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  1. #1
    ABW Ambassador Vrindavan's Avatar
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    Question HomeSchooling ?
    HomeSchooling ?

    Are you a homeschooler before ?
    or homeschooling your kids ?

    i wonder how can you homeschool your kid while busy at your affiliate marketing ? (Assume no other will help you at home)

  2. #2
    Web Ho - Design B!tch ~Michelle's Avatar
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    I homeschooled my daughter from 5th grade through 9th. She went back to public school once she started 9th grade.

    Homeschooling takes way less time than a regular school day and she got a lot more covered and done compared to what they get done in school.

    We had about 3 hours of lessons each day, and then she would continue to explore what she was learning at her own leisure. Some days took a little bit longer, and we only did actual school work 4 days a week. I did grade her work using the same grading scale that the school did, because she was already used to gauging her success based on grades, and we knew she would be going back at some point, so we wanted to stay with something familiar. I had about 6 hours of prep time each month.

    Also, my son was a toddler during that time frame, so I had him to contend with, and my husband worked everyday, so I did it all basically on my own.

    Needless to say, I had plenty of time for affiliate work, plus my website design business, housekeeping, etc.
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  3. #3
    Moderator MichaelColey's Avatar
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    We'll be homeschooling our kids. Gabriel just turned four and Grace is just one, so we haven't started yet. My wife has been "retired" for seven years, so we're both home with the kids. She'll be doing most of the teaching, but I'll be teaching some subjects as well. I've heard from other homeschool parents that the actual teaching often just takes a couple hours a day.

    With the freedom of affiliate marketing, I'm looking forward to some of the flexibility this will provide. Geography will certainly be more "hands on".
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  4. #4
    Affiliate Manager adambha's Avatar
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    If you're interested in homeschooling, I'd *highly* recommend taking a look at a book by A.S. Neill titled "Summerhill." Well, it's not just a book, Summerhill is a school that he ran for many years and still exists in the UK today and is headed by his daughter.

    It might even be a little too radical for some, though. One of the key ideas of Summerhill is that you *must* let the children decide for themselves when and how they learn, no student is ever compelled to attend classes. This is quite literal. If the child does not want to attend classes for 5 years, so be it.

    It's a bit unpalatable out of context, but with the full picture is a very compelling educational philosophy.

  5. #5
    Mama in Charge Anne's Avatar
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    I home schooled my kids four years ( two years each for varied reasons). It only took a couple of hours a day. You have to remember that 75% of the school day in "real" school is wasted time. Waiting to take your turn, moving from place to place, doing busy work ( worksheets and stuff). The amount of 1:1 direct instruction to your child is extremely low and any instruction is subject to interruption from another student. I worked with my son for less than 2 hours a day and he tested in the 99th percentile at the end of the year. My daughter jumped two reading grade levels in 6 weeks working with me one hour a day five days a week. Huge difference from public school where her level didn't move for two years.

    My sister does the "unschooling" approach as listed above. Personally that makes me nervous though her kids are all A students and 2 of 3 of them are on college continuing with A's.... It must work or her kids are just extremely naturally smart.

  6. #6
    Affiliate Manager Alan Hamilton's Avatar
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    For those who have home schooled your children, did it affect how they interacted with other children once they were either back in traditional classes? Was it a difficult adjustment for them to "fit in" with other school children? While they were in their home school years, who did they interact with outside the house? Ours are all grown up now, but I've often wondered about the social interaction with peers aspect of home schooling.
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  7. #7
    Mama in Charge Anne's Avatar
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    Lack of social interaction ( no offense) is one of the silliest arguments against homeschooling.

    Studies have shown that home schooled children actual have a higher ability to socialize and interact with varied age groups than their publically schooled peers.

    Homeschooled kids are typically immersed in activities outside of the home and with varied ages of kids and adults. Children need to learn to interact with everyone, not just people of their own age. Kids in regular school are in an artificial environment, typically only paired with children of their own age group, and everything is regulated by adults that serve as dictators. All decisions for peer interaction ( time, place and method) are typically decided by adults... In a homeschooled environment, kids typically pick what they want to do, and are immersed in groups that have kids from 5 to 18 years old for most activities. They learn how to interact with both older and younger children, kids their own age, and adults. Also, don't forget about soccer, basketball, little league, scouting, and all of the other activities homeschooled kids can do just like kids in school. Homeschooled kids also live in neighborhoods, typically, and play with the other kids after school like everyone else. My kids had more stuff going on with other kids when they were homeschooled than they do now. Now our afternoons are filled with homework and studying for tests. No time for them to get out with other kids and play except weekends, and often they get assignments then, too.

