Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    ABW Ambassador Snib's Avatar
    Join Date
    January 18th, 2005
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    5,303
    ISPs Adding Banners to Our Websites
    Hatred stirs up strife, But love covers all transgressions.

  2. #2
    ABW Ambassador
    Join Date
    January 18th, 2005
    Location
    Nunya, Business
    Posts
    23,684
    That won't last long. It's like waving a sue me and win flag. And not only that, those customers have to be pretty dumb to have an ISP that does that. A paid broadband one at that.

  3. #3
    general fuq mrbshouse's Avatar
    Join Date
    January 18th, 2005
    Location
    Argieville
    Posts
    1,381
    hometown on AOL (not talking a tripod type deal here) is anyone familiar with that? AOL has been duping members with the create a page crap for years. If you use their editor you end up with that at the top 1/4 of your page, but if you simply upload an html page... it is as you built it. A quick check of 10 sites in random search "members.aol.com" shows 5 outa 10 had the ad script in place

    I am not aware of any rev share aol offers for these ads delivered by the use of their auto added Java script. This could open much bigger lines of thought.... what is allowable?

  4. #4
    ABW Ambassador
    Join Date
    January 18th, 2005
    Location
    Nunya, Business
    Posts
    23,684
    That's different tho. That's kind of the deal if you build a page with aol. That would have 0 affect on any of our sites. This kind of thing with the ISP, the people using that ISP, would see ISP ads on our sites. With AOL, a better comparison would be if you had AOL as an ISP and everywhere you went you would have ads showing up on sites that AOL would be making money off of. I think some free ISPs did that back in the day, along with adware. Reminds me when I first started and had Gator on my computer. I would visit my site and others and they would throw up banners to cover mine. Same neighborhood. So if someone had that ISP in Texas and visited your site, that ISPs ads can be showing on your site.

  5. #5
    ABW Ambassador
    Join Date
    January 18th, 2005
    Location
    Nunya, Business
    Posts
    23,684
    And read the nonsense on their site too:

    "NebuAd's Generation3 behavioral targeting solutions are built to anonymously match advertisements to consumers based on highly segmented consumer categories, demographics, geography, lifestyle and interests. Within an ISP network, NebuAd's Generation3 behavioral targeting solutions observe, analyze and act on consumer behavior across the entire Internet, uniquely operating without having to rely on desktop software, cookies, adware or spyware and without collecting and using any personally identifiable information. ISPs in partnership with NebuAd are able to deliver an enhanced browsing experience through the delivery of the most relevant, meaningful advertisements to each consumer in the appropriate place at the most appropriate time."

    Sounds like lines adware companies would use, it's just comes with the ISP. And they say they don't rely on adware but deliver ads for an enhanced browsing experience, lol.

  6. #6
    general fuq mrbshouse's Avatar
    Join Date
    January 18th, 2005
    Location
    Argieville
    Posts
    1,381
    ok given the behavioral targeting of the ads it's a totally different thing going on thanks for correcting me. Is this going to be as much about privacy as it is trespassing on web sites?

    I wonder if there will be a way for web masters to stop ad delivery within our sites?

  7. #7
    ABW Ambassador
    Join Date
    January 18th, 2005
    Location
    Nunya, Business
    Posts
    23,684
    Not sure but it's nothing I'm worried about. The actual effect is probably barely even measurable, still don't like it. First it's some ISP I've never heard of in Texas, not sure how many people are using them. There could be other ISPs using them but I haven't heard of any and the majors would never try something like that, more like some super small ones. Plus I think they'll get handled sooner or later or the people using the ISP will smarten up. Usually when something is ad supported, it's free to the user, these people are actually paying for broadband plus they get this advertising too. Don't understand that, not sure what the competition is down there as far as broadband. You have that (not too big of a market of people wanting ad supported ISP) plus any possible legal problems that could come with this. Just don't see this lasting too long.

  8. #8
    .
    Join Date
    January 18th, 2005
    Posts
    2,973
    Basically, this is the ISP intercepting and altering copyrighted content "on the fly" without the copyright owner's knowledge or permission, and without the consumer knowing what's been changed or added. In other words, this is clear copyright infringement, as well as "unfair competition," and there are probably a handful of "deceptive trade practices" and "consumer protection" claims to be added.

