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  1. #1
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    I have a problem with a design client.

    Who wants to help?

  2. #2
    Assistant Regional Manager Rik's Avatar
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    What's the problem?

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    Webmaster Resources | Web Hosting Solutions

  3. #3
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    Sorry I didnt remove that. I finally resolved it.

    A client didnt want to pay and kept trying to change everything and I told them, Im not doing any more work for you until the balance is paid in full.

    They paypalled me right away.

    How do you avoid these types of problems with clients?

    It is my policy to always charge up front. I made an exception for them.

  4. #4
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    The solution is naturaly not to make any exceptions!

    I own my own Web Development and designing company, and trust me, even when dealing with mates, always use the same buisness and negociating system.

  5. #5
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    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Pedro Monteiro:
    The solution is naturaly not to make any exceptions!

    I own my own Web Development and designing company, and trust me, even when dealing with mates, always use the same buisness and negociating system.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    So, are most people requiring payment in full up front?

    By the way, my rates are low and I always finish a site within the week. Thats partially why I require all up front.

    ps i never deal with mates!! lol

  6. #6
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    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by papasan:
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Pedro Monteiro:
    The solution is naturaly not to make any exceptions!

    I own my own Web Development and designing company, and trust me, even when dealing with mates, always use the same buisness and negociating system.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    So, are most people requiring payment in full up front?

    By the way, my rates are low and I always finish a site within the week. Thats partially why I require all up front.

    ps i never deal with mates!! lol<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Personally I always charge 30% of the full of payment in the beggining of the project. If the project is very extensive, I tend to charge in a segmental system that takes into consideration not only the current investemt budget available to the client, as the work load and time that the work is requiring.

    Not negociating with mates is a good move by the way. [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif[/img]

  7. #7
    Outsourced Program Manager Chris -  AMWSO's Avatar
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    Hi

    We take 50% down and have set sign off points, numbers of draft iterations and SOW docs etc. Once a client has signed off on anything they do so with the understanding that any change will then cost them. At the end of the day it is about client management and managing their expectations.

    I think we have roughly 9 sign off points in out process and the contract clearly states the limitations of design changes and so forth.

    Cheers

    Chris

    Chris Sanderson
    Mondera.com Partner Management
    90 Return Days : 100% Parasite Free : Fast Support : Commission on ALL Sales.

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  8. #8
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    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Chris - Mondera/WSO:
    Hi

    We take 50% down and have set sign off points, numbers of draft iterations and SOW docs etc. Once a client has signed off on anything they do so with the understanding that any change will then cost them. At the end of the day it is about client management and managing their expectations.

    I think we have roughly 9 sign off points in out process and the contract clearly states the limitations of design changes and so forth.

    Cheers

    Chris

    Chris Sanderson
    Mondera.com Partner Management
    90 Return Days : 100% Parasite Free : Fast Support : Commission on ALL Sales.

    http://www.mondera.com/affiliate_support/index.asp
    <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    huh?

    I thought Mondera was jewelry?

  9. #9
    Schlaumeier cumbrowski's Avatar
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    Webdesign is some times a pain in the bud.

    Since "good design" is in the eye of the beholder, no real 100% clear proposals can be made. Stuff one person loves is considered ugly by another one.

    Not to talk about the tweaking of "generaly" accepted design concepts with the statement: "good, but..."
    Font color here, Font Style there, alignment here etc. etc.

    There is no 100% foolproof way to nail your customer. However.

    1.
    Limit the proposal to a fix numbers of general design concepts.

    2.
    let them first agree to one of the general design concepts

    3.
    limitate the number (or hours) for changes to the general design.

    4.
    split the payments for your work depending on the status.

    make sure that you receive enough money to cover your internal costs for step 1. Meaning an initial payment of the customer due after the contract was signed (before any work on the project starts).

    make sure , that you get the money for step 3.
    when they did 2.

    the rest of the payment is due, when the customer is satisfied (that plus some of 3. should be your profit).
    If the customer requests to much changes, remind him on the limitation in the contact and tell him.. okay, but you have to pay $xxx.xx extra for that changes.

    If he refused to pay, hand him over what you have done so far, when he sent you in writing, that your work was not completed and that he will make the intended changes himself.
    Thats a good thing to have in writing that the customer can get problems, when he uses your "unfinished" work without paying the contracted amount.

    I am not a lawyer, but I have some experiences with that problem. Its just a tip and no legal advice.

    Carsten

    Shop-Links.net Partner
    http://www.shop-links.net

    If you can't move things, try harder!

  10. #10
    Schlaumeier cumbrowski's Avatar
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    Another comment to my post before.

    Some customers may not like it, but tell them,
    that they have also to relaize, that it is a bilateral relationship.

    You can not provide something, they do not know.
    They have to be active too.
    It does not help the designer to get a comment like "I don't like it, I don't know why, try something else".

    A contract stating $yyy dollars for a design until the customer is satisfied might work in some cases, but not always.

    a contact should put obligations to the designer and also to the customer. The customer must be forced to think about it and beeing productive in the design phase.

    You can disregard that, if you have political reasons to satisfy the customer at all cost.

    Carsten

    Shop-Links.net Partner
    http://www.shop-links.net

    If you can't move things, try harder!

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