    I guess I could go on and on but truly, though there are some very radical homeschoolers that isolate their children, they are really an exception to the rule.

  8. #8
    Mama in Charge Anne's Avatar
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    Being the neurotic person I am, I had to pull some research to support my post. There is endless research you can find on Google supporting my claims above, but here is something to glance at for now if you don't feel like Googling:

    1992 study summary:
    "From the findings of these two studies, it would appear that the concerns expressed by teachers, administrators, and legislators about socialization and home schooling are unfounded. Indeed, Bliss (1989) contends that it is in the formal educational system's setting that children first experience negative socialization, conformity, and peer pressure. According to her, "This is a setting of large groups, segmented by age, with a variation of authority figures...the individual, with his/her developmental needs, becomes overpowered by the expectations and demand of others--equal in age and equally developmentally needy."


    another study
    "Regarding socialization, it appears that very few home-schooling children are socially deprived. Critics who speak out against home schooling on the basis of social deprivation are actually addressing an area which favors home schoolers. Apparently, the research data indicates that it is the conventionally schooled child who is actually deprived."

    You might also find this article interesting
    Socialization: A Great Reason Not to Go to School
    http://learninfreedom.org/socialization.html

    This is profound:
    The same year that Shyers completed his doctoral degree thesis research on homeschooling socialization, Thomas Smedley completed master's degree research at Radford University in Virginia, with a similar experimental design. Smedley compared twenty home-schooled children to thirteen public school children, matching the children as best he could by relevant demographic characteristics. His study used the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, which evaluate communication skills, socialization, and daily living skills. Smedley found that the home-schooled children were more mature according to the scoring rubrics of the Vineland scales, scoring in the 84th percentile, while the public school children scored in the 27th percentile. Thus the Shyers finding supports a nearly simultaneous finding by a different researcher, who used a different social science evaluation procedure on a different sample population. Such a replicated finding is unusual in social science.

  9. #9
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    What about meeting girls? Lots more to choose from in a school system.

    According to a 2000-2001 Barna survey:

    The study indicated that homeschoolers are 39 percent less likely to be college graduates, 21 percent more likely to be married, 28 percent less likely to have experienced a divorce, and that the household income is 10% below the national average.

    I guess there is good and bad in that, depending on how you look at that.

  10. #10
    Internet Cowboy
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    I have no kids, but if I did, I would most likely home school them. The only option to the awful public schools we have in most cities are private schools that are often just as bad as the public schools.
    I have many friends in the education system and I am amazed of the stories I hear. Teachers and administrators apparently spend 90% of their time and effort dealing with the 10% of the kids who do nothing but cause trouble and the school's hands are tied. They can't remove the kids like you could when I was in school. Not to get political, but "no child left behind" seems to be somewhat of a joke and allows the bad kids to get away with even more disruptive behavior.

  11. #11
    What's the word? Rhia7's Avatar
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    I went to both private and public schools.

    The one great experience I had in public school was the generous arts & crafts programs not available in a private school (and it wouldn't have been available in my home either).

    I was able to work with Plaster of Paris (messy projects ) in public school but I wouldn't have had that chance in either private school or had I been home schooled.

    Certain subjects probably can be taught by the parents very well but there might be some areas where the child might do better and/or have more opportunities in a school (public or private).

    Just my 2 cents
    Last edited by Rhia7; April 7th, 2007 at 07:00 PM.
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  12. #12
    Affiliate Manager Alan Hamilton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anne
    Being the neurotic person I am, I had to pull some research to support my post. There is endless research you can find on Google supporting my claims above, but here is something to glance at for now if you don't feel like Googling:.

    Ann,

    LOL, I didn't ask the questions as an argument for or against home schooling. Just wonder about it as I have no experience with it. I respect the wishes of individual parents when it comes to our respective children. I tend to think it can be a good thing provided the parents give a quality effort and are reasonably capable. Just curious about the social interaction aspects.

    Alan
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  13. #13
    Affiliate Manager Alan Hamilton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by UncleScooter
    I have no kids, but if I did, I would most likely home school them. The only option to the awful public schools we have in most cities are private schools that are often just as bad as the public schools.
    I have many friends in the education system and I am amazed of the stories I hear. Teachers and administrators apparently spend 90% of their time and effort dealing with the 10% of the kids who do nothing but cause trouble and the school's hands are tied. They can't remove the kids like you could when I was in school. Not to get political, but "no child left behind" seems to be somewhat of a joke and allows the bad kids to get away with even more disruptive behavior.
    The problem with disruptive children and lack of discipline has been growing for many years Scoot. It is primarily a socio-economic problem. "No child left behind" didn't cause disruptive students, or empower the problem makers; a lack of parental supervision and installing basic values in the home is more applicable to the problem. When you and I were children, our parents were more involved in our day to day lives. We ate dinner as a family, we had chores that we were expected to do, we got disciplined when we didn't listen to our parents or teachers. Our parents taught us (and enforced) the value of respect for others, and certainly for our teachers. Teachers also had more disciplinary authority, and often exercised it. (they could also hug a child who was in need of a hug). That disappeared after schools were sued enough by parents whose children can do no wrong, etc etc etc.

    That's one of the reasons that I tend to think that home schooling might just be a good thing; especially if the parents are home employed and able to spend more time with the kiddies.

    With the sad state of affairs in our public schook systems, I like the option of home schooling, provided the parents are reasonably well schooled themselves, and actually give a meaningful effort to insuring their children receive quality education.
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  14. #14
    Mama in Charge Anne's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ALH - AmeritrustRx
    Ann,

    LOL, I didn't ask the questions as an argument for or against home schooling.
    Alan
    Oh sorry, you asked about socialization and honestly, everyone asks about that, so I figured I would post research. That is how my brain works, didn't mean to go off in la la land with supporting evidence, haha!

  15. #15
    Affiliate Manager Alan Hamilton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anne
    Oh sorry, you asked about socialization and honestly, everyone asks about that, so I figured I would post research. That is how my brain works, didn't mean to go off in la la land with supporting evidence, haha!

    LOL. no problem Anne. We adopted our eldest son when he was 1 year old. I have many times gotten the incredible question: "do you love him the same way that you love "your own" children? So I can relate to your thoughts when you hear questions about home schooling. You're loaded for bear and ready to pounce!! Thanks for your research and congrats on the effort you have put into your children.

    Alan
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  16. #16
    Mama in Charge Anne's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ALH - AmeritrustRx
    LOL. no problem Anne. We adopted our eldest son when he was 1 year old. I have many times gotten the incredible question: "do you love him the same way that you love "your own" children? So I can relate to your thoughts when you hear questions about home schooling. You're loaded for bear and ready to pounce!! Thanks for your research and congrats on the effort you have put into your children.

    Alan
    OMG how RUDE of people!!!

  17. #17
    Outsourced Program Manager Affiliate Eagle's Avatar
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    I don't plan to home school my son in the future, however I've heard from very close friends nothing but postive things for those who have sacrificed the time and made the commitment to homeschooling. I've heard that one draw back is Social development, however its hasnt been all too bad.

    As I mentioned before, I have numerous friends who have taken this path and good things have come about because of it.
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  18. #18
    Life is Supposed to be Fun! Rexanne's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ALH - AmeritrustRx
    The problem with disruptive children and lack of discipline has been growing for many years Scoot. It is primarily a socio-economic problem. "No child left behind" didn't cause disruptive students, or empower the problem makers; a lack of parental supervision and installing basic values in the home is more applicable to the problem. When you and I were children, our parents were more involved in our day to day lives. We ate dinner as a family, we had chores that we were expected to do, we got disciplined when we didn't listen to our parents or teachers. Our parents taught us (and enforced) the value of respect for others, and certainly for our teachers. Teachers also had more disciplinary authority, and often exercised it. (they could also hug a child who was in need of a hug). That disappeared after schools were sued enough by parents whose children can do no wrong, etc etc etc.
    Well said, Alan. I'm gonna refrain from jumping all over this subject or it'll derail the original thread focus. :-)

    Home school can actually be an easier way for some kids to learn, a lot of kids do better in a home school environment.

    I, too, was very curious about the socialization aspect. Thanks for the detailed explanation, Anne. Good to know kids don't suffer social consequences by not being in school with their peers. If those peers are in gang or otherwise scary, dangerous infested waters, I'd say home school over public school. Although I know quite a few teachers who prefer to work in the public system, mostly to be able to reach those scary types and help them through the system. I consider them the best teachers I know, so who's to say?

    I think it depends on the child. Where he/she will most thrive and learn are equally important. Older kids can pretty much home school themselves, too.
    Peace,

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  19. #19
    Web Ho - Design B!tch ~Michelle's Avatar
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    Socialization was not a problem for us. Our daughter continued to stay in contact with all the kids she was friends with before we pulled her out of school to homeschool her. She attended school dances and sport events, was in girl scouts and also attended Awanas for a short time.

    She also spent time visiting with all our neighbors, many of which are senior citizens. They would discuss how the world has changed, etc and they would share things that they had learned with her. Like one neighbor could speak and write Japanese, so he taught her the basics of that.

    My kids can sit down with anyone or any age group and have a comfortable conversation with them. We are always getting compliments on how great that is.

    Out of all the homeschoolers I know, there is only one family that their kids are a bit strange when it comes to social situations, but this family never made an effort to make sure the kids were in different social situations, and the whole family were basically homebodies and kinda clandish, so they may have ended up that way, homeschooled or not.

    I always have to laugh when people find out someone homeschools and they say "If they don't go to school, they will never learn to socialize and will be socially retarded."

    Well, back in the day when I went to school, the teachers were always telling us "Hush up. You are here to learn, not to socialize!" *LOL*

    Also, think of it this way. Saying kids need go to school to learn to socialize with people their own age so they can succeed out in the real world makes no sense when you apply it to real life. Say you get a job in a grocery store, does your boss put only the 33 year olds in charge of stocking, only the 28 year olds in charge of cleaning, 60 year olds only as cashiers, etc? Nope. You work with people of all ages.




    Quote Originally Posted by ALH - AmeritrustRx
    For those who have home schooled your children, did it affect how they interacted with other children once they were either back in traditional classes? Was it a difficult adjustment for them to "fit in" with other school children? While they were in their home school years, who did they interact with outside the house? Ours are all grown up now, but I've often wondered about the social interaction with peers aspect of home schooling.
    ~Michelle
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  20. #20
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    My wife home-schooled ours until the eldest was ready for 4th grade. She did a great job because he did quite well at a school where 4th grade is a very tough class.

    Looking back, homeschooling wasn't easy and we are delighted with the school they attend now.

  21. #21
    Life is Supposed to be Fun! Rexanne's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ~Michelle

    I always have to laugh when people find out someone homeschools and they say "If they don't go to school, they will never learn to socialize and will be socially retarded."

    Well, back in the day when I went to school, the teachers were always telling us "Hush up. You are here to learn, not to socialize!" *LOL*
    Good point, Michelle. Now, I think because kids don't learn worth a dam in most schools, they rely on the "socialization" aspect to keep kids attending public schools. Most private schools are religion-based and so a lot of parents don't realize this is an option that isn't necessarily gonna force-feed religion to their kids.

    Quote Originally Posted by ~Michelle
    Also, think of it this way. Saying kids need go to school to learn to socialize with people their own age so they can succeed out in the real world makes no sense when you apply it to real life. Say you get a job in a grocery store, does your boss put only the 33 year olds in charge of stocking, only the 28 year olds in charge of cleaning, 60 year olds only as cashiers, etc? Nope. You work with people of all ages.
    Another very good point.
    Love it when the intellectuals come out to play in here.
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  22. #22
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    I can understand that if where you live the schools are just horrible for whatever reasons and you can make arguments on both sides, but playing devil's advocate/random thoughts:

    What would account for:

    "The study indicated that homeschoolers are 39 percent less likely to be college graduates"

    Are parents qualified to teach their kids, if they're doing it on their own compared to bringing in tutors? Are they getting a full education in various subjects from qualifed instructors?

    There are no social benefits to going to public school? Like learning there are different people in the world with different views? How to deal and get along with different people?

    Do you think you're sheltering your kids? Eventually they're going to have to go out on their own. If they go to college, they're going to have teachers and other students. Why are they 39% less likely to graduate from college?

    What is the worry from public schools? Is it more safety issues, actual education, teachings or subjects that you don't want them to learn/alternate views on such things as sex, religion etc?

  23. #23
    ABW Veteran Mr. Sal's Avatar
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    What about meeting girls? Lots more to choose from in a school system.
    I have to answer that quote, because I have to agree with that part!

    But, there are more chicks outside of the farm anyway.

  24. #24
    ABW Veteran Mr. Sal's Avatar
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    Your kids are your seeds, and in order to have a good harvest, you should decide wisely, where do you plant those seeds, whether indoor or outdoor, both places have their advantages and disadvantages, so as long as you can keep an eye on how those plants are growing, most of the times it should really make no big difference at the end.

    But, this is some of what I think today (2007) about Home-School, Public-School.

    Home-School

    Good:
    1 - Learn about family values from your family (supposedly all should be good.)
    2 - Not be exposed to School peer pressure (gangs, drugs, sex, etc.)
    3 - You can see them grow up safely at home (you always will know what they're doing.)
    4 - You will have the control on what friends they have (most their friends would be from the small pool of neighborhood kids.)
    5 - You can save money on gas, school supplies, (uniforms, lunch money, hip-hop clothes, Nike's, backpacks, etc.)

    Bad:
    1 - Learn all about family values from your family only (so, unfortunately they can also learn bad habits too.)
    2 - Could be exposed to family problems (drugs [from alcohol to Zanot.], family feud [not the Tv. show, but real family feud about anything.], sibling rivaling, etc.)
    3 - You can see them grow up at home but, you always will know what they're doing (and they will have no privacy in what they're doing, or want to do.)
    4 - You will have limited the amount of friends they can have but, (if all of the available friends from the neighborhood are mostly bad apples, they can spoil your kid, also, if all of the available friends from the neighborhood are of the same sex only, it might take many years before your kid interact, play, or even see another kid from the opposite sex.)
    5 - You may have to spend some money on (exercise devices in order to keep the kid in shape, some doctor bills from the time that you may had to take the kid to see a doctor, because the kid was showing signs of depression, lonely, or unsociable behavior.)


    Public School

    Good:
    1 - They supposedly should get a Real Education (learn to read, write, learn what they desire to learn, graduate and then became a productive and responsible member of the human race.)
    2 - At least they supposedly should learn the same basic things, and at about the same time, that all of the other kids of the same ages are learning (for better or worse.)
    3 - Being able to interact with more kids of the same and different ages (find real friends and build some friendship that can last a lifetime, find their first love even if it only last for one semester.)
    4 - Having some other classmates to study with (something that can be very important before some complicated subject test.)

    Bad:
    1 - Gangs (protection, bullies, intimidation's, peer pressure.)
    2 - Drugs (exposure, from alcohol to Zanot, peer pressure, experiment.)
    3 - Sex (too young for that, pregnancy, std, body piercing.)
    4 - Violence (never knowing if and when, one or more of the classmates is going to go postal at that school.)

    ------------------------

    But after all the bad things that have being going on at most of the schools for the last ten to fifteen years, if I was born again knowing what I know today, I probably would not waste over a decade of a lifetime going to school everyday again.

    Today (2007) I believe that with the current technology of the internet, and with all of the available home study materials about everything you can think of just a click away, I don't see a real need to spend over a decade going to a public school everyday, just to end up working for someone else later, but if you want to become a doctor, a lawyer, a rocket engineer, a biologist, a famous scientist, or something big like that, then that's a different story.

    ---------

    And for whatever final decision we decide to take today, we may not know the real outcome of that decision, until many years in the future, so we should weight all the options available, and then try to chose wisely, but even if we make a mistake, it might not be the end of the world and we can at least try again.

    Nobody is perfect and c'est la vie!

  25. #25
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    My philosophy is that children need to understand that learning isn't limited to "school". Homeschooling shows children that they are able to learn anywhere and everywhere. Every day, not just Monday through Friday from 8-3 or whatever. The socialization excuse for being in school is exactly that, an excuse. And as for the college graduate thing, it's the same thing. Some people don't need a college degree to prove they have brains. Life experience and learning how to cope and deal with people in the real world, coupled with learning what you need to know when you need to know it is more important (and beneficial) than having a piece of paper that says you attended classes in a college for 4 years.

    Yes, people need to be educated. No, they don't need a paper that says they are
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