in pajamas, some of us need to see what our peers are doing and use it to motivate ourselves to become better and the best. Depending on the department, we are offered to work from home, however a majority of us prefer to come in everyday. Also as Rhea mentioned, it helps to be social and it is fun to always have someone right nextdoor to go to lunch and take a break with or just to talk to.


    This is an important factor to both the employee and the employer. I am in the midst of transitioning our operations to the guys working from home. It starts the end of this month.

    My three biggest concerns were, and will probably continue to be (until I see the results)

    1.) team environment
    2.) self discipline
    3.) spontaneous interaction

    I've always preferred the team environment, so people could support each other face to face, discuss spontaneous ideas, problem solutions, etc etc.

    Self discipline is also a big part of the equation. I've known many an employee of various firms who worked from home and many of them became less productive rather than more. Of course if someone isn't working out at home, his/her employer has the option to pull them back in, or replace them. But by then the loss of production has already adversely impacted the company, especially in the case of small businesses.

    Spontaneous personal interaction, discussion, lunching and breaks with other peers is also a good motivator, and when 10 people who used to work under one roof are suddenly spread over 10 separate locations, internet communication can not take the place of personal contact.

    If a person is a one man/girl show, it's different. But if a person is "thinking" about working from home, they really need to explore the realities of their adaptability to self discipline, self motivation and lack of personal interface with team mates of a common goal.

    Alan
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  6. #6
    Affiliate Manager MINDsprinter's Avatar
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    I just started the work at home thing this year and I love it! Of course, the collaboration is harder, but I can't see myself going back anytime soon.
    Jason Rosenbaum
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  7. #7
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    I've been working from home for most of the past 13+ years (ever since I first got a cable modem at home). For two years before that, I rented a single office in an executive suite. Most recently, when I married an apartment manager (who must live on site), I rented the apartment upstairs to use as my office.

    So, during the past 25 years, I've:
    - worked in companies with other employees
    - worked "solo" but in an office suite with others
    - worked "solo" at home alone
    - worked "solo" in my upstairs apartment

    Most recently, I'm finding that my productivity sometimes drops because I'm "too available" here. My wife asks me to run errands, etc. since she knows I'm right here; I also often take breaks to just sit and watch TV (DVRs are great) with her. If I were in an office even a block away, that wouldn't happen so often.

    Because my office is "right here," I don't face the same pressure or guilt about "going home to spend time with my family." That cuts both ways: I am more available to my family, but I'm also more available to work. I never leave my home; I never leave my office.

    (It occurs to me that if I were placed on "house arrest" with an ankle monitor, my life would barely change -- except to free me from running to pick up the kid at school and buy groceries.)

    I really liked the "executive suite" arrangement, where I shared an office suite with other folks who also "worked alone." There were opportunities to chat, trade ideas, go to lunch, etc. with a variety of people.

    Of course, with the internet, I never really leave the office. Here, my office is upstairs in a separate apartment, yet any time I want, I can use my wife's computer to do 60% of the same tasks (check email, ABW, AdWords, etc.).

    Renting the apartment upstairs for an office did provide one other benefit: I never have to deal with upstairs neighbors stomping around or making too much noise at night.

  8. #8
    ABW Ambassador MoneyBusiness's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by markwelch
    Most recently, I'm finding that my productivity sometimes drops because I'm "too available" here.
    I find that my productivity drops almost to half, if I'm sitting in my living room, while doing work (when I'm at home doing work). It's during that time my dog wants to play bite-your-arm, or my favorite show comes on, or I get a phone call, or switching radio stations, and countless other things.

    That doesn't happen as often anymore, as I force myself to go into my small office. When I do that, it's amazing how much work is actually done. No more 3 hour stints just to do something that should only take half an hour.

  9. #9
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    Some people are well suited to working from home, and usually we are people that don't keep "normal" working hours either

    And it isn't for everyone. If I had a significant other that also worked from home, it would get pretty loud some days if he was as vocal on the phone or hollering at his computer as I am. So at that point I would need an office to contain myself With it being just me, my office is my dining room, with a view out the patio doors.

    As far as restless legs, I have plenty of room to wander around and take off for a drive if I need a change of scenery. When you are in an office you can't always do that

    I think the key is partially self motivation and partially whether you have time and space to yourself at home where you can work uninterrupted, or where your family understands that you are working. When I was in Rochester working from the kitchen and Alec (the now 7 year old) was at my house for the day, he knew when I was working and when it was ok to ask me to play. Same thing when he was here last week. We had play time and I had work time, and he entertained himself (mostly with goodies from Summit )

    It doesn't work for everyone.
    Deborah Carney
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  10. #10
    Moderator MichaelColey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by markwelch
    Most recently, I'm finding that my productivity sometimes drops because I'm "too available" here. My wife asks me to run errands, etc. since she knows I'm right here; I also often take breaks to just sit and watch TV (DVRs are great) with her. If I were in an office even a block away, that wouldn't happen so often.

    Because my office is "right here," I don't face the same pressure or guilt about "going home to spend time with my family." That cuts both ways: I am more available to my family, but I'm also more available to work. I never leave my home; I never leave my office.
    Too true!
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  11. #11
    Newbie bizzer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ALH - AmeritrustRx
    Read this article this morning. I was rather surprised with the % of people, who given the option, prefer to work in the office.
    Very true for me. There were a couple years of my life when I quit Motorola and worked at home on my fledgling online business. It was hard. I mean, I totally procrastinated and did not have many friends and felt depressed most of the time.

    Of course, when business expanded and I started an office, and had to go to work in a real work environment, things became a lot more productive, at least for me personally.

  12. #12
    Newbie ronaldmarva's Avatar
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    Working At Home
    There are advantages and disadvantages in having your employees work at home but the bottom line, on the point of the employer, is that productivity should not suffer.
    The articles mentioned that employers who take on this policy reports an increase in productivy, employee retention and cost-savings for them. This is a good prospect for employers and I think this would be a good practice.

  13. #13
    Affiliate Manager cbsturg's Avatar
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    My wife and I are starting into this pretty heavily now. While I'm working to establish my affiliate businesses (I'm only 26 - how much practical experience can I have?), I got a job offer to leave the University I program for and do their web development from home. As my wife is 36 weeks pregnant (like a balloon that's waiting to pop at any time...), I'm both excited and nervous about taking this new job (but with the pay being 3-4 TIMES what I'm making now, it's a no-brainer).

    Excited: I get to actually see my wife and little girl-to-be. It's always bothered me that I spend more hours with my co-workers than with my family.

    Nervous: With a crying newborn and a wife who's going to need a lot of attention, will I be able to find time to work effectively and put in the hours needed?

    I know it can be done, but I'm not disillusioned into thinking that this adjustment will come naturally. I hopeful we can establish a basic set of rules such that between certain hours I work, and the other hours I don't (I'll have to cut back on my reading of ABW - stupid addictive forum...). All in all, I think the pros outweigh the cons, and I want to give it a shot.
    Chris Sturgill
    "All my life I've had one dream, to achieve my many goals." - H. Simpson

  14. #14
    Affiliate Manager Alan Hamilton's Avatar
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    Chris, first of all congratulations on your upcoming new born! Kids rock!

    As for working effectively at home, I recommend that you have a constructive heart to heart conversation about what it is going to require, the privacy it will take during your scheduled work hours (which you can somewhat determine based on the baby's sleep habits) etc. Then YOU need to exercise the self discipline to work productively at home. I had that very conversation with my wife, and later with our children as they grew, and as long as I communicated the importance to give them an ongoing understanding of how important it was, it worked out great!

    Best Of Luck!

    Alan
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  15. #15
    Troll Killer and best Snooper!
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    The worst thing about working at home for me is that the mid-winter cabin fever blues get really bad. When the weather's nice I can take a break outdoors and that refreshes me a lot. In winter that's not an option. (Today's high is supposed to be 14 degrees AND it's windy, too.)

    I can't wait for Spring!!!

  16. #16
    Moderator BurgerBoy's Avatar
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    It's suppose to be 55 degrees here today.

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  17. #17
    Moderator MichaelColey's Avatar
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    71 today here!
    Michael Coley
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  18. #18
    Resident Genius and Staunch Capitalist Leader's Avatar
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    The issue of working at home is secondary to the fact that the people in the poll are empl*yees! They don't know what freedom IS, let alone appreciate it.
    Working from home while empl*yed sounds akin to having a tether. Better than jail, but it's not freedom, either!

    However, the tether would beat the jail for numerous reasons:
    No set schedule. I don't keep a regular sleep schedule--and that's just how my body runs. If something's gotta give, it's always going to be the other stuff...like j*bs.

    No direct interaction with twits who should be deported to a deserted island and forgotten about!

    No "teamie" BS. The only "common goal" I've had with the peasants in places I've w*rked in, was to collect a check and not get canned. That does not make a team. Plus, a company saying it promotes "teamwork" is usually using code for "management ignores workplace bullying, never gives clear orders, and has a management heirarchy that's clear as mud (and includes "unofficial" managers)." The best places I w*rked for never mentioned the word "team" and were straight-up bureaucracies: It was easy to tell what everyone's duties were, who was a real boss, and--importantly--whose comments were NOT to be taken as orders. Nice and straightforward, management-wise and duty-wise. But even then there was some intra-employee BS to deal with.

    Nitpicking idiots are out of range.

    Smoking is always allowed. So are food and beverages, breaks, etc.

    No demeaning asking permission for basic things like using the bathroom, or having to see if it is "okay" to have food while on the job!

    And NO GOING OUT in the cold!

    That said, if I had MY OWN office, in FL--NOT as some empl*yee--I could see some benefits to it. As the Boss, I wouldn't have to put up with any of the abovementioned BS. The building itself isn't the problem, it's what goes on in it. And no crap would be going on in it if I was the owner of it! Plus, it'd always be open...for me, anyway.

    Provided the building was in FL, and south enough where it'll never get cold enough to snow, benefits to me would include:

    Office/light-industrial districts are usually on the regular route of major shippers, unlike houses. And, the entrances to these buildings are usually a lot easier to get stuff to and from. The typical big shipping door completes the picture.
    Storage: Various forms of stock and shipping supplies are around here. It'd be nicer if I had another building to put 'em in. Especially since I think I'll end up doing merchant sites like I do aff sites: In quantity!

    I wouldn't have to feign an interest in conversation while playing games!
    No infernal TVs around.

    And it'd just be cool to have my own building. It'd probably have to be *my own* building...sometimes rented/leased offices are no-smoking. Can't have that.
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  19. #19
    Affiliate Manager cbsturg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ALH - AmeritrustRx
    Chris, first of all congratulations on your upcoming new born! Kids rock!

    As for working effectively at home, I recommend that you have a constructive heart to heart conversation about what it is going to require, the privacy it will take during your scheduled work hours (which you can somewhat determine based on the baby's sleep habits) etc. Then YOU need to exercise the self discipline to work productively at home. I had that very conversation with my wife, and later with our children as they grew, and as long as I communicated the importance to give them an ongoing understanding of how important it was, it worked out great!

    Best Of Luck!

    Alan
    Thanks for the vote of confidence. We've talked a bit about it, and I'm already in the habit of waking up around 4:30 in the morning to get work done before the Mrs. wakes up. That might be adjusted a bit once the little girl comes and 4:30 becomes a time that I go to bed instead of wake up...

    I appreciate your advice. D-day in two weeks. I'll keep the group apprised.
    Chris Sturgill
    "All my life I've had one dream, to achieve my many goals." - H. Simpson

  20. #20
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    But it's a little bit boring to work at home along

  21. #21
    Affiliate Manager Alan Hamilton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Onix
    But it's a little bit boring to work at home along

    I hear what you are saying, and would not disagree with you as that part varies by individual mental and emotional makeup. I actually LOVE working alone because I can truly focus on what I am doing.

    A big part of not feeling bored (from being alone) is to ask yourself honestly to what degree you enjoy your "alone" work. If you have a passion for what you do, then you are anxious to get up every day and get started. The time flies by when you are engrossed in what you are doing that you enjoy so much.

    On the other hand, if you are not passionate about what you do, as in "I am only doing it to make some money" - then you lack a very important part of the formula to working at home.

    I hope this helps you out a bit. If your bottom line is that you have to be around activity and other people to be fulfilled with your work, then working at home may not be the answer.

    Alan
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  22. #22
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    I used to like working alone but then got bored and changed the job. I'm working at the office now, the same kind of job, and feel better. Probably just can't be too long without people

  23. #23
    Affiliate Manager Alan Hamilton's Avatar
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    I hear ya On - we're probably a bit apart in age, so let me know how you feel about it in 20 years
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  24. #24
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    I'm 25

  25. #25
    ABW Ambassador erninator's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ALH - AmeritrustRx
    I actually LOVE working alone because I can truly focus on what I am doing.

    A big part of not feeling bored (from being alone) is to ask yourself honestly to what degree you enjoy your "alone" work. If you have a passion for what you do, then you are anxious to get up every day and get started. The time flies by when you are engrossed in what you are doing that you enjoy so much.

    Alan
    Good point, Alan. I've worked at home since 1970, but have had some office j*bs from time to time. I've heard so many people wish they could work at home, but most of them only see the "freedom" part not realizing how much effort it really takes. It takes a lot more time and effort to produce a decent income from your home business. I put in more hours than most people with regular j*bs. I don't get paid vacations or other benefits. If I take time off, it's just a day without pay.

    I have a couple businesses at home, both online and offline. It gives me some variety and help diversify my income. I run my offline architectural design business from home, so I get a chance to visit with clients and get out of the office to visit their building sites. I specialize in mountain homes/log homes, so I get to spend time in the mountains (fishing rod in back seat).

    The quiet time (from 4:00 AM 'til the phone rings) is essential for the creative process whether it's designing a custom home or building another landing page. I have 4-5 productive hours completed before most people get their workday started.

    The only way I make it work is to have passion for what I'm doing. I would do what I enjoy most, even if there was no money involved. My dad once asked me if I have a business or a hobby. I took that as a negative remark, but over the years realized that's the driving force that motivates my daily activities.
    ~Ernie

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