    I assume that the backers of this concept are inserting clauses into the user agreements so that the consumer gives "permission" for this, or is perhaps even treated as "requesting this feature," so the defense is pretty much the same as the toolbar folks: it's just "consumer choice." Of course, the consumer has no choice, and 99% of consumers won't realize what's happening.

    We all know what's actually going to happen: the inserted ads won't be matched to the page content; just like the ads on GeoCities and AOL, they will be completely unrelated or only tangentially related. (For example, when consumers view a medical web site about infertility, they will be insulted by ads for "enhancement creams" and Viagra and Cialis; when they visit a web site about the Wisconsin Dells, they'll see ads for Dell.com. When someone visits the web site for the family court, they'll see ads pop up for legal-form companies or paralegal services, which will appear to be "approved by the court" since they are right there on the court's web site.)

    Once somebody starts messing with content by inserting extra ads, the path is clearly set.

    The second step will be to turn plain text into hyperlinks with ads, so every time a web page mentions "breast cancer," the word "breast" will be highlighted with a link to a porn site, and when the consumer visits that Wisconsin Dells web site, the word "Dells" will become an affiliate link to Dell.com.

    Next, they will start "ad substitution" (replacing ads on the web site with other advertisements -- which, although defended as "helpful to the user," would be less relevant or context-appropriate than the original paid ads).

    And then comes "link substitution" so that the ISP's or advertising company's affiliate IDs are substituted for the original IDs -- and perhaps the destination URL is changed to a different merchant. (Basically, this is the exact same thing as a "toolbar" but done at the ISP level so the consumer doesn't even have the opportunity to either know about or remove the toolbar.)

    I agree that it's only a matter of time before lawsuits are filed -- though the ISP's upstream bandwidth providers may act first. (Remember, all those liability exemptions for ISPs who serve as mere intermediaries for web content don't apply if they are tinkering with the content.)

  9. #9
    Lite On The Do, Heavy On The Nuts Donuts's Avatar
    Join Date
    January 18th, 2005
    Location
    Winter Park, FL
    Posts
    6,930
    The essence of this is the same as adware / spyware to me - respecting the intellectual property rights of the website owner AND the privacy of the individual surfer.

    Interlopers, whether the ISP or Zango, monetize off the backs of others by violating and poaching.

    They inspire ad blockers, worry consumers and perpetuate troubles (montioring / sharing / using surfing data) - all bad for our industry.

    Over the years, I've seen greed drive people to do anythig to make money - eventually, I believe, this will result in privacy controls for consumers that stop virtually all open data sharing. Parties have shown too many times that their access leads to abuses. In the coming decades, control of electronic data will reach new legislative and systemic heights - behavioral data will become akin to financial data. It will take time and a lot more abuses, but I think it'll come to be. Releasing behavioral data will be more like making a paypal payment and we'll have personal data banks, regulated by the government, that retain and control access to our data.

    Far fetched, sure. But I'm talking about the distant future, not tomorrow.

  10. #10
    ABW Ambassador
    Join Date
    January 18th, 2005
    Posts
    2,420
    >>regulated by the government

    OR, maybe GOO

    Which is more EVIL ?

  11. #11
    Lite On The Do, Heavy On The Nuts Donuts's Avatar
    Join Date
    January 18th, 2005
    Location
    Winter Park, FL
    Posts
    6,930
    News story on this, about NebuAd being called on by congress, and that several executives there are formerly of other adware companies, not sure how much of this news story today is new though...

    http://biz.yahoo.com/ap/080709/advertising_privacy.html

  12. #12
    Outsourced Program Manager Jorge - SHOPiMAR's Avatar
    Join Date
    January 18th, 2005
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    3,550
    Hope it's not just another million dollar 'slap on the wrist' kind of thing, or joke .

  13. Newsletter Signup

+ Reply to Thread

Similar Threads

  1. Adding affiliate banners to Wordpress
    By lehmannresearch in forum Blogging, Mobile and Social Media
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: March 19th, 2013, 06:37 AM
  2. Adding links from well known websites?
    By EGomes2107 in forum Search Engine Optimization
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: April 4th, 2012, 05:20 AM
  3. ISPs to Police Content?
    By Haiko de Poel, Jr. in forum Midnight Cafe'
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: January 25th, 2012, 09:46 PM
  4. Help Adding flash banners
    By Daniel - GTO in forum ShareASale - SAS
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: January 22nd, 2010, 01:29 PM
  5. Replies: 25
    Last Post: August 30th, 2004, 11:15 